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Old 12-29-2015, 07:25 PM
 
220 posts, read 179,975 times
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I have a trip to Seattle coming up in February (Feb. 24 - Mar. 1) and I needed help with clothing.

I'll be coming from Miami, where winters are non-existent.

I was looking into buying a North Face jacket, since there's an NF outlet near my house and I want something durable for years to come.

Which model is best? I'm looking to keep warm and dry.


Also... what is the best way to dress there? Layers?
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Old 12-29-2015, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,071 posts, read 1,472,156 times
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I lived north of Seattle during my college years and went through a couple winters. Like you I'm a native of a warm climate but in all honesty the winters didn't really bother me. Just buy a jacket, whatever one you want, and you're set. No need to layer unless you get cold easily. Even when it was snowing up there I just had on one heavy jacket and jeans and I was fine. It's not Siberia up there.
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Old 12-29-2015, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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Layers is the way to go. If you can afford it, buy wick-dry stuff. I lived many years up there. I still have my wick-dry turtle-neck pullover from REI. They're so warm. But, you'll be most comfortable if you wear a t-shirt under other layers. that way, when you go from freezing temps outside to an overly warm room, you can just pull off layers.

You can't beat down for warmth in jackets. You can get them super cheap nowadays. Otherwise, layers plus a puffy jacket.

Shoes that are water proof and some super warm socks. You can get these in wick-dry, too.

REI – Top-Brand Clothing, Gear, Footwear and Expert Advice for All Your Outdoor Adventures - REI.com

The great thing about wick-dry clothing is that even if you sweat, it will keep you dry. Really warm, and it breathes.

The Seattle area is not only cold in winter with snow, but it's also wet. So, it feels extra cold. I disagree that all you need is jeans and a jacket. Worst case scenario, you have more on than you need, so you peel off layers.

The most frustrating part of dressing up there, was pants, in my opinion. It's not easy to remove long underwear. You need it when you're outside, but if you then go inside to a restaurant, you're too warm.

A decent in-between, is lined pants. Even then you can end up too warm, but they're cozy and if you remove layers up top, you would probably be okay.

http://www.rei.com/product/885727/pr...d-jeans-womens
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Old 12-29-2015, 11:46 PM
 
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You don't need anything heavy. Waterproof, but breathable is the way to go. North Face will have what you need. Looking at their site, the Resolve jackets should work. It's not insulated, but it'll keep you dry. Not too expensive either.

Oh, and umbrellas tell everyone your an out of towner, so use the hood on the jacket. LOL
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Old 12-29-2015, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,121 posts, read 22,989,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by st33lcas3 View Post
You don't need anything heavy. Waterproof, but breathable is the way to go. North Face will have what you need. Looking at their site, the Resolve jackets should work. It's not insulated, but it'll keep you dry. Not too expensive either.

Oh, and umbrellas tell everyone your an out of towner, so use the hood on the jacket. LOL
Dry but freezing. Hello.

Who are these people talking about only needing a light jacket in freezing rain and snow? Nobody who lived in Seattle in the winter, that's for sure. Seattle may not get a lot of measurable snow, but you will face ice and freezing temps along with rain when it's warm enough not to be sleet or snow. I spent 18 years in Western WA from the bottom to the top, including Seattle and Bellingham. A windbreaker will not keep you warm.

Who cares if you look like an out of towner. But, I also stopped using an umbrella when I lived in WA. Normally, a hood will work well enough, and then you don't have some wet thing you have to haul around (the umbrella).

But, if it's a windy day, so the rain is blowing right at your face, or you have packages you want to keep dry, or you want to use your phone without it getting all wet, then an umbrella is good to have. Just keep it facing straight into the wind so it doesn't turn inside out.
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Old 12-30-2015, 01:53 AM
 
3,340 posts, read 3,613,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Dry but freezing. Hello.

Who are these people talking about only needing a light jacket in freezing rain and snow? Nobody who lived in Seattle in the winter, that's for sure. Seattle may not get a lot of measurable snow, but you will face ice and freezing temps along with rain when it's warm enough not to be sleet or snow. I spent 18 years in Western WA from the bottom to the top, including Seattle and Bellingham. A windbreaker will not keep you warm.

Who cares if you look like an out of towner. But, I also stopped using an umbrella when I lived in WA. Normally, a hood will work well enough, and then you don't have some wet thing you have to haul around (the umbrella).

But, if it's a windy day, so the rain is blowing right at your face, or you have packages you want to keep dry, or you want to use your phone without it getting all wet, then an umbrella is good to have. Just keep it facing straight into the wind so it doesn't turn inside out.
I've lived in WA all my life. The first 26 in Spokane, the last 19 in Vancouver, WA where the weather is very much like Seattle's. The majority of the winter is rain. Yes, I've found a windbreaker works best. I can put on a warm shirt and be fine in all but the nastiest weather. I also like them since they are bulky, if I want to take it off in a store I can. Maybe it's because I grew up where you had to bundle up in the winter. On this side of the state though, it's not necessary. Of course someone from Florida may have a different definition of cold.
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Old 12-30-2015, 04:57 AM
 
220 posts, read 179,975 times
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would you recommend sperry topsiders?
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Old 12-30-2015, 12:07 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thespykidinseattle View Post
would you recommend sperry topsiders?
No. Unless you're going on a boat.
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Old 12-30-2015, 03:10 PM
 
389 posts, read 270,458 times
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Get warm, waterproof boots with a good tread on the bottom so you don't slip on icy streets.

You don't need hiking boots - something synthetic you wear with warm socks will be fine.
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Old 12-30-2015, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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People talk like we live in ankle-deep rainwater or something. Sheesh, yeah, it rains, actually less per year than you get in Florida. In late February-early March as you say about your timing, the odds of below-freezing temperatures in the city are very low. Nobody I know uses waterproof anything; if you're made of sugar a $5 umbrella is a lot cheaper than a $200 goretex anorak; a cap is cheaper than a raincoat.

One thing to note is that unlike other places, when it's going to rain you usually know about it well in advance. We don't get sudden torrential downpours as a rule; most "rainy" days have numerous dry periods mixed in with the drizzle. And there are plenty of places to take shelter from the drizzle; most will happily sell you a $5 coffee of some sort.

Get a water-resistant (not waterproof, they sweat) light jacket and a couple of sweaters and you're good to go.
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