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Old 11-20-2017, 10:12 AM
 
909 posts, read 667,965 times
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NYC is an international city and quite possibly the most well known city in the world (got to be in the top 3). Of course a traveler would still visit NYC no matter where else they went to in the USA. The problem with the other thread is that there should have been a qualifier. If one is on a limited budget or travel time, does it make sense to still visit Chicago instead of somewhere else if one has already visited NYC? I get why a Chicago native would be offended with the question but by the standards of this forum, its a fair question. Flipping the question around implies an equivalency that simply does not exist. NYC is an iconic city in a way that Chicago is not, regardless of whether or not one personally prefers Chicago. One can visit NYC and say they hated it, but you're still going to be glad you went to find out for yourself.
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
956 posts, read 1,775,158 times
Reputation: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koji7 View Post
That’s an opinion! I don’t share it but it doesn’t really matter. I don’t know about everyone else but I would love to meet some of the keyboard warriors here in person.
I see what gladhands is saying, and Chicago is like a smaller version of NYC. At the same time, I totally understand that some people in NYC and other parts of the northeast have a superiority complex over the rest of the country. Although let's be honest, you REALLY are missing out if you don't try to do a trip to Chicago and other parts of the Midwest at least once or twice in your lifetime. And I'd challenge those people to also consider visiting other places too, such as Milwaukee, WI, Grand Rapids, Indianapolis(yes seriously), Detroit(also seriously, the city has been starting to make a little comeback in recent years too), Columbus, OH, Cincinnati, Minneapolis, to name a few of many examples. I'd also advise seeing some of the smaller cities and towns, such as La Crosse, WI(plus anywhere else along US 61 or Wisconsin Hwy. 35 paralleling the Mississippi River wouldn't disappoint), Monroe, WI(check out the cheese stores if you go there), to name many more examples I could but didn't have time to post here. About to do some real life things for the day today, so take care guys for now. It'll be fun to see the responses on this thread later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by whogoesthere View Post
NYC is an international city and quite possibly the most well known city in the world (got to be in the top 3). Of course a traveler would still visit NYC no matter where else they went to in the USA. The problem with the other thread is that there should have been a qualifier. If one is on a limited budget or travel time, does it make sense to still visit Chicago instead of somewhere else if one has already visited NYC? I get why a Chicago native would be offended with the question but by the standards of this forum, its a fair question. Flipping the question around implies an equivalency that simply does not exist. NYC is an iconic city in a way that Chicago is not, regardless of whether or not one personally prefers Chicago. One can visit NYC and say they hated it, but you're still going to be glad you went to find out for yourself.
Yep, you also get it too. I can totally understand a traveler who goes to NYC and just focuses on doing some side trips to other nearby cities in the northeast(i.e. New Haven, Boston, Philly, Baltimore, DC), over Chicago if they only have so much time to see the US. After all, the US is VERY spread out, to the point that I'm sure that it definitely throws off a lot of visitors when they make early travel plans in their head, before researching those travel ideas further.
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:14 AM
 
Location: mo county md
567 posts, read 329,909 times
Reputation: 727
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonySegaTendo617 View Post
This poster gets it. Kudos to you!



That would be nice, but sadly I'm not holding my breath it'll happen. Save for maybe a few corporate executive job relocations to this area due to more companies moving their corporate offices to the Chicago area, the only way a lot of declined population city neighborhoods(i.e. Lawndale, Roseland, Englewood, Grand Crossing) and places just outside of Chicago(i.e. Gary, IN(though I do like its Miller neighborhood), Harvey, Maywood) to come back would be reinvestment in them again. With most factory jobs already evaporated away in the past few decades, I doubt that'll occur. Back in October of this year during Open House Chicago(an architectural open house throughout the Chicago area), I had a sad reminder of this trend when I toured the former Schulze Baking Company bread plant on 55th Street east of I-90/94, and west of the still nice Hyde Park neighborhood. The new owner of Schulze is trying to renovate the building from a bread baking plant that used to employ 1500 people at its peak into a data and cloud computing center, and hopefully his dream to renovate the building into that will happen. It needs a little renovation work for that to occur, and hopefully it occurs in the future. Also since I have urbexed abandoned buildings in various places, I have seen former factories elsewhere in worse shape than Schulze. Once the water leaks in the former truck loading area are fixed, I don't think renovating this building will be a problem.



