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Old 01-15-2018, 02:58 PM
 
659 posts, read 324,436 times
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I travel a lot with English speaking tour groups. I have been to places and have had interactions where you get a definite vibe that Americans are not welcome or are undesirable tourists. Anyway, I have a few of experiences:
1. In Morocco, traveling with a 14 person tour group of women, men everywhere at mint tea houses sitting outside smoking and frowning at our group.
2. On a bus tour passing through Germany, stopping at rest stops and being treated rudely by cashiers as you try to purchase something without speaking German.
3. In Paris at the Moulin Rouge, rude waiters, and being herded like cattle in lines and packed into tiny tables; requests ignored.
4. From tour guides, making sneaky snide comments about Americans, e.g. In China, tour guide kept referring to Americans as "Big Nose"; On a tour through Europe, Tour Guide insinuating Americans are too demanding and are expected to be big tippers more than Australians.
5. Stopping on a cruise in Bahamas, where frowning vendors were rude and suck their teeth if you say not interested.

Have you visited places where you you felt unwelcome or singled out because you were American or simply just for being a tourist?
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Old 01-15-2018, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Bellmawr, New Jersey
272 posts, read 115,379 times
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Haven't been, but I heard to stay far away from Sinaloa, Mexico.

If I spelled that wrong, I apologize.
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Old 01-15-2018, 03:28 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
39,359 posts, read 2,970,878 times
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No, but I try to be polite & respectful, which is something I can't say about all American tourists. Are you sure the big nose, wasn't the big noise, many Americans talk far too loudly, both at home & abroad.

I remember one time, we were on a guided tour in Sicily, when we got to Palermo, the local tour guide met us & took us around several interesting spots, we had been expecting to go inside the Church/Cathedral, but someone had died & there was a funeral in progress. She asked us to be respectful & not go into the Church until the funeral was over. We went off & had a coffee, however the rest of the bus or at least 25 people trotted into the Church with their cameras, I found that so disrespectful.

I find as long as I am polite, respectful & friendly, not loud & overbearing, I get on fine. I also do not complain if things are not done the same way as at home. Don't complain about the bacon, or lack of face tissues in room etc.
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Old 01-15-2018, 03:54 PM
 
1,172 posts, read 477,617 times
Reputation: 1927
I don’t doubt there are people who dislike tourists, folks in the industry who make fun of their clients, or vendors who get annoyed when you won’t buy what they’re selling. Frankly, I don’t care — it’s their problem, not mine. I try my best to be a respectful person and a proverbial ambassador of good will when I travel, but it doesn’t always translate to a welcome feeling from others. So be it.

For vendors, touts, and such folks, it’s my money to spend as I choose. Some may not like it if I don’t choose to spend it with them and convey that dislike, hoping to guilt me into doing so anyway. Too bad.
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Old 01-15-2018, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 352,498 times
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1. Cultural, they often expect women to be more at home so it would be a group of women out and about, not necessarily American.
2. The cashiers are impatient and can't be bothered to be helpful. Happens many places which are inundated with tourists.
3. Waiters are impatient and have been doing the job too long.
4. Technique to elicit even bigger tips. They know Australians won't tip very much as it is not our culture. Won't have much effect to try to encourage us but better chance it will work with you. Service is not very good in Australia so our expectations are not too high.
5. Common technique of vendors, not just relating to Americans.

We have a holiday apartment in Northern Australia. Our previous manager was actually American background and told us some differences in expectations with the guests. Australians, the majority, just want the keys to the apartment and prefer the luggage to be delivered before they arrive. They are happy to find where everything is themselves and settle themselves in. The Americans , especially in the upmarket villas, expect to be taken on a tour of the apartment, have their bags delivered to the appropriate bedrooms and so on. In return they often give a large tip. The staff would fight over the role of delivering the bags to the Americans. So they are more than welcome here!

