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Old 07-17-2014, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Montana
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Pisa Italy brings two memories to mind.

I saw the leaning tower, and I laughed out loud. It is a monument to mediocraty! The chapel and the baptistry also lean (and sink!).

However, I also saw the "David" and my jaw dropped. The statue is flawed (arm proportions) but so exisitly captures the denumua (sp?) between fear in battle and victory. It is an absolutely amazing thing to experience seeing the statue in person. Pictures simply can't capture the emotion you will experience.
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Old 07-17-2014, 02:43 PM
 
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1. Crowds crying in the streets of a city in Bretagne as France was knocked out of the Euro Cup in 2004

2. Sunset over Santorini, Greece

3. Seeing a group of California Condors flying over the cliffs of Pinnacles National Park
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Old 07-17-2014, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuck's Dad View Post
I also saw the "David" and my jaw dropped. The statue is flawed (arm proportions)...
Also the head's way too big and the feet are of exaggerated proportion. Not to mention that the pupils are moon craters and the hair is cool whip. These aren't necessarily flaws unless your expectation is 100% naturalism, in which case I'd say skip the Accademia and just look at the people outside. Rather, they are either creative choices made by Michelangelo during the sculpting process or a result of some limitations in the technology of his day… either way, they boil down to "Art".

I agree about the tower of Pisa… most over-rated 'iconic' site of all time.
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Old 07-17-2014, 03:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuck's Dad View Post
Pisa Italy brings two memories to mind.

I saw the leaning tower, and I laughed out loud. It is a monument to mediocraty! The chapel and the baptistry also lean (and sink!).

However, I also saw the "David" and my jaw dropped. The statue is flawed (arm proportions) but so exisitly captures the denumua (sp?) between fear in battle and victory. It is an absolutely amazing thing to experience seeing the statue in person. Pictures simply can't capture the emotion you will experience.
I believe the hand is larger to show that it is god guiding the hand and giving him strength.

It was also supposed to be viewed from below, Which is how it was commissioned.
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Old 07-17-2014, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
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Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
My brother said he remembers the smell of the tannery as much as, or more than, anything else.
The putrid smell and horrible working conditions are the reasons I always remember it actually

Last edited by danielsa1775; 07-17-2014 at 03:57 PM..
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Old 07-17-2014, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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Originally Posted by Meyerland View Post
I believe the hand is larger to show that it is god guiding the hand and giving him strength. It was also supposed to be viewed from below, Which is how it was commissioned.
Those are all speculations by art historians and other scholars, most of whom have no idea how to draw, much less sculpt the human form out of marble. None of us were inside Michelangelo's head in the early 1500's so we can't say for sure, but it's a good bet that he wasn't thinking whatever some art students ~ 500 years his junior say he was.
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Old 07-17-2014, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Oceania
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Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Kulkukan, the great pyramid, at Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Mexico was my ultimate vacation site sight. It had been on my bucket list since I was in fourth grade.

The first time I saw the ocean was humbling and breathtaking. It still is.

I can't pick from a third. Too many choices. We live on such a beautiful little planet.

There are many places in the USA to visit and sights to see I have no wish to leave the mainland again.
I lived in Tripoli, Libya as a child and hung at the beach on a reular basis.

Visit every state/National park and you will see something cool. The Tetons are amazing as is Padre Island or Cape Hatteras.
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Old 07-17-2014, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
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So hard to answer this question! So many sites that will live forever in my memory, it's hard to rate three as the best. Today, I'll cast my vote for:

-Kyoto in Japan ... not one sight in particular, rather the whole city.
-The Acropolis ... especially seeing it lit up at night.
-In the U.S., I'm tempted to say views on the Pacific Coast Highway since I am a lover of oceans, but for sheer breathtaking impact, I've got to give it to the Grand Canyon.

For my emotional reaction to a place that has nothing to do with WHERE it is located, I want to give a mention to the Rothko Chapel in Houston. I was incredibly moved by that place. I admire Mark Rothko's paintings very much, so I wanted to see the chapel for purely artistic reasons, but I had no idea it would evoke such a response in me, a non-religious person. Please don't judge it by the photographs that appear online or in books. The paintings are SO subtle, their effect cannot be captured in print and the architecture of the building, interestingly not the work of any single architect, contributes enormously to the overall effect. Like many great man-made places, one has to be IN it to "get it."

The chapel was founded by Houston philanthropists John and Dominique de Menil. It was dedicated in 1971 and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2000. The de Menils intended the chapel to be "open to all religions and belonging to none." It has become, through broad and continual use, a center for international cultural, religious, and philosophical exchanges, for colloquia and performances, as well as a place of private prayer for individuals of all faiths. The day I visited, Vietnamese refuges were having a lovely and moving Buddhist ceremony to memorialize their loved ones lost in the fall of Saigon. Seeing that enhanced my understanding of how people can use this place to address their spiritual needs. The Rothko Chapel is a tranquil and evocative place in an unexpected location, a surprising thing to be done with oil money and a surprising achievement from a depressive who committed suicide after clashing with all of the three architects who tried to create a place for the deepest expressions of his soul.
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Old 07-17-2014, 07:05 PM
 
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I will never forget taking a tour of the Peace Park at Hiroshima, Japan. It is very upsetting. In fact, it is so emotionally draining, by the time you get out you want to just run out of there screaming.

Barcelona Spain, the most romantic city in Europe. Strolling along Las Ramblas in the early evening.

In the US, I want to say the Grand Canyon, but the giant Sequioas, they are the largest living things on earth. When you see them from a distance you think "Ok, they're big, but not that big." Then when you stand at the foot of one, they're gigantic!
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Old 07-17-2014, 07:24 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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What an interesting question? I don't know. I think it may be something I haven't seen yet.

My brother owns property in the North Carolina mountains that has a rock formation I doubt any of you will ever see and it is incredible. I want him to build a road to it so everybody can enjoy it.

Oh yes, The New River in Ashe County, N. C. flows North and looks like it is going backwards. How could anyone ever forget seeing a river flow backwards? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_River_(Kanawha_River)

Many rock formations out West. Probably I should say the Grand Canyon but I also love the Garden of the Gods between Denver and Colorado Springs. Pike's Peak, Rocky Mountain National Park, Zion National Park, Mesa Verde, I love the whole West to visit. Then I want to come back home to comfortable North Carolina.

The Mississippi River is different every time we cross it.

Last edited by NCN; 07-17-2014 at 07:36 PM..
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