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Old 03-02-2016, 05:56 PM
 
2,441 posts, read 1,948,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
OP,

If you transported several Southern Indians to many small towns in the US, don't you think that they would encounter the same?
I have never (literally never) seen a tourist followed down the street by a crowd of children the way they do in some developing countries. It just doesn't happen.
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Old 03-02-2016, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Bran's tree
11,134 posts, read 4,902,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildColonialGirl View Post
I have never (literally never) seen a tourist followed down the street by a crowd of children the way they do in some developing countries. It just doesn't happen.
When I was in a rural part of East Africa, many children have never seen a 'mzungu'. I stayed with a first-time host family, and within the second night, I had a bunch of children sitting around me touching and playing with my hair (long, straight, strawberry blonde) and staring into my eyes (I have grey eyes), and calling over other children to do the same. Lmao. I felt like a human petting zoo, but to me it was more funny and charming than offensive.

I also got a lot of marriage proposals there, but I learned to rattle off the same answer about already being married (though I wasn't married at the time).
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Old 03-02-2016, 07:17 PM
 
3,196 posts, read 1,824,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graceC View Post
Meh, I'm an Asian and I still get stared at in the US, some by adults, some by kids.

As recently as last year when I was in Pensacola, FL: I was standing on calf deep water on Pensacola beach admiring two wild sting rays that swam close to the shore. A couple of kids (10-12 years old maybe?) were standing next to me and were staring at me for quite sometime, so I started chatting with them about the sting rays. They gaped at me when I opened my mouth and one of them blurted out: "Oh, how come you can speak English?". Bwahahaha...!!
What a hilarious story, made so by your amazing sense of humor about it! Thank you for sharing.
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Old 03-02-2016, 08:28 PM
 
8 posts, read 8,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Being stared at for being a different color or nationality is very rare nowadays. Indians are used to visitors - business people and tourists, same with just about every other country except the extreme isolated vils. Now I've been to some backwaters - India multiple times and multiple locations, southeast asia, Africa, you name it....stared at? Not really.

Not in the least except that touts can identify a westerner from a mile away and think dollar signs. Some of the more ignorant local young men may see a western girl and have other thoughts brought on by Hollywood misconceptions - that's an issue. Another thing is, I think one poster mentioned this, foreign ideas and standards of personal space or privacy are much different than here. They stare - period. They stare at cows, at posters, at trees, at fellow Indians. Staring is not considered rude.

But other than that? - Me thinks much of these posts are paranoid perceptions.
If you GOOGLE staring India there is tons of posts from travelers complaining about the staring.
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Old 03-02-2016, 08:50 PM
 
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Weird. The OP is "Not a member."
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Old 03-02-2016, 08:56 PM
 
12,378 posts, read 18,479,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacific2 View Post
Weird. The OP is "Not a member."
Looks like he earned a trip to permanent banned camp.
Likely this was a troll post and the closest "world traveler" got to India was the local curry restaurant down the block.
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Old 03-03-2016, 05:18 AM
 
729 posts, read 588,085 times
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In 2011, we, a group of brown skinned Indians, went sight seeing to Two Rivers, WI. Yep, that is white bread country.
Guess what- everyone we came across stared at us.
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Old 03-03-2016, 11:01 AM
 
3,650 posts, read 1,575,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by World Trav View Post
I always wanted to see India. It had been on my list for years and finally I got the time and money together to go. What an experience. It's so exotic! The smells, the food, the con artists, the beggars, the touts, the hassle, the inefficency, wow, just wow!

But the most challenging aspect of traveling to India was the constant stares I got as I walked down the street. (I am an average looking white guy in his 30s.) The staring was endless and would not stop when I stared back at them. There seemed to be no social stigma about staring. EVERYONE would stare at me and my wife, EVERYONE. I felt like a mix between being a Movie Star and a freak.

Anyone else experience this while traveling overseas?
Thats a norm..People are not used to seeing foreigners. I wouldnt be surprised if someone wanted to take a snap with you ..NOt only that, men even stare are good looking women shamelessly.


Most of them are harmless, its only the sellers and scouts who wants to rip you off..


I am serious, in the 90s we used to see English movies just for the "scenes" ( and hence believed foreigners would always do that all the time ) .
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Old 03-03-2016, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,081 posts, read 1,480,212 times
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I've never been to India but been to China many times and it happens in areas of China where there aren't many foreigners, or should I say visible foreigners. Me being an American of Asian descent who looks Chinese but isn't, am as foreign as any other foreigner except for skin color. Trust me, you should be thankful you're not in my shoes when I go to China. I'd much rather be stared at by friendly eyes and treated differently than treated like a native. While I always hear they're generally overly friendly and gracious towards foreigners, specifically white foreigners, I've never encountered any of this friendliness anywhere. While most people in the big cities don't really care, those that do are usually hostile towards me, almost never friendly. I'm wondering if Indians are the same as Chinese? Bottom line is that unlike in the US, where staring is probably neutral at best, hostile at worst, I China (probably India too) it's usually a sign of curiosity and admiration. At least in China a lot of the population has a severe inferiority complex towards white people and a dislike of other asians.
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Old 03-06-2016, 06:48 AM
 
569 posts, read 375,344 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by World Trav View Post
I always wanted to see India. It had been on my list for years and finally I got the time and money together to go. What an experience. It's so exotic! The smells, the food, the con artists, the beggars, the touts, the hassle, the inefficency, wow, just wow!

But the most challenging aspect of traveling to India was the constant stares I got as I walked down the street. (I am an average looking white guy in his 30s.) The staring was endless and would not stop when I stared back at them. There seemed to be no social stigma about staring. EVERYONE would stare at me and my wife, EVERYONE. I felt like a mix between being a Movie Star and a freak.

Anyone else experience this while traveling overseas?
I didn't know why the Indians were staring at you.

But 20 years ago, if you went to China without any escorts, then you would be tossed around like the valuables. I meant you had to remember that they were "the commies", so their motto was probably - your home is my home.
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