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Old 07-19-2014, 11:16 AM
 
1 posts, read 715 times
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I would like to take a solo vacation which would involve some mountain driving (in the CO Rocky Mountains). While I have been in the mountains before, I never did any of the driving. I've heard it's rather difficult (I've looked up how to do it). Would it be a bad idea to be alone when I'm doing it for the first time?
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Old 07-19-2014, 11:27 AM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
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No, Just don't go to fast. Also consider the weather.

Also depends on what you mean by Mountain Driving?
Interstates? No Issue Going alone
State Hi-ways? No Issue Going alone
County roads? As long as there is some other traffic, or well used/maintained
Dirt Road/Paths? Would take someone with you.
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Old 07-19-2014, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Like flyonpa said, it all depends on where you're going and what time of year you're doing it. Summertime in the Rockies in Colorado runs from late June to mid September. During those months you will occasionally see snow showers above 12,000', but not very often.

I-70 from Denver to Grand Junction is a breeze. The speed limit is lower through the Glenwood Canyon because of tight curves.

The only really dangerous "main" roads in Colorado are US-550 between Ouray and Durango, Trail Ridge Road (US-34) through Rocky Mountain National Park, Mt. Evans Road, and the Pikes Peak Highway. All 4 of those roads have narrow spots with no shoulder, no guardrail, and steep dropoffs.

As long as you stick to the main roads, don't drive like a bat outta hell, and don't venture off onto county roads or jeep trails you should be fine.
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Old 07-19-2014, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
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It is entirely dependent on YOUR comfort level. I've lived in California all my life and I will never be comfortable driving south along the cliffs of Highway 1. Take plenty of breaks and don';t push yourself. Remember it's supposed to be a vacation, which means FUN. Have fun!
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Old 07-19-2014, 06:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Like flyonpa said, it all depends on where you're going and what time of year you're doing it. Summertime in the Rockies in Colorado runs from late June to mid September. During those months you will occasionally see snow showers above 12,000', but not very often.

I-70 from Denver to Grand Junction is a breeze. The speed limit is lower through the Glenwood Canyon because of tight curves.

The only really dangerous "main" roads in Colorado are US-550 between Ouray and Durango, Trail Ridge Road (US-34) through Rocky Mountain National Park, Mt. Evans Road, and the Pikes Peak Highway. All 4 of those roads have narrow spots with no shoulder, no guardrail, and steep dropoffs.

That is a pretty good assessment of the situation. I will NEVER drive US-550 between Ouray and Durango again - the drive was breathtaking ... in a not so good way.

As for the Pikes Peak Highway, it is not all that bad of a drive BUT many of us flatlanders start to feel the impact of the high altitude around 12,000 feet.

One other note. If you are unfamiliar with mountain driving, stay on the main roads and carry good maps with you at all times. Resist the temptations of back roads and forest roads.
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Old 07-19-2014, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
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Have you travelled at altitude before? I live in Denver but can still feel a difference when I travel above about 8000 feet although I can manage ok up to about 10000 feet. Above that, I start to feel sick enough (headachy, nauseated) where I think it would not be a wise choice to drive. And that's starting off at 5000 ft as my norm. When I used to visit Denver from the east coast, the physical adjustment was even worse. So some of this may depend on your personal tolerance to being at altitude.
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