Keep in mind that in many countries with higher unemployment than America and indeed Australia, which is a lot of Europe, people may be working in hospitality not because they want to but because not much else is available. They get jaded and bored.
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Old 01-15-2018, 04:33 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,462 posts, read 3,634,340 times
Reputation: 19472
Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyJuly View Post


3. In Paris at the Moulin Rouge, rude waiters, and being herded like cattle in lines and packed into tiny tables; requests ignored.
This. I would never go back to Paris, not just because of the animosity towards Americans, but the city was dirty and polluted, and street vendors trying to push people to buy things. It's a shame. I'm sure it was a beautiful city perhaps fifty years ago.
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Old 01-15-2018, 04:35 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,462 posts, read 3,634,340 times
Reputation: 19472
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
Keep in mind that in many countries with higher unemployment than America and indeed Australia, which is a lot of Europe, people may be working in hospitality not because they want to but because not much else is available. They get jaded and bored.
I see this a lot, even in the USA, where lots of people in the service industry are rude, or even hostile to customers, simply because they hate their jobs and feel that they failed in life. It's sad. I understand but I think they should realize that without the customers, they wouldn't be getting paid.
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Old 01-15-2018, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,576 posts, read 11,065,012 times
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I think it's more along the lines of: Large groups are a pain. They are a larger pain when they don't speak your language. Increase the level of pain when they don't speak your language and then are demanding, yet unable to communicate.

I see cruise, tour group, guided tour, guide, tour. I'm sensing the root of your problem.

I guess what I'm saying is it's not them, it's you.
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Old 01-15-2018, 05:02 PM
 
1,528 posts, read 903,737 times
Reputation: 2062
The whole 'American tourist' thing is blown far out of proportion. Let's use Europe as an example. Americans account for a relatively low percentage of tourists in Europe. Most tourists in Europe are other Europeans. Perhaps in the 50s and 60s, Americans were more in number relative to Europeans who were still recovering from the war and did not travel in mass. They were likely also much more visible. They had money. They were rays of optimism and innocence in grey post war Europe. Perhaps annoyed a few people. That was 60-70 years ago. Also, Americans were the main English speakers as Brits didn't start traveling in mass to Europe until maybe 40 years or so ago...probably more like 30 years. Now everyone speaks English in Europe (that's what someone from Italy speaks when they visit the Netherlands, for example). You don't have to be ashamed of speaking English or have some perverse idea that English = American.

Today, many American tourists to Europe are far too paranoid about being 'ugly Americans'. So they talk in hushed tones. Some run around apologizing for Trump or whatever the latest thing they think will endear them with Europeans. European tourists are hardly saints and I won't stereotype here but when you hear a group of foreign lads tearing up a quiet neighborhood drunk as skunks, it's probably not going to be Americans. Most Americans don't go to places like Prague or Budapest for drinking and sex tourism but for many Europeans, it's fair to say that these places are best known for these activities.

Just relax. Americans do not stick out like sore thumbs. You might notice them if you're American yourself but they are not overrunning Europe as tourists. Eastern Europeans are all over. Loud Brits. South Americans and Chinese have masses of middle class world travelers. Brits and Scandinavians continue to travel a lot. In fact, assuming that everyone is noticing you and having something against you for being American is arrogant in itself. People really take very little notice.
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Old 01-15-2018, 05:50 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyJuly View Post
I travel a lot with English speaking tour groups. I have been to places and have had interactions where you get a definite vibe that Americans are not welcome or are undesirable tourists. Anyway, I have a few of experiences:
1. In Morocco, traveling with a 14 person tour group of women, men everywhere at mint tea houses sitting outside smoking and frowning at our group.
2. On a bus tour passing through Germany, stopping at rest stops and being treated rudely by cashiers as you try to purchase something without speaking German.
3. In Paris at the Moulin Rouge, rude waiters, and being herded like cattle in lines and packed into tiny tables; requests ignored.
4. From tour guides, making sneaky snide comments about Americans, e.g. In China, tour guide kept referring to Americans as "Big Nose"; On a tour through Europe, Tour Guide insinuating Americans are too demanding and are expected to be big tippers more than Australians.
5. Stopping on a cruise in Bahamas, where frowning vendors were rude and suck their teeth if you say not interested.

Have you visited places where you you felt unwelcome or singled out because you were American or simply just for being a tourist?
Having been in the hospitality industry in a touristy area, I can tell you that no one likes a 14-top. Tourists or not. Americans or not.
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