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Old 12-31-2017, 08:13 AM
 
3,196 posts, read 1,813,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastFlatbush View Post
It's terrible--and I'm speaking not as a tourist but from someone who lives in a tourist city, NYC.

Mass Tourism has definitely spun out of control to the point where it's had a detrimental impact on the quality of life here for locals. Because tourists are looking for cheap thrills and familiarity, NYC locations like Times Square has basically become an open air mall filled with the same national and international chains as anywhere else, and the entire city has developed a cheesy, artificial Las Vegas/Mall of America vibe. Nothing feels like the real NYC anymore.

And some of our better, off-the-beaten path locations have become so choked with tourists that they've been ruined. We have two riverside parks that used to be wonderful places for people to just chill out and enjoy peace and quiet. Now they're crazy packed. And I don't mean in the way that you'd expect for any popular tourist attraction. I mean insanely packed like you see in some really densely populated Third World cities, a human swarm. Yes, it's wonderful to have people around but there's a difference between bustling crowds and grotesque.

Having so many tourists also resulted in problems we never had before, like people putting locks on the Brooklyn Bridge, streets becoming clogged with traffic or groups of tourists wandering in droves into residential areas looking for locations they've seen on TV shows.

This type of situation is getting so bad here in NYC and around the world that some cities are losing their native populations. Venetians have been fleeing in droves because they can no longer handle the mass tourism there.



I have no doubt that many New Yorkers have decided to flee NYC for the same reason. It's not NYC anymore.
So you miss the old school Times Square filled with hookers, muggers, porn shops, armed homeless, and urine-soaked doorways? Don't look for a lot of company at your pity party. Some things have actually changed for the better, and Times Square is one of them.
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Old 12-31-2017, 10:18 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,904 posts, read 1,583,756 times
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Well the fact is no native, adult NYer goes to Times Square ever unless he has out of town visitors who have never seen the lights at night, etc.... All those people wandering around TS are from Peoria, Kansas, Brasil, London, Hong Kong, Texas, etc.... Thats why there are hardly any good restaurants in that nabe: no repeat business so get them in/ get them out places like Chilis, Olive Garden, Ruby Foos, etc... dominate. It's not a neighborhood, it's a giant transit area now.

I think most savvy NYers leave most of Manhattan to the tourists, new college grads & the rich now, it's like a gated community for them other than some neighborhoods on the fringes. Brooklyn & Queens is where the "real NY" is now, at least for the time being...
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Old 12-31-2017, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,631 posts, read 963,006 times
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Moab, Utah has transformed from a small mining town to a BIG recreation center. Arches, Canyonlands are a short drive away. The Jeepers and mountain bike folks have crowded the locals out. We were there during an October which we thought we be off season. No, July and August are due to the heat.

There is “The Wave” in Northern Arizona that, because of its popularity and fragility, has a permit system that only allows 20 visitors a day. You are competing with the world for these permits. It is on BLM land and is not a national park.

Our national parks have become crowded due to international travel. First it was the busload of German travelers who would disgorge from the bus smoking and flinging their butts. Now, it is the Asians who ask everyone to take their picture. Acchhh!

So, having been to just about every national park west of the Rockies, we instead explore BLM and USFS areas. There are some beautiful areas in the West where you see very few people. I am keeping them secret because I don't want the hoards to follow. We camp in our truck camper, a pop up, that can handle the rough roads. One of the coolest things we encountered was a cattle drive right by our free boondock campsite. A grandfather and his grandson rounding up the cows and calves to move them to new pastures on horseback. We saw no one except for a rancher or two for several days exploring ghost towns in central Nevada. I would imagine they were surprised to see us, too.

Its out there, the solitude and authentic experience. You just have to go off the beaten path. When i tell people our plans, they ask where us that? Last October, we traveled to the Wallowas, Owyhees, and the Snake River Canyon area and points in between. We spent under $600 for 3 weeks of travel which was mainly fuel. Camp fees were $55 as we mainly boondock plus prepping our meals in the camper, rather than dining out is not counted as we do that at home. World class scenery without the crowds.