Good for you guys. We have cool scenic places outside the Chicago area too, such as Starved Rock State Park, Matthiessen(sp?) State Park, Mississippi Palisades State Park(this one is underrated IMO), any of the dunes state and national parks on Lake Michigan east of Chicago(i.e. Indiana Dunes, Warren Dunes), Galena, IL, to name just a few examples. And of course, scenic areas are a dime a dozen in nearby states like Michigan and Wisconsin. Even northeast Iowa(don't forget to stop in Dubuque and also Dyersville for the Field of Dreams movie filming site, if you head that way), southwest Minnesota and southeast Minnesota are nice and hilly as well, and IMO those 3 parts are hidden gems to drive to and check out. Check out google street view for yourself, and you'll see how darned scenic US Highway 61, and Wisconsin Highway 35 paralleling the Mississippi River are to drive on. Also some nice small cities and towns in that area, such as La Crosse, WI, Red Wing, MN, and Prairie du Chien, WI. I can't forget to mention nice cities and towns that aren't right along the Mississippi River, such as Rochester, MN, Decorah, IA, Monroe, WI, and Savanna, IL.

I think a certain few C-D posters overestimate in their heads that Chicagoians and NYC residents obsess about the various differences between the 2 places. Honestly, I do NOT think much about those differences at all, and I live in Chicago! Have been to NYC twice, and it is just more dense, more populated(dunno by how much, and the exact times(2X, 2.5X?) bigger NYC is doesn't matter to me), and obviously more diverse than Chicago. Besides the fact NYC does do some foods better or differently than Chicago, such as bagels, thin crust pizza(though Chicago does have numerous decent thin crust pizza places too that the media greatly underreports about, so this is more like a draw), and egg cream drinks. I don't believe I've seen egg cream drinks anywhere in Chicago, and if I'm wrong Chicagoians and at least 1 or 2 places exist here serving this(dunno, maybe Eleven City Diner? hadn't eaten there and also looked at their menu online, and did not spot this on their menu unless I missed it somehow), let me know in a thread response. Since I'd like to see how their versions compare, if any local places serving an egg cream drink exist in Chicago. Just like how we do certain things better or differently than NYC, such as hot dogs, deep dish pizza(and don't be afraid to try it if you visit, though I'd steer clear of Giordano's and go to Lou Malnati's or any of the other deep dish restaurants), and Italian Beef sandwiches. And *GASP*, we even have good thin crust pizza places worth trying here too if by some chance you don't go for deep dish, such as Piece Pizzeria(good beer they brew on their own too), Vito and Nick's(of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives fame), Candlelite(not nationally famous, but it's only a short trip from Evanston, IL on the Chicago side of the border if you're that far north, on Western(called Asbury in Evanston) south of Howard), to name just a few of many such places that exist.

I applaud all the posters in this thread that respect the differences between Chicago and NYC, such as Bluefox. And IMO, both are worth visiting. I understand why if a foreign visitor has little time to go to the US, and knowing how spread apart US cities are, why they'll prioritize seeing NYC over Chicago.
Chicago definitely fixates more on NY than vice versa, though no one here will ever agree.

No beef, but this reads like a fairly superficial interpretation of NY, which to be fair could be expected from someone that's only been twice.

Don't wanna waste too much time dissecting but a couple things...If people prefer Chicago deep dish to NY that's one thing, but the thin crust pizza here is nowhere near NY's level (and I enjoy the tavern style). Also the palisades are right across the river, whereas you're namedropping places like Dubuque that are a good three hours from the chi.
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:15 AM
 
Location: East Coast
474 posts, read 274,778 times
Reputation: 562
I’m a New Yorker, but I love traveling to Chicago and to me they’re world’s different.
But that’s been hashed here ad nauseum. No one is going to change the minds of someone else when it comes to things like this.

