U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-25-2018, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Mt. Lebanon
1,844 posts, read 1,944,261 times
Reputation: 1899

Advertisements

well, I am an airbnb host myself. I never specified the thermostat limits but I did buy an intelligent one that I can control the settings from my phone from all over the globe if I travel.

Guess what? I had a guest who, although found the house warmed up at 70, goes in and puts in on 76! I immediately set it back on 70 and sent the guy a note about it! I was furious!!! It shows disrespect!
I'm not going to give him a bad review though, but I was as mad as I suppose your host in Cleveland was.

My personal opinion is that by doing something that one doesn't do at home - because it is very expensive - you take advantage of the host. It is disrespectful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-25-2018, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,522 posts, read 8,765,146 times
Reputation: 12215
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpl1228 View Post
skewered in his review of me. It all dwelled on the temperature of the thermostat, how I was not staying in a personal hotel, how it's someone's house and I need to be more respectful of temperature norms, etc. It went on and on that way, three paragraphs and all about the thermostat. (I think he's STILL writing about it as we speak.). And a backhanded compliment about how I "was probably just new to airbnb and how I will learn." Again, the condo was freezing. Old windows, drafty, etc. And is 76 degrees ridiculous and worth all of this?
I'd let go of it. Many (Most?) AirB&B property owners will see this guy as a difficult person and discount the review. I would.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 02:25 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
39,609 posts, read 2,991,249 times
Reputation: 12932
It is not disrespectful to set the heat at 76, if nothing was in the rules about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 02:29 PM
 
Location: On the road
5,951 posts, read 2,895,036 times
Reputation: 11392
Quote:
Originally Posted by XRiteMA98 View Post
Guess what? I had a guest who, although found the house warmed up at 70, goes in and puts in on 76! I immediately set it back on 70 and sent the guy a note about it! I was furious!!! It shows disrespect!
I'm not going to give him a bad review though, but I was as mad as I suppose your host in Cleveland was.

My personal opinion is that by doing something that one doesn't do at home - because it is very expensive - you take advantage of the host. It is disrespectful.
This seems weird to me, everyone has a different place that they are comfortable how can you possibly know this guest felt warm at 70 or that they didn't do that at home normally?

My parents like it at 68, my wife likes it at 76. Everyone is different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
3,182 posts, read 1,961,125 times
Reputation: 3321
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
This seems weird to me, everyone has a different place that they are comfortable how can you possibly know this guest felt warm at 70 or that they didn't do that at home normally?

My parents like it at 68, my wife likes it at 76. Everyone is different.
+1

Yup.

Also, air temperature is not the single and final answer in determining how warm a room feels. I started writing an explanation, but decided against it. Someone who has taken a thermodynamics course would probably understand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Mt. Lebanon
1,844 posts, read 1,944,261 times
Reputation: 1899
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
This seems weird to me, everyone has a different place that they are comfortable how can you possibly know this guest felt warm at 70 or that they didn't do that at home normally?

My parents like it at 68, my wife likes it at 76. Everyone is different.
well, in the office we have the thermostat set up at 70 be it summer or winter. I never heard people complaining that it is too hot or too cold. 70 should be OK. Most people keep the thermostat at 70 in winter or much lower, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Mt. Lebanon
1,844 posts, read 1,944,261 times
Reputation: 1899
Quote:
Originally Posted by hikernut View Post
+1

Yup.

Also, air temperature is not the single and final answer in determining how warm a room feels. I started writing an explanation, but decided against it. Someone who has taken a thermodynamics course would probably understand.
Exactly! The house feels warm even when the thermostat is on 68! I actually found the ceiling fan on several times after guests left because it was so hot and they didn't figure out how to turn the "intelligent" thermostat down. Others texted me to turn the heat down when it was only 70 because the room was too hot. SO at 76 this place should have felt like a sauna!

