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Old 01-26-2018, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,066 posts, read 3,393,954 times
Reputation: 7710

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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Lol, I keep mine at 76-78 all the time.

How cold are your winters, how many months do you use heat, and what do your heating bills come to?
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,066 posts, read 3,393,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
And some people don't realize that different buildings have different insulation efficiencies and heating sources, even when located on the same street much less same region. Or that different people have different comfort levels, and that doesn't make one person "right" and the other person "wrong". Or that the temp coming out the vent has nothing to do with the average temp of the living space unless one spends all their time sitting by the vent.

And someone has to foot that heating bill. I'm all for raising the thermostat especially if it was set to 50. That seems like the worst thing the host did. But raising it to 76? Christ. Whatever happened to wearing a sweater in the house? Comfort levels don't discount heating bills, honey. The host should have known better, kept the house warmer for when OP got there, and specified what the max temp for the thermostat should be. But at the same time OP should know better than to raise it that high. Its AirBNB not a mountain cabin. As others have mentioned, raising the heat higher doesn't make it warm up faster.
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,066 posts, read 3,393,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mangomadness View Post
This may be true of newer buildings and homes built with energy efficiency in mind, but it is not the norm across the North, as you say, because many older, turn-of-the-century buildings still exist. I grew up in the Midwest and am very familiar. Unless remodeled at some point, many of those homes and buildings are not well-insulated. The very opposite. The brick holds cold when itís cold and heat when itís hot. When landlords started separating heat to GFA from the old radiator, boiler heat, it became a bad situation with high heat bills and still uncomfortable inside temps during the winter. Energy efficient windows helped, but only so much. Radiator heat really was the best heat for those buildings. Even the newer office buildings can have poor insulation. I worked in a typical concrete and glass office building built in the 80ís and it was a cold environment despite the heat. I started working from home more often because it was just too uncomfortable.
My house was built in the 1880s or so and its very well insulated. It stays warm enough in the winter and it can get very hot in the summer (we don't have central AC) With the thermostat at 73 the house is too hot, I can't imagine 76. Now, a studio apartment where I lived in Texas, that house had no insulation especially in the bathroom. Bathroom was always 20 degrees colder in the winter than outside and a sauna in the summer.
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:26 PM
 
12,666 posts, read 7,568,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelly237 View Post
I would not have been pleased at coming into a 50 degree room and it taking hours to be warm.
But turning the heat up by 30* would not warm the house any faster. And once the house is warm, there is no reason to keep the thermostat set at that temperature at all times, especially since the OP wasnít going to be at the house very often. Why have an empty house so hot?
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Mt. Lebanon
1,844 posts, read 1,945,801 times
Reputation: 1899
My bill for December when we had way below freezing !-1f -10f) was $350. And the thermostat was between 65f to 72f mostly over 70 because I had guests. 72is ok 76 is not. I should ask southerners how much their electricity bill runs in summer. I doubt it's $350.
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XRiteMA98 View Post
I tell my guests they can eat whatever is in the fridge and I literally don't mind if they eat it all. Usually they are snacks and beverages other people have left behind. Sodas, cookies, yogurts, nuts, crackers, soups, cereal, butter, lemons. I don;t care.

I don't live there, but nearby. I greet my guests.

My guests - I call them guests because this is what Airbnb calls them - enter with a key that's outside in the lockbox.

The house has high speed internet, big screen TV with lots of channels and lots of privacy. The house is very safe for women. I fell in love with this house when I saw it at an open house and was not looking to buy, per se. I was just curious. I am an artistic type and I always wanted to restore an old house and have someday something that's residence for writers. For this I need a business plan and until I come up with an idea a friend of mine told me to put it on Airbnb, to recoup my costs. The house had appealed to young people and old people alike. They all go "wow" after they come in!

It has rooms that have locks individually and I have either all female guests at a time, or families or all male guests, never mixed gender strangers under the same roof.

The whole house was entirely redone and decorated because it was in terrible shape. There isn't a place or a brick in that house that hasn't been touched. And yes, that includes new insulation. My bedrooms are warm. Bathroom and kitchen completely redone from scratch. It is modern and vibrant. Beats the impersonal hotel stay hands down! I also stayed with random people in my traveles. Airbnb shows you hosts - when look to rent something - based on common interests listed, so this is why I end up with people I have something in common with.

And before criticizing me that I don't like people putting the thermostat on 76F without asking: I changed the house rules on the listing: I only accept from 68-72. That's it. Take it or leave it.

And yes, if people are nice, polite I do more for them. I once had some elderly from England. I drove them around in my car a whole Sunday, I showed them the city. At the end of the day we were doing the dishes in the kicthen, exchanging life stories. I hosted an 80 year old who also had an incredible life story and that impressed me very much. I hosted college students over the summer who were in town for internship. Such a nice bunch! I actually cooked and brought food for them free of charge. If I have guests coming by plane: if I have time I give them a ride from and to the airport. Once I had a 23 year old Chinese girl who stayed one night with me and was leaving the next day to New York City by bus. Her bus was ad midnight. I went with her and stayed there until she got on the bus. I also got to wave to her mom in China, over skype on the phone assuring her the daughter was OK. What hotel clerk does that, tell me? So please don;t tell me I'm inflexible when it comes to my guests.