My favorite things about Chicago are the great people and the amazing food and countless things to do. Love the hotels, I also like exploring the neighborhoods and the cool architecture. Skyline? I get enough of that already. NYC has something like 6-7,000 high rises that’s enough.

I’ve got a conference in Chicago in December and I hope for good weather. Peace.
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,894 posts, read 6,538,445 times
Reputation: 5367
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonySegaTendo617 View Post
This poster gets it. Kudos to you!



That would be nice, but sadly I'm not holding my breath it'll happen. Save for maybe a few corporate executive job relocations to this area due to more companies moving their corporate offices to the Chicago area, the only way a lot of declined population city neighborhoods(i.e. Lawndale, Roseland, Englewood, Grand Crossing) and places just outside of Chicago(i.e. Gary, IN(though I do like its Miller neighborhood), Harvey, Maywood) to come back would be reinvestment in them again. With most factory jobs already evaporated away in the past few decades, I doubt that'll occur. Back in October of this year during Open House Chicago(an architectural open house throughout the Chicago area), I had a sad reminder of this trend when I toured the former Schulze Baking Company bread plant on 55th Street east of I-90/94, and west of the still nice Hyde Park neighborhood. The new owner of Schulze is trying to renovate the building from a bread baking plant that used to employ 1500 people at its peak into a data and cloud computing center, and hopefully his dream to renovate the building into that will happen. It needs a little renovation work for that to occur, and hopefully it occurs in the future. Also since I have urbexed abandoned buildings in various places, I have seen former factories elsewhere in worse shape than Schulze. Once the water leaks in the former truck loading area are fixed, I don't think renovating this building will be a problem.



Good for you guys. We have cool scenic places outside the Chicago area too, such as Starved Rock State Park, Matthiessen(sp?) State Park, Mississippi Palisades State Park(this one is underrated IMO), any of the dunes state and national parks on Lake Michigan east of Chicago(i.e. Indiana Dunes, Warren Dunes), Galena, IL, to name just a few examples. And of course, scenic areas are a dime a dozen in nearby states like Michigan and Wisconsin. Even northeast Iowa(don't forget to stop in Dubuque and also Dyersville for the Field of Dreams movie filming site, if you head that way), southwest Minnesota and southeast Minnesota are nice and hilly as well, and IMO those 3 parts are hidden gems to drive to and check out. Check out google street view for yourself, and you'll see how darned scenic US Highway 61, and Wisconsin Highway 35 paralleling the Mississippi River are to drive on. Also some nice small cities and towns in that area, such as La Crosse, WI, Red Wing, MN, and Prairie du Chien, WI. I can't forget to mention nice cities and towns that aren't right along the Mississippi River, such as Rochester, MN, Decorah, IA, Monroe, WI, and Savanna, IL.

I think a certain few C-D posters overestimate in their heads that Chicagoians and NYC residents obsess about the various differences between the 2 places. Honestly, I do NOT think much about those differences at all, and I live in Chicago! Have been to NYC twice, and it is just more dense, more populated(dunno by how much, and the exact times(2X, 2.5X?) bigger NYC is doesn't matter to me), and obviously more diverse than Chicago. Besides the fact NYC does do some foods better or differently than Chicago, such as bagels, thin crust pizza(though Chicago does have numerous decent thin crust pizza places too that the media greatly underreports about, so this is more like a draw), and egg cream drinks. I don't believe I've seen egg cream drinks anywhere in Chicago, and if I'm wrong Chicagoians and at least 1 or 2 places exist here serving this(dunno, maybe Eleven City Diner? hadn't eaten there and also looked at their menu online, and did not spot this on their menu unless I missed it somehow), let me know in a thread response. Since I'd like to see how their versions compare, if any local places serving an egg cream drink exist in Chicago. Just like how we do certain things better or differently than NYC, such as hot dogs, deep dish pizza(and don't be afraid to try it if you visit, though I'd steer clear of Giordano's and go to Lou Malnati's or any of the other deep dish restaurants), and Italian Beef sandwiches. And *GASP*, we even have good thin crust pizza places worth trying here too if by some chance you don't go for deep dish, such as Piece Pizzeria(good beer they brew on their own too), Vito and Nick's(of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives fame), Candlelite(not nationally famous, but it's only a short trip from Evanston, IL on the Chicago side of the border if you're that far north, on Western(called Asbury in Evanston) south of Howard), to name just a few of many such places that exist.

