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Old 03-22-2018, 09:04 PM
 
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In the northeast coastal states, row-houses (attached houses, of brick or stone) are common in small towns as well as in cities. Especially in old, industrial factory towns. Continuous miles (kilometers) of streets of homes with only sidewalks, and no grass or plants at all. For example, the view of the city Baltimore at the very beginning of the film "Hairspray" (you may be able to view this on "Youtube.com")........By contrast, in other regions of the USA, houses are separated and detached, in big cities as well as in small towns. The "northeast corridor" (Boston, Providence, New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington DC) has good train transportation, but the rest of the USA has very poor train service,

Houses are built mostly of wood, in coastal areas, but houses are made of stone in mountain areas.

In Los Angeles, you will see mountains in the distance, and there are canyons. In Eastern coastal regions, there are no mountains. In most of Florida, in southern California, and Arizona, palm trees are common. All of Florida has dry, sandy soil, and terrain is flat.

Culture is extremely different, in different regions of the USA. The east coast region (Atlantic), and the west coast region (Pacific), have Democratic and liberal politics and are called "blue states". The central and southern states, as well as Rocky Mountain states, have mostly Republican political views and are called "red states". Most people in central, southern, and Rocky Mountain states own guns, and oppose gun control. They also oppose abortion, public transportation, and labor unions. There are few women in political jobs. Exceptions are university communities which can be liberal. African-American populations in southern states also vote Democratic, but there are not enough of them to out-weigh the Republicans. Fundamentalist Protestant Christianity is common in the "Bible Belt" region, and affects politics greatly. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible_Belt Most rural areas of this region have very few, almost no Roman Catholics .

In states such as Oregon, New Hampshire and Vermont, people are much less religious, and more agnostic. The city of Portland, Oregon has the greatest environmental consciousness, for instance much bicycling for transportation, and recycling of materials.

Last edited by slowlane3; 03-22-2018 at 09:16 PM..
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Old 04-07-2018, 02:37 AM
 
662 posts, read 941,114 times
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Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
In the northeast coastal states, row-houses (attached houses, of brick or stone) are common in small towns as well as in cities. Especially in old, industrial factory towns. Continuous miles (kilometers) of streets of homes with only sidewalks, and no grass or plants at all. For example, the view of the city Baltimore at the very beginning of the film "Hairspray" (you may be able to view this on "Youtube.com")........By contrast, in other regions of the USA, houses are separated and detached, in big cities as well as in small towns. The "northeast corridor" (Boston, Providence, New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington DC) has good train transportation, but the rest of the USA has very poor train service,

Houses are built mostly of wood, in coastal areas, but houses are made of stone in mountain areas.

In Los Angeles, you will see mountains in the distance, and there are canyons. In Eastern coastal regions, there are no mountains. In most of Florida, in southern California, and Arizona, palm trees are common. All of Florida has dry, sandy soil, and terrain is flat.

Culture is extremely different, in different regions of the USA. The east coast region (Atlantic), and the west coast region (Pacific), have Democratic and liberal politics and are called "blue states". The central and southern states, as well as Rocky Mountain states, have mostly Republican political views and are called "red states". Most people in central, southern, and Rocky Mountain states own guns, and oppose gun control. They also oppose abortion, public transportation, and labor unions. There are few women in political jobs. Exceptions are university communities which can be liberal. African-American populations in southern states also vote Democratic, but there are not enough of them to out-weigh the Republicans. Fundamentalist Protestant Christianity is common in the "Bible Belt" region, and affects politics greatly. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible_Belt Most rural areas of this region have very few, almost no Roman Catholics .

In states such as Oregon, New Hampshire and Vermont, people are much less religious, and more agnostic. The city of Portland, Oregon has the greatest environmental consciousness, for instance much bicycling for transportation, and recycling of materials.
I agree with your first (largely architectural and lawn based) and last paragraphs. The rest, not so much.

As for second paragraph about housing, the greatest number of houses in the US are built of wood. There are, of course, stone or, more commonly, brick houses. The local resources tend to have a heavy influence, Hence, houses in the mountainous areas, where there a lot of trees, are more often wood than other. The early settlers used the resources that were readily available. Hence many brick homes in the non-mountainous areas of the mid-west where there were few trees, but bricks could be easily made or stones taken from quarries.

Culture on the coasts is certainly different than in the mid-west, and the regions just east and west before reaching the coasts. I think the difference is best described as big city versus midsize and smaller cities or towns and the vast rural geography of the central part of he US. There are,however, some large cities in between the coasts. The red/blue (Republican/Democrat) breakdown is an accurate generalization. However your reference to abortion, public transportation and labor unions is misleading, at best. There may be an opposition to abortion but, as you suggest, that is more likely to be found in the Bible Belt. Public transportation is purely a function of urban size, not the attitude of the people. Similarly, unions are not common in the central regions because there is so much agricultural activity there, which is not conducive or designed for such industry. Unions re a good thing (in my Montana opinion), but they are more suited for the types of industry found in or near the large cities closer to the coast. There are unions in many cities between the coast. They are smaller but, again, that is a function of more geographically spread out places for business.
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