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Old 07-25-2014, 12:45 PM
 
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I've never seen the aisle rule in play either, but I have seen numerous passengers who would be obstructing the aisles should everyone have to get off in a hurry.

I can't imagine how airlines could screen out the differently abled without running afoul of the ADA. One passenger got on the with a little mutt that bark incessantly. She loudly proclaimed it was a service animal that kept her anxiety down. However, it raised the anxiety of everyone else on the plane considerably.

Seems about every third flight, I'm squeezed by a hefty passengers spilling out over the top of the arm rest and under as well. There does not seem to be a solution to the problem. I try to fly Southwest where I can chose the passengers I sit next to but sometimes it doesn't work out.
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Old 07-25-2014, 12:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
However, if the woman with the canes had been in the window seat as apparently she was supposed to be, I don't know how she'd have ever gotten off the plane.
Additionally, someone who has difficulty standing from an aisle seat is probably going to have a hard time with the sideways shimmy to get to the window. It can be awkward even for the able bodied. You have to bend enough not to hit your head on the overhead compartment while standing enough to get past the armrests (unless you're able to get them to stay up, which sometimes they won't).
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Old 07-25-2014, 01:46 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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Make "fat people" buy two (or more) seats. Problem solved!
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Old 07-25-2014, 02:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
I've never seen the aisle rule in play either, but I have seen numerous passengers who would be obstructing the aisles should everyone have to get off in a hurry.

I can't imagine how airlines could screen out the differently abled without running afoul of the ADA. One passenger got on the with a little mutt that bark incessantly. She loudly proclaimed it was a service animal that kept her anxiety down. However, it raised the anxiety of everyone else on the plane considerably.

Seems about every third flight, I'm squeezed by a hefty passengers spilling out over the top of the arm rest and under as well. There does not seem to be a solution to the problem. I try to fly Southwest where I can chose the passengers I sit next to but sometimes it doesn't work out.
Realistically, I think airlines only address mobility and aisle seats when passengers use pre-boarding services. If you pre-board because you need assistance getting onto the plane or into a seat, then you will be in a window seat. People who have trouble getting into the window seat can either sit in a bulkhead row, or raise all of the armrests to slide across the seats to the window. If the passenger can get onto the plane reasonably independently, then the flight attendants are going to assume they can get in and out of the seat on their own unless someone points out otherwise.

Requiring a person with mobility problems to sit in a window seat does not run afoul of the ADA. It's no different than Amtrak having designated seats near the doors for people with disabilities, or buses having designated spaces for wheelchairs.
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Old 07-25-2014, 02:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpheels View Post
Realistically, I think airlines only address mobility and aisle seats when passengers use pre-boarding services. If you pre-board because you need assistance getting onto the plane or into a seat, then you will be in a window seat. People who have trouble getting into the window seat can either sit in a bulkhead row, or raise all of the armrests to slide across the seats to the window. If the passenger can get onto the plane reasonably independently, then the flight attendants are going to assume they can get in and out of the seat on their own unless someone points out otherwise.

Requiring a person with mobility problems to sit in a window seat does not run afoul of the ADA. It's no different than Amtrak having designated seats near the doors for people with disabilities, or buses having designated spaces for wheelchairs.
However, most airlines have assigned seats. So whether you pre-board or not, you are in the same seat.

Some passengers require considerable assistance in getting onboard. I've seen people wheeled on riding on sort of a narrow seated wheelchair without arms. I've seen elderly people in wheelchairs until they get to the plane, and then lean heavily on their traveling companion until they get to a seat.

I've also seen elderly people put on planes that don't know up from down.

I flew with my mother numerous times. She had dementia and walked incredibly slow. I would no more think of putting her on a plane alone than the man in the moon.

Numerous times we sat next to elderly people who were quite confused. One man who looked to be at least 90 kept repeating, "Where's Mama?" all the way to Seattle.

Had we had to make an emergency landing in some other airport, or had the person who was picking him up got delayed, he would have been in a world of hurt.

One woman with dementia wandered away from Reagan International and drowned in the Potomac. The airline said it was not asked to provide assistance with deplaning. The family said that someone with a wheelchair was there to meet her but she walked right past and never made contact.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-Barbados.html
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Old 07-25-2014, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
I can't imagine how airlines could screen out the differently abled without running afoul of the ADA. One passenger got on the with a little mutt that bark incessantly. She loudly proclaimed it was a service animal that kept her anxiety down. However, it raised the anxiety of everyone else on the plane considerably.
One of these days, the emotional support animal crowd and the deathly allergic to dogs or cats crowd are going to have a clash at 30,000 feet. I just hope it isn't a fatal one. And it's far too easy to go the emotional support animal route these days in the name of avoiding normal pet transport charges- just threaten to sue under ADA if someone says that Yappy isn't really there for that reason. And it's not always great for the pet either. A while back, I watched a woman claim the ESA card and refuse to put her chihuahua properly in its carrier, and then since it was the most crowded part of the MSP airport, the poor dog nearly got run over by about five different people with wheelie bags that had a hard time seeing a dog that small in a place where he was not expected.

At least I got a good text message conversation out of it with the spousal unit, who suggested I needed to start taking Biscuit the Emotional Support Hamster with me when I fly.
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Old 07-25-2014, 05:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post

At least I got a good text message conversation out of it with the spousal unit, who suggested I needed to start taking Biscuit the Emotional Support Hamster with me when I fly.


I say go for it.

Don't service animals had to have certifications of some sort? I just thought it was crazy that this wee, overly anxious dog was supposed to help her with her anxiety.
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Old 07-25-2014, 05:23 PM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post


I say go for it.

Don't service animals had to have certifications of some sort? I just thought it was crazy that this wee, overly anxious dog was supposed to help her with her anxiety.
Nope not as of yet.
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Old 07-25-2014, 07:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
Part two is shoulder width- from the waist down, I find airline seats acceptable comfortable, but I'm a broad-shouldered broad, ...apparently 20% of airline passengers also have issues with shoulder space regardless of the size of the rest of them.
I'm not a broad, but I'm also broad in the shoulders, despite having several inches of room within a normal coach-class seat on each side of my hips. Airline seats are very unpleasant for weight lifters. But then again, so are theater seats, or most car seats. It comes with the territory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
I've noticed many passengers with limited mobility. One elderly man I sat next to was so out of it I wondered what he would do in case of an emergency. He could barely move. Took him forever to get off the plane. What would he have done in case of an emergency?
As I mentioned above, a reasonable test needs to be applied to ascertain that passengers are sufficiently healthy to fly. Flying isn't inherently dangerous, but it does require a modicum of cooperation amongst all persons involved - passengers and staff. This cooperation is impossible, or at least very difficult, if passengers suffer from advanced dementia, various severe handicaps or ailments. It's not just obesity or old-age. An obese person could be a safe passenger, if not morbidly obese. But without standards of "being of sound mind and sound body", commercial air-travel becomes dangerous for all of us.
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Old 07-25-2014, 08:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
As I mentioned above, a reasonable test needs to be applied to ascertain that passengers are sufficiently healthy to fly. Flying isn't inherently dangerous, but it does require a modicum of cooperation amongst all persons involved - passengers and staff. This cooperation is impossible, or at least very difficult, if passengers suffer from advanced dementia, various severe handicaps or ailments. It's not just obesity or old-age. An obese person could be a safe passenger, if not morbidly obese. But without standards of "being of sound mind and sound body", commercial air-travel becomes dangerous for all of us.
They may be traveling to receive specialized medical care. People who are severely ill or disabled are less likely to be able to handle slower forms of transport, such as driving.
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