Last edited by xPlorer48; 12-31-2017 at 01:55 PM.. Reason: Spellcheck
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Old 12-31-2017, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Central Indiana/Indy metro area
1,501 posts, read 2,324,074 times
Reputation: 1430
Quote:
Originally Posted by clikrf8 View Post
Moab, Utah has transformed from a small mining town to a BIG recreation center. Arches, Canyonlands are a short drive away. The Jeepers and mountain bike folks have crowded the locals out. We were there during an October which we thought we be off season. No, July and August are due to the heat.

Our national parks have become crowded due to international travel. First it was the busload of German travelers who would disgorge from the bus smoking and flinging their butts. Now, it is the Asians who ask everyone to take their picture. Acchhh!

So, having been to just about every national park west of the Rockies, we instead explore BLM and USFS areas. There are some beautiful areas in the West where you see very few people.

Its out there, the solitude and authentic experience. You just have to go off the beaten path. When i tell people our plans, they ask where us that?
It is a shame about some places. My wife and I went to Moab about four years ago. A two week Grand Circle trip. I got little hiking in, but did get some in and plan on going back. We went in October, which I wouldn't do again because it gets cold enough in the elevation that snow is more likely. We were unable to drive UT-12 because I wasn't sure how bad the snow was up in the mountains.

The key to almost all these crowded places now: Get going early, pretty early. I left Moab and drove to the Needles District of Canyonlands to do some short hikes and such. Minimal traffic on the road. I got to the visitor's center and there were only a handful of people there. The three or four short trails I hiked it was just me or maybe a handful of others. Most people won't wake up early and/or they have kids and it is just too hard to get everyone up. Plus, kids and young adults usually want to stay up late vs waking up early.

My prediction is that most of the popular national parks and such will be very regulated in the coming years. There are just too many people for the NPS to deal with it. Fully funding the NPS (well, what they claim they need) would like only make things worse. I mean would the NPS build more lodges, parking garages, etc. to accommodate the masses? Would they actually hire law enforcement rangers and mandate they hold people accountable (like walking off boardwalks, using drones, etc.)? I predict some sort of mix of forced mass transit, a lottery system, daily entry closures after so many vehicles, etc..
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Old 12-31-2017, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,631 posts, read 963,006 times
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And, now, we have an administration that is culling national monuments. Bears Ears, Grand Staircase, Cascades Siskiyous and more where one can travel for solitude, are being reduced. We need more areas to recreate than we have. The milennials, from what I have read, are enthused about the outdoors. It may be part of the reason the tech companies are in Salt Lake City, Seattle, Denver which are cities near recreational opportunities.

They are already considering a lottery or permit system for some of the more popular national parks. I can’t remember which, maybe Zion?

The state parks are another alternative although some of the more popular ones ate seeing upticks in popularity like Valley of Fire in Nevada due to commerciaks being filmed there.

There are just too many people, period.
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Old 12-31-2017, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 352,629 times
Reputation: 885
Quote:
Originally Posted by indy_317 View Post
It is a shame about some places. My wife and I went to Moab about four years ago. A two week Grand Circle trip. I got little hiking in, but did get some in and plan on going back. We went in October, which I wouldn't do again because it gets cold enough in the elevation that snow is more likely. We were unable to drive UT-12 because I wasn't sure how bad the snow was up in the mountains.

The key to almost all these crowded places now: Get going early, pretty early. I left Moab and drove to the Needles District of Canyonlands to do some short hikes and such. Minimal traffic on the road. I got to the visitor's center and there were only a handful of people there. The three or four short trails I hiked it was just me or maybe a handful of others. Most people won't wake up early and/or they have kids and it is just too hard to get everyone up. Plus, kids and young adults usually want to stay up late vs waking up early.