I edit to encourage the poster who said he never tried airbnb to do so. I never had bad experiences either as an host nor as a traveler. Things might happen however. Choose an experienced host who has good reviews.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 03:36 PM
 
4,127 posts, read 3,785,985 times
Reputation: 11333
Quote:
Originally Posted by XRiteMA98 View Post
well, I am an airbnb host myself. I never specified the thermostat limits but I did buy an intelligent one that I can control the settings from my phone from all over the globe if I travel.

Guess what? I had a guest who, although found the house warmed up at 70, goes in and puts in on 76! I immediately set it back on 70 and sent the guy a note about it! I was furious!!! It shows disrespect!
I'm not going to give him a bad review though, but I was as mad as I suppose your host in Cleveland was.

My personal opinion is that by doing something that one doesn't do at home - because it is very expensive - you take advantage of the host. It is disrespectful.
I wish you HAD written a review of the guest stating what they did. I would not rent to someone who did that. My rental is mostly only in the summertime, but I don't put in the air conditioners until a heat wave, and I ask that people be reasonable, not leave windows or doors open while running a/c, and turn them off when they are out. If I know that they're ignoring this, I'd definitely give them a bad review.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Mt. Lebanon
1,844 posts, read 1,944,261 times
Reputation: 1899
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
I wish you HAD written a review of the guest stating what they did. I would not rent to someone who did that. My rental is mostly only in the summertime, but I don't put in the air conditioners until a heat wave, and I ask that people be reasonable, not leave windows or doors open while running a/c, and turn them off when they are out. If I know that they're ignoring this, I'd definitely give them a bad review.
I know I am off-topic and I apologize to the readers: I advise you, parentologist, to get a Nest thermostat. You can control both the heater and the AC unit with this. I got it after one guest from California left the house in December when outside it was way below freezing and they TURNED OFF the thermostat.

Luckily I got there in a few hours after they left and inside it was 50F. The water pipes were OK. I scolded him and he said he didn't know! They don't have this issue in California! Can you believe that?

I was tired of people leaving the lights on when they left and the incident that could have burst my pipes, so I bought the the "intelligent" thermostat and "intelligent" light bulbs that I can control with my phone. People complained here about bad Airbnb experience as guests. It goes both ways, you know? I bust my but to clean everything, scrub the bathroom and yet, once in a blue moon, I get a bad review from someone who complains about not being able to open the lock box (although they have the code!) or the mattress. Oh, don;t get me started on the mattresses! The Airbnb people should incorporate mattress preferences in their algorithm that pairs up host and guests!

Some people prefer soft, some not and I actually have to ask people which way they prefer so that I can put a soft mattress topper or not in order to avoid bad reviews after I've been burned a few times.

However, I prefer to stay in airbnbs. Cheap hotels are dirty, internet is flaky or non-existent, carpet is old and smelly... why would anyone want to stay in such a thing when for the same price or way less, you can stay in someone's home? Except for a few "incidents" I had only nice guests it was a pleasure to host. Some I even fed, that's how much we clicked, some brought small gifts.

It is all a matter of respect you know? I wouldn't change the thermostat not even in my parents home without asking. My guidelines before the incident were "be respectful of the house as if it was your parents'". Now, I added the thermostat rule. No matter what, some people feel entitled.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2018, 04:09 PM
 
1,528 posts, read 907,199 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by evening sun View Post
It is not disrespectful to set the heat at 76, if nothing was in the rules about it.
Well it is if you're not even in the home. I think if you're a guest in someone else's home, including Airbnb, you should take some efforts to avoid perceptions that you are not respecting their home. Cranking the heat up like that and leaving when the owner will be coming home is a good way to create a bad feeling. If people just take a little extra care then a lot of bad feelings and distrust can be avoided. Same for the owner...they should take care not to create any perceptions that they are not respecting privacy, etc.

The Airbnb model requires trust for it to work. Hotels for the most part do not trade on trust. Airbnb guests give money to a stranger for a home just based on photos and reviews. Hosts open their home up completely to a stranger. For it to work and for there to be enough trust, perceptions are very important.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top