I hosted large families, bridal parties, a writer ( ), people who, after staying with at my house also decided to become hosts and I spent time with them sharing from my experience as a host and as a traveler. I talked to my guests and with most, I discover something in common, professional or hobby, or just likes and dislikes.

I could honestly say that my guests follow the Bell curve, with 90% of them being nice, 5% creating me some sort of problems and 5% being exceptional guests.

In OP's case it is the host's responsibility to have ensured the house was on 70F when she arrived. Also it is his responsibility (and interest) to make sure the house is insulated and prevents drafts of air.

But I stick with my opinion that putting the thermostat on 76F is disrespectful.

The fridge thing depends on the situation. If its not stocked too much (enough for one or two people) or if its a mini fridge then its fine. But I've stayed at an AirBNB where I was not the only guest. There was like what, 5 other rooms for guests? It was a big house. If I was renting a house like that out, with a big fridge, and I had it stocked with snacks and food, I would expect it to be for ALL my guests. It would be totally uncool for a single guest to eat all the food for themselves and barely leave anything for the other guests. It would also be uncool to make a mess or not put things back or not close things like milk or mayonnaise. My point is, being told "You can use this" doesn't mean "You can misuse this." For example, every AirBNB should of course have a shower, but that doesn't mean you can also leave the water running all day and leaving the water running all day is the same as leaving the heat on at a high temperature no less, all day.

OP should have known better and not have set it so high and at least turn it down when not at the place. The host should have known better and communicated the thermostat rules, however OP could have also texted the host "Hey, can I set it to this temp?" They both screwed up. I also recommend that the host invest in at least a space heater for the winter.
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,066 posts, read 3,393,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
I'm not wearing sweaters and jackets *inside* the house. Maybe that's how you northern folks roll but I'm used to shorts and t-shirt. I'm not camping.

If you rent your house out it's up to you to post any rules.

Why not? I mean I'm wearing a t shirt today but its only like in the 30s outside, I didn't even wear a sweater outside. But why would I not wear sweaters and jackets inside the house on a normal winter day? That would mean I have to take a jacket on and off constantly when going in and out. I'd rather keep my sweaters on all day. You ever shoveled snow before, hoss? It makes you sweat. When I'm done shoveling and I come inside the house, I would hate to come inside a house that would be extremely stuffy and hot. I like my house warm enough to be comfortable in the winter, but cool enough I can keep my sweaters on. Maybe take off the big jacket but taking on and putting on so many layers throughout the day, yea that's no fun.

Btw my dad doesn't live up north, never has, and his policy is to never use heat lol. He's a true cheapskate. "You're cold? Put on a damn sweater, pansy. I ain't turning the heat on!" Even I'm not that cheap!
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:01 PM
 
8,080 posts, read 13,472,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
.....especially since the OP wasnít going to be at the house very often. Why have an empty house so hot?
How do you know he wasn't at the house very often ??? If he wrote that I missed it.
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Old 01-26-2018, 11:49 PM
 
6,982 posts, read 3,877,231 times
Reputation: 14888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
The electric company isnít going to care about what the actual temperature is. If the OP doesnít run up his electric bill with a high temperature, then he shouldnít run up a strangerís bill.
Oh stop - nobody said what the renter does at home is any different from what they do in the rental. The thermostat in the living room may be set at 76 but the temperature in the bedroom with the door closed may be 60. If the property owner wants to limit use of the heat he should 1) Make sure he's looking at actual temperatures and not temperature settings and 2) Notify the customer in advance what the conditions will be.
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Old 01-27-2018, 08:04 AM
 
9,707 posts, read 4,569,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Why not? I mean I'm wearing a t shirt today but its only like in the 30s outside, I didn't even wear a sweater outside. But why would I not wear sweaters and jackets inside the house on a normal winter day? That would mean I have to take a jacket on and off constantly when going in and out. I'd rather keep my sweaters on all day. You ever shoveled snow before, hoss? It makes you sweat. When I'm done shoveling and I come inside the house, I would hate to come inside a house that would be extremely stuffy and hot. I like my house warm enough to be comfortable in the winter, but cool enough I can keep my sweaters on. Maybe take off the big jacket but taking on and putting on so many layers throughout the day, yea that's no fun.

Btw my dad doesn't live up north, never has, and his policy is to never use heat lol. He's a true cheapskate. "You're cold? Put on a damn sweater, pansy. I ain't turning the heat on!" Even I'm not that cheap!
That's your preference, good for you. I'm still not wearing sweaters in the house. I'm turning the heat up. My definition of "comfortable" differs from yours and that doesn't make yours right.

PS if you're constantly going in and out of the house, that's why you're heating bills are so high.
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