My prediction is that most of the popular national parks and such will be very regulated in the coming years. There are just too many people for the NPS to deal with it. Fully funding the NPS (well, what they claim they need) would like only make things worse. I mean would the NPS build more lodges, parking garages, etc. to accommodate the masses? Would they actually hire law enforcement rangers and mandate they hold people accountable (like walking off boardwalks, using drones, etc.)? I predict some sort of mix of forced mass transit, a lottery system, daily entry closures after so many vehicles, etc..
Royal National Park, on the southern fringe of Sydney was the second park of its type in the world, after Yellowstone. Although it doesn't really have a lot of iconic attractions is it extremely busy for picnics and so on especially on public holidays such as Christmas Day and today, being New Years Day. When the car parks are full, basically the park is closed except for through traffic. The information is on the traffic control billboards all over the city. So I know that this afternoon it is full despite quite windy weather.
We are staying in Moab next May, over Memorial Day. Trouble is when you are travelling, you have to be somewhere on a day like that. I decided to allocate an extra day for Moab, now three days, so that we will hopefully still be able to see the area. Reading about the southern Utah parks, it seems that like in Europe, there has an influx of Asian tourists causing pressure on facilities.
How early in the day would you advise starting out? In Sydney everyone seems to get going earlier and earlier. Some of the coffee shops are opening at 5am these days. In Moab will shops and so on be closed on Memorial Day?
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Old 12-31-2017, 11:57 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,558 posts, read 3,656,219 times
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There are world-class, bucket list spots that will always be crowded and pricey. The few that I've been to were crowded but I allotted more time there rather than less. The off peak hours are nice in some places. Sunrise in Venice is nice. A night stroll in Cusco is memorable. Sometimes you have to stand in line. The Grand Canyon in late December is empty of most tourists and beautiful in snow.


At other times I pick places less touristy and spend several days absorbing the place. It can also serve as a base to explore other places nearby. I recall sitting in a sidewalk cafe on about the 4th day in a hill town in Italy and watching a busload of American tourists sprint past to snap photos of a 12th century fountain and then sprint back to the bus. I don't think they knew what town it was and certainly wouldn't remember when they were back home. For me, the gelato was wonderful and I could find that spot today if I had to.
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Old 01-01-2018, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,631 posts, read 963,006 times
Reputation: 3804
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
Royal National Park, on the southern fringe of Sydney was the second park of its type in the world, after Yellowstone. Although it doesn't really have a lot of iconic attractions is it extremely busy for picnics and so on especially on public holidays such as Christmas Day and today, being New Years Day. When the car parks are full, basically the park is closed except for through traffic. The information is on the traffic control billboards all over the city. So I know that this afternoon it is full despite quite windy weather.
We are staying in Moab next May, over Memorial Day. Trouble is when you are travelling, you have to be somewhere on a day like that. I decided to allocate an extra day for Moab, now three days, so that we will hopefully still be able to see the area. Reading about the southern Utah parks, it seems that like in Europe, there has an influx of Asian tourists causing pressure on facilities.
How early in the day would you advise starting out? In Sydney everyone seems to get going earlier and earlier. Some of the coffee shops are opening at 5am these days. In Moab will shops and so on be closed on Memorial Day?
Early. Are you hiking, mountain biking, 4x4? Try for the lesser used trails. May will be warm. Have fun above all.
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Old 01-01-2018, 02:43 AM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 352,629 times
Reputation: 885
Quote:
Originally Posted by clikrf8 View Post
Early. Are you hiking, mountain biking, 4x4? Try for the lesser used trails. May will be warm. Have fun above all.
Hiking and general sightseeing. Yes, really looking forward to it. We will get going early anyway. Husband is a golfer and he is hitting off at 7 17am tomorrow. He plays at least three times a week so it has gotten us in the habit of getting up early since we retired.
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Old 01-01-2018, 05:10 AM
 
3,274 posts, read 3,691,758 times
Reputation: 5434
There are way too many American tourists in Europe.
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