I applaud all the posters in this thread that respect the differences between Chicago and NYC, such as Bluefox. And IMO, both are worth visiting. I understand why if a foreign visitor has little time to go to the US, and knowing how spread apart US cities are, why they'll prioritize seeing NYC over Chicago.
Great post. As for deep dish pizza, you were spot on for Giordans (don't) and Lou's (do). My suggstion: either Had no's or Due's downtown or any Lou's location.

From a Chicago perspective, I'd say we see our city as unique. We don't any need to compare to other cities for our greatness speaks for itself. Chicago sees itself like its fellow great cities, like Bostn, New York, Washington, Los Angeles and San francisco. We respect them, enjoy them, but feel nO need to cmpare ourslves to them? I mean: CHICAGO is CHICAGO. Nuff said. What's impressive is not how others see us, but how we see oursselves.
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:27 AM
 
642 posts, read 263,096 times
Reputation: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
You seem to have this weird fixation with density, especially when it comes to Chicago. Period Chicago mandated that alleys be built on every street, and that buildings be detached. That was a knee-jerk reaction to a fire that destroyed most of the city. In terms of lived experience, Chicago is more similar to New York than any other city in the country.
From a downtown urban experience Chicago is much closer to San Fran, Boston, philly, D.C. than it is to NYC although it may be a step up from all those. The gap is much larger from NYC to Chicago than Chicago to those other cities mainly because of density. NYC is closer to Hong Kong in this regard. Hustle, bustle people everywhere for miles is unmatched in the states
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:32 AM
 
642 posts, read 263,096 times
Reputation: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
NYC is unique, but Chicago is most similar. Both can be true.
Skylines yes it is most the same. Personality of city I think it's closer to Boston or philly. Chicago has a great skyline and I love the city but I don't think there's another place in the country more fixated on its skyline
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:55 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,312 posts, read 2,585,056 times
Reputation: 1648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne999 View Post
From a downtown urban experience Chicago is much closer to San Fran, Boston, philly, D.C. than it is to NYC although it may be a step up from all those. The gap is much larger from NYC to Chicago than Chicago to those other cities mainly because of density. NYC is closer to Hong Kong in this regard. Hustle, bustle people everywhere for miles is unmatched in the states
Density shmensity. You will be enlightened to learn from gladhands that density is just a number on a piece of paper. It has no correlation whatsoever to vibrancy, concentration of amenities, built environment or proximity to public transit.
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Old 11-20-2017, 11:11 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,362 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne999 View Post
From a downtown urban experience Chicago is much closer to San Fran, Boston, philly, D.C. than it is to NYC although it may be a step up from all those. The gap is much larger from NYC to Chicago than Chicago to those other cities mainly because of density. NYC is closer to Hong Kong in this regard. Hustle, bustle people everywhere for miles is unmatched in the states
It's hard to compare HK to NYC because their urban form is so different. A lot of HK pedestrian activity is centered in the metro(=subway) where a lot of the shopping plazas are. I think London or Paris are better comparisons. NYC is bigger, but functionally the same size in the cores.
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Old 11-20-2017, 11:29 AM
 
7,707 posts, read 4,569,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
It's hard to compare HK to NYC because their urban form is so different. A lot of HK pedestrian activity is centered in the metro(=subway) where a lot of the shopping plazas are. I think London or Paris are better comparisons. NYC is bigger, but functionally the same size in the cores.
I havenít been to Hong Kong, but neither in London nor Paris reminded me of New York. Truthfully, Seoul feels more like NYC than any European city Iíve visited.
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