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Old 01-27-2018, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,859,230 times
Reputation: 10243

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We've (DH and self) stayed at about a dozen Air BnB's.
I've enjoyed some Air BnB's much more than others but always have had an interesting experience.

I agree the host is passive-aggressive. If host told guest to "turn up the thermostat" he should have added: "Please do not set higher than 66-70 and please turn down to "**" at night or when you're not home. This will help me with affordable utility bills".

For the host to be pissy and leave a bad review after the fact is counter-productive. I would notify Air BnB of the facts. They monitor their hosts carefully, I suspect.

To be helpful, we generally select Air BnB's with great reviews. And we look for moderate rates and not real cheap rates. Just like any lodging choice, you get what you pay for.

Me, I hate dicey, cheap motels or hotels in fringe neighborhoods. I choose neighborhoods for Air BnB's carefully. I like to walk around a lot.

We've met some delightful hosts who have been very helpful about nearby attractions and eateries and been warmly hospitable. Once we rented an upper flat for a week and never met the host who lived down below (she was out of town our first few days). -- that was a bit strange but was fine, too. We're not real needy. Host left us a great review -- said we were the best guests -- she never knew we were there...(and vice-versa...lol)

This is what we like most about Air BnB -- the personal touch.
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Old 01-27-2018, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,459 posts, read 5,922,719 times
Reputation: 16151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
Why would you not refute the bad review if it's going to stick with you for the duration of hour Airbnb account?

Just dropping it and doing nothing would point to guilt in my eyes, something I would notice if I was a renter.
My thoughts exactly. Unless the OP has sworn off Air BNB over one incident which would be a terrible mistake
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Old 01-27-2018, 10:54 AM
 
3,196 posts, read 1,813,344 times
Reputation: 8438
Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
That's your preference, good for you. I'm still not wearing sweaters in the house. I'm turning the heat up. My definition of "comfortable" differs from yours and that doesn't make yours right.

PS if you're constantly going in and out of the house, that's why you're heating bills are so high.
When you are paying 100% of the heating bill you can set it at 100 degrees and keep the windows open all winter for all anyone cares (except the greens, of course).
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Old 01-27-2018, 01:39 PM
 
5,682 posts, read 8,754,172 times
Reputation: 4911
The owner would be wise to invest in a thermostat that could be set from afar. Or at least have a neighbor come in and reset the thermostat to 65 the night or morning before the guest arrives. 50 degrees produces cold walls and it's uncomfortable.

I think the biggest problem is the guest forgot to set the thermostat back down and it was heating a vacant apt at 76 for 10 days. I expect the host lost money bigtime on this rental.

Quote:
As others have mentioned, raising the heat higher doesn't make it warm up faster
This is a huge gripe for me, that people don't get it. But with the wind blowing and cold walls the OP may have needed a 76 setting.

Oh and I'm 62, I can afford not to work, and can afford 90% of the hotel rooms for a few days. But guess what - I'm frugal, I usually travel alone, and I don't mind staying in people's homes. Actually I prefer it. Good to see I'm not the only one here with that sentiment. I was beginning to worry about you guys.
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Old 01-27-2018, 02:01 PM
 
Location: NC
2,149 posts, read 1,164,173 times
Reputation: 5260
I personally don't think it's the OP's issue. I think the homeowner should have either left a note indicating the maximum temp they allow, installed something like the Nest thermostat in order to be able to control the temperature while away or provided space heater(s). I am very frugal. I am very cold natured. I would never intentionally have run up someone's electric bill, but if the house is not staying warm, I will bump up the thermostat. If the homeowner doesn't want people doing that, he has the three options above or he can stop renting out on Air BNB.

I've rented many VRBO and have never had an issue with a house that wasn't adequately heated (never even had a place dictate what I could set the temp at) or cooled. Many of them request that you set the temp back down to 55-60 (or up to 80) when you check out, which makes total sense. That doesn't mean people should be wasteful, I've walked past the VRBO two doors down when it's in the low 70s outside and the renters have all the doors open and the heat pump is going constantly. That to me is so different from what the OP is describing happened at the place he/she stayed.
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Old 01-27-2018, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,159 posts, read 11,768,218 times
Reputation: 32142
I don't think the issue was that the host had a maximum temperature that was allowed, it was that he arrived home to an empty house because the OP was out, and the temperature was at 76 degrees, heating an empty house.

