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Old 09-25-2014, 07:01 PM
 
2,288 posts, read 3,930,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Summerwhale View Post
Erm no and I really really don't want to.
You really really don't want a 3rd world country to become rich?? What a stupid thing to say.
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Old 09-28-2014, 08:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
You really really don't want a 3rd world country to become rich?? What a stupid thing to say.
Wealth is relative. Most people in Ghana do not consider themselves poor. And a lot of people who are materially rich are morally and spiritually bankrupt.
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Old 09-30-2014, 03:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DahomeyAhosi View Post
Wealth is relative. Most people in Ghana do not consider themselves poor. And a lot of people who are materially rich are morally and spiritually bankrupt.
Of course. I responded to a comment that came from a materially wealthy person from a materially wealthy country, and somehow I don't think that was his point.
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Old 10-01-2014, 11:54 PM
 
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I would say 75%+ of my travel is to developing countries. In my mind, Paris and London are about the same they were 10 and 20 years ago. There just isn't that much development, and people don't change that much. Very stable.

But in developing countries, things are moving _fast_. Already many cultures are disappearing. Hardly any nomadic cultures that were nomads in 2000 are still nomadic in 2014, for example. A lot of the things some countries are famous for are almost exclusively done for tourists in 2014, as a spectacle for the tourist dollar - not as part of their real daily lives.

Personally, I want to see as much of these places before they all look like a typical New Jersey suburb with strip malls.

Will they become rich? No. But they are developing fast enough to get to the point where their uniqueness disappears. You end up traveling to some very remote places, only to see people watching American reality TV shows on their TVs, listening to US/Euro music on their smartphones, driving Toyotas and Honda scooters, and following US news and Manchester United.

The differences are disappearing fast. It's good for the world, it's good for development, but as a traveler who wants to see something new, the allure is disappearing as well.
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Old 07-01-2016, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,511 posts, read 8,751,470 times
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Of the countries I have been in: Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, Ethiopia, The Gambia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Uganda, Rwanda - all had serious development problems that were being addressed in the 70s, but some have fallen by the wayside, some have gotten a lot worse. Uganda and Rwanda are on a "sort-of" upswing. The South African economy is unsustainable, and so on.
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Old 07-02-2016, 07:43 AM
 
735 posts, read 431,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frihed89 View Post
Of the countries I have been in: Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, Ethiopia, The Gambia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Uganda, Rwanda - all had serious development problems that were being addressed in the 70s, but some have fallen by the wayside, some have gotten a lot worse. Uganda and Rwanda are on a "sort-of" upswing. The South African economy is unsustainable, and so on.
No Africa country will be rich in the foreseeable future.

The last country to join the developed world is South Korea. Asia is where you can expect some developments. China and India are becoming richer than before, but neither will become a developed country.
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Old 07-03-2016, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Austin
29,546 posts, read 16,472,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A New Professional View Post
What do you think after traveling to the Third World, is there hope for them in the next 10-20 years or not?
I've been to several including China, India and South Africa. The short answer is no, they will not be much better in 10 - 20 years. For example, China has over 900 million people living on $5 per day or less. That's not going to change much at all in 10 - 20 years.
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Old 07-04-2016, 07:44 PM
 
163 posts, read 111,723 times
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I've been to 155 countries including 48 of 54 in Africa, missing mainly the tourist/safari destinations; add Central Asia, Yemen and a few others as my regular destinations. I do refugee and relief work on-site coordinated through UNHCR, usually four weeks a year (sometimes more), 30 years now. The other 48 weeks, I remain engaged and involved.

I missed this thread in 2014. Probably a good thing there.

I've no answer to the question. It's not the way I/we think. Wealth may come one day, but I'm living in the moment. Today's challenges are health/disease, sanitation, potable water availability, nutrition and demographic issues. Later, electrification, communication, education and gender equality.

Overlaying all this is displaced people (ethnic and religious challenges to name just two), politics and corruption of various sorts. Add: "Will" or lack thereof.
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Old 07-05-2016, 12:20 AM
 
735 posts, read 431,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadking2003 View Post
I've been to several including China, India and South Africa. The short answer is no, they will not be much better in 10 - 20 years. For example, China has over 900 million people living on $5 per day or less. That's not going to change much at all in 10 - 20 years.
Even in the best scenario, China won't be a rich country in my lifetime. Being an average Chinese is very tough. However, there will be more than 10 million relatively affluent Chinese households in twenty years assuming the best. Long story short, China won't be a rich country but will be a very important country.

South Africa was better before 1994, and we all know why it went downhill.
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Old 07-05-2016, 04:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayesian View Post

South Africa was better before 1994, and we all know why it went downhill.
Do we? Care to explain?
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