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Old 01-12-2018, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Australia
8,034 posts, read 2,819,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanms3030 View Post
am I the only one that went to Highgate Cemetery? I appreciate the fact that I had locals as tour guides when I was there
I used to live nearby so have been there a few times. It's great for people who have a special interest in cemeteries and/or the people buried there, but unless the OP's three 20-something guys have those interests, I wouldn't recommend it. They only have 6 days and the cemetery is a bit out of the centre of London and needs a few hours to fully appreciate.
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Old 01-12-2018, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Harbor Springs, Michigan
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Since you are travelling with youngsters how about 221b Baker Street? Home of Sherlock Holmes museum.

Trying to think of activities, places to visit that would interest younger folks.

If you are interested in a day trip to Oxford you don't have to join a tour, there are busses that run every 15 minutes or so from London Victoria to the center of Oxford (make sure you get the bus to Gloucester Green). Tickets cost @ 15.00.
Oxford is a very walkable city, home to the oldest English speaking University in the world, many of the colleges are open to visitors. Lots of good places to stop and eat including the Eagle and Child in St.Giles, this was the pub where Tolkien, C.S.Lewis and friends collectively known as The Inklings would gather to discuss and write. The food there is excellent.
As previously mentioned the Bodlian library is interesting to visit (Harry Potter connections)
The end of May is graduation time so the city is usually very vibrant, lots of pop up plays and music, a good time of year to visit.

Oh p.s. I'm Oxford born and bred, lived there through my younger years, alas I only get to go back to visit my parents graves now as most of my family have scattered to other parts of the country. I still love a walk down the high, through the Catte past the Radcliffe Camera to Broad Street. When mum worked in Oxford we would often have lunch in the quad of Blaliol college, lovely peaceful place to sit and watch on a warm sunny day. One benefit of taking the bus for yourself is that you won't be on a tour timetable so you can make the day as long or as short as you wish.
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Old 01-13-2018, 01:20 AM
 
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I plan on visiting London next vacation trip around my birthday.

I'm thinking of one of those hop on hop off bus things they have, then maybe a guided tour to Stonehedge.

Nothing too crazy.
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Old 01-13-2018, 03:22 AM
 
1,528 posts, read 907,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bachslunch View Post
I’d also save Paris for another time. It’s another world class city you can easily spend more than a week seeing. Doing it as a day trip from London shortens you a day there and barely scratches the surface of Paris.
Absolutely. Just because you can do Paris in a day from London doesn't mean you should. I've done this for work but would never consider it for pleasure (because it would not be much pleasure).

Many people grossly underestimate the time and effort to make this trip. Everyone says '2 hours' but that's not door to door. Obviously the lead time, etc is not as great as with flying but you do need to get to the train station and have enough contingency time built in in case you mess up or tubes, trains, etc are delayed on your journey to St Pancras and on the other end in Gare du Nord.

To me, it's like suggesting taking a day trip to Boston when visiting NYC. That's under 3.5 hours driving. Eurostar to Paris is 2 hours 15 minutes plus I'd leave roughly 1 hour to get to the station, get through security and leave enough contingency for any delays or other problems finding your way. You could shave this down if you are staying closer to St Pancras and/or know your way around london very well. So we probably can agree on just over 3 hours total. Pretty similar to NYC to Boston and back in a day.
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Old 01-13-2018, 05:18 AM
 
544 posts, read 251,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
First of all, I haven't visited London in 45 years... time flies ETA: Wait, I remember now passing through a weekend "only" 35 years ago!

But even with that perspective my MO is usually to see just a couple of tourist sights - your list - & spend the bulk of the time in non touristy neighborhoods where the hoi polloi live & play & go to those pubs, cafes, restos, & do lots of random walks. Even in 1972 the changing of the guard was ridiculously mobbed, but I was young enough to climb halfway up the base of a statue to see above the heads of the crowd, & I was 6' then. I would probably go to the British Museum, a show, see if any good music is playing at any concert halls or pubs, I heard good things about the War Museum years ago; Westminister Abbey & its neighborhood.

I would want to find the best old school fish & chips shop; maybe do a historical walking tour; find a good local pub with a nice crowd to drink a bit too much warm beer; perhaps get a reservation at some famous chef restaurant like St John; Borough market; find a few good curry houses... Find the London equivalent of an off-Broadway show...
I totally agree with this. It has been many years since I was last in London with my teenage, daughter---we would spend the morning seeing an attraction then split up after lunch to do our own thing, meeting back in the evening for dinner.

She was a shopper---I'm not----so she enjoyed seeking out flea markets and interesting little shops and I enjoyed seeking out local color.
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Old 01-13-2018, 09:28 AM
 
Location: SW France
14,258 posts, read 14,144,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
I plan on visiting London next vacation trip around my birthday.

I'm thinking of one of those hop on hop off bus things they have, then maybe a guided tour to Stonehedge.

Nothing too crazy.

That's quite funny!
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Old 01-13-2018, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Boston
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HOHO bus is a great way to spend your first day getting the lay of the land.
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Old 01-18-2018, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Great Britain
11,649 posts, read 3,988,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanms3030 View Post
am I the only one that went to Highgate Cemetery? I appreciate the fact that I had locals as tour guides when I was there
Highgate is one of the magnificent seven, a collection of very old and impressive Victorian Gothic Graveyards.

Magnificent Seven cemeteries - Wikipedia

Magnificent Seven Cemeteries - Atlas Obscura

An Interactive Map Of London's Magnificent Seven Cemeteries - Londonist

There are numerous other famous graveyards in London and of course there is the famous London Necropolis at Brookwood in Surrey, which had it's own railway track and station for the dead. Even in death there were 1st, 2nd and 3rd class tickets which also dictated where you would be buried at the London Necropolis at Brookwood.

London Necropolis Railway - Wikipedia

London Necropolis railway station - Wikipedia

Brookwood Cemetery - Wikipedia
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Old 01-18-2018, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Great Britain
11,649 posts, read 3,988,570 times
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Here's the top UK Attractions in two columns, one for those that you have to pay to get in and the other for those that are free.

Annual Survey of Visits to Visitor Attractions: Latest results - Visit Britain
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Old 01-18-2018, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,879 posts, read 1,406,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
Here's the top UK Attractions in two columns, one for those that you have to pay to get in and the other for those that are free.

Annual Survey of Visits to Visitor Attractions: Latest results - Visit Britain
thanks, this is great
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