Personally, I would not have thought I needed to tell a guest to turn the heat down in an empty house, that seems like basic common sense and courtesy to me. But as the saying goes, common sense is apparently not that common.
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Old 01-27-2018, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Georgia
4,562 posts, read 4,091,757 times
Reputation: 15768
I wouldn't worry about it. I'd be a bit suspicious of any host who went on for paragraphs about a thermostat in Cleveland in 20 degree weather. If it was important to the host, they should have left clear instructions. In the absence of instructions to the contrary, I think I'd be turning up the thermostat, too. It's usual for me to turn the thermostat down to 50 when I'm traveling for a few days, and I would have just assumed that that's what he did, too.

Passive-aggressive b.s., to me -- why didn't he just address it while you're there instead of clamming up and giving you the silent treatment? Childish . . . I think if I were you, I would add to my review, not angrily, but just to point out that the house was very cold, and that the shower was "tricky". What good is a review unless it's honest?
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Old 01-27-2018, 04:11 PM
 
708 posts, read 776,590 times
Reputation: 1753
This is ridiculous. Part of the hospitality business is making sure your guests are comfortable while also making sure guests understand the terms and conditions for their stay. I’m setting temps to where I’m comfortable unless otherwise restricted. OP was not restricted. If 80 was necessary, I would have done it. I’m paying for a comfortable stay and there were no restrictions on it. I wouldn’t have even sent an email, like OP was so nice to do.

I understand that Airbnb is a great source of extra income, but if a person is going to get bent out of shape over heat temps and can’t have a conversation about it, like an adult, then they should leave the Airbnb business to those who can.

All people are not created equal. Some people will be fine with 50-60 degree temps. Others will not. Some people will open the fridge and drink all the beer or eat up all the food, others won’t. I know a person who specifically rents Airbnb properties so his group can have private parties in them. They are not small get-togethers either - there’s music, dancing, and drinking. People are coming to your personal residence with a vacation mindset - ‘you as the owner will take care of things while I’m enjoying myself and if there is anything important I need to know, then you will tell me’. That’s why owners are supposed to have very clear house rules. To protect their home.

And all of the above is why Airbnb is not a business consideration for me. I’m definitely not welcoming random strangers into my home. My barrier can be summed up as personal space issues. I wouldn’t have a problem with a vacation/rental property being used, but my home is my sanctuary. I’d have all types of weird and restrictive rules making it just not worth it to stay in my place.

At the same time, I don’t want to feel like I’m vacationing at “grandma’s house” with a whole bunch of rules and expectations, so it is a hard pass on staying in Airbnb’s that are private homes/rooms. I’m not a loud or wild person and I go to bed at reasonable times most days, but I don’t want restrictions on my personal freedoms when vacationing. I’m just to used to the way hotels operate.
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Old 01-27-2018, 07:23 PM
 
8,080 posts, read 13,457,239 times
Reputation: 10322
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
I think the biggest problem is the guest forgot to set the thermostat back down and it was heating a vacant apt at 76 for 10 days. I expect the host lost money bigtime on this rental.
That isn't what happened..Reread the original post...
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Old 01-27-2018, 07:26 PM
 
8,080 posts, read 13,457,239 times
Reputation: 10322
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
I don't think the issue was that the host had a maximum temperature that was allowed, it was that he arrived home to an empty house because the OP was out, and the temperature was at 76 degrees, heating an empty house.

Personally, I would not have thought I needed to tell a guest to turn the heat down in an empty house, that seems like basic common sense and courtesy to me. But as the saying goes, common sense is apparently not that common.
If you are going to be out a few hours the benefit of adjusting the thermostat is questionable.
The OP did say the house never really truly got "warm" Why would he bump it down if it never got warm enough .
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