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View Poll Results: Prefer wide body or narrow body planes to Europe in economy class?
Narrow Body (One aisle) 3 6.38%
Wide Body (Two aisles) 23 48.94%
Don't know or care 21 44.68%
Voters: 47. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-21-2019, 08:08 AM
 
2,110 posts, read 722,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Newer planes have have better entertainment systems and are generally interiors are less beat up. 787 and A380 you can really tell the difference, everything is still new and works well.
One development I really like is the "bring your own device" entertainment format. Of course that means you have to bring your own charged-up device (or have charging ports at your seat), but it was getting to the point that the seatback screens weren't working very well (they get poked a lot) and that awful box with all the electronics interfered with leg room. I hope they retrofit the older planes to allow that!
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Old 04-21-2019, 09:14 AM
 
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Are you kidding? Wide body means more passengers, more people getting up and sitting back down, more snoring and farting and disturbance in general. The seats are still cramped either way.
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Old 04-21-2019, 11:44 AM
 
Location: On the road
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Are you kidding? Wide body means more passengers, more people getting up and sitting back down, more snoring and farting and disturbance in general. The seats are still cramped either way.
There are two aisles on a wide body. Someone getting up on the other aisle isn't going to bother me on my side of the plane. Look at it this way, per row:

Single aisle: 6 passengers/aisle
Wide body 2-4-2: 4 passengers/aisle
Wide body 3-3-3: 4.5 passengers/aisle
Wide body 3-4-3: 5 passengers/aisle

No matter what the format the wide body planes have more space because there are less people per aisle, which means less crowded aisles and more overhead bin space per passenger.
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Old 04-21-2019, 02:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
There are two aisles on a wide body. Someone getting up on the other aisle isn't going to bother me on my side of the plane. Look at it this way, per row:

Single aisle: 6 passengers/aisle
Wide body 2-4-2: 4 passengers/aisle
Wide body 3-3-3: 4.5 passengers/aisle
Wide body 3-4-3: 5 passengers/aisle

No matter what the format the wide body planes have more space because there are less people per aisle, which means less crowded aisles and more overhead bin space per passenger.
Total passenger number is still higher per row (depending on which configuration is used), and a wider plane might also have more rows.
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Old 04-21-2019, 04:19 PM
 
Location: On the road
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Right, but if there is another aisle then half of the row doesn't impact your flight. They can move about freely and never pass your seat or need to get out past you. More rows isn't relevant because that is also more shared common space in the aisles, unless there are less services available (restrooms, etc.) per passenger.
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Old 04-21-2019, 05:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Total passenger number is still higher per row (depending on which configuration is used), and a wider plane might also have more rows.
A DC-9 which had 2-3 seating and one aisle had a fuselage width of 131.6in and a cabin width:122.4in
A B737 which has 3-3 seating and one aisle had a fuselage width of 148in and a cabin width:139.2in
An A220 which has 2-3 seating and one aisle had a fuselage width of 144in and a cabin width:129.0in

Obviously the DC-9 had much more comfortable seating as only 1 in 5 seats was a middle seat and there was more width per seat. The DC-9 was the much better -selling jet before the airlines were deregulated in 1978. Then the best selling narrowbody jet became the B737 because the economics were better.

The A220 is actually roomier than a DC-9 by well over an inch per seat. You also have the option of making the middle seat extra wide as a bonus for being stuck there.

The A220-300 actually has a 3100 nautical mile range. Boston's Logan International Airport to Dublin Airport is 2600 nautical miles

So there are narrowbodies and then there are narrowbodies.

Last edited by PacoMartin; 04-21-2019 at 05:43 PM..
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Old 04-21-2019, 05:59 PM
 
Location: South Australia
374 posts, read 96,249 times
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Fascinating thread.

The last time I can remember flying in a narrow body plane was in 2011. That was to Townsville, a small regional city in Queensland 2x2 hours. I made mistake of flying with Virgin, because it was the cheapest, at $345 return.

From here to Singapore is 6.5 hours, about 9 to Hong Kong from memory. If going to Europe or North America, always had a stopover. From Hong Kong of Kualar Lumpur, another 12 hours to Europe.

I think the trips I took were in wide bodies because the planes then went on to North America or Europe.

Had never even thought of this until this thread

Smallest planes I've been in are; A Fokker Friendship, in 1975.--180 miles by air to the small city of Port Augusta, flew at 10K feet. It was wonderful.

In China; Russian Aleutians, turbo props. (I think, can't swear to it) At that time flown by PRC air force officers. On one trip they were overbooked. No problem; they just bunged a few folding chairs in the aisle. I kid you not. When at cruising height, they liked to turn off the a/c. My wife fainted.
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Old 04-22-2019, 01:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by c charlie View Post
From here to Singapore is 6.5 hours, about 9 to Hong Kong from memory. If going to Europe or North America, always had a stopover. From Hong Kong of Kualar Lumpur, another 12 hours to Europe.

I think the trips I took were in wide bodies because the planes then went on to North America or Europe.

Had never even thought of this until this thread
I assume you live in Sydney because SYD-SIN is 3395 nautical miles. (SYD-HKG is 3980 nm)

Manila to Sydney (3371 nautical miles) is the longest commercial route in the world on a single aisle jet (an A321neo).


Sydney is just far away from everything. Boston to Dublin is only 2601 nm, which is not terribly farther than BOS-SFO=2350 nm.
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