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Old 03-22-2018, 01:41 PM
 
17,254 posts, read 10,183,539 times
Reputation: 28775

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The host here dodged a bullet. Airbnb says such cancellations are rare, and I don't think most guests are as annoying as this guy.

I also don't think it was a coincidence the guy wanted to rent for 31 days as one of the comment mentions. Anything over 30 days and one becomes a tenant.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/airbn...163951961.html

Quote:

Last month, Logan Kugler checked into the home of a Los Angeles-based Airbnb host. The plan was to stay there for about one month, but Kugler found himself checking out just three days after checking in. Thatís not because he wanted to, but because the host cancelled his reservation.

This story is not about any one party being right or wrong. Instead, let this serve as a reminder that we are living in an age of non-traditional services -- be that via ride-share, home-sharing, bike-sharing and so forth. That means, as it stands now, anyone has the right to kick you out of their car, house or apartment if they feel so inclined. That's essentially what happened with Kugler when he used Airbnb to rent a home in LA last month.
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Old 03-22-2018, 02:49 PM
 
Location: On the road
5,924 posts, read 2,887,264 times
Reputation: 11331
“As it stands right now, if you book an Airbnb you could be homeless at any second and thrown out on the street,” he said. “If this remains, I think they may lose some customers as awareness grows about this.”


Jesus Christ what a drama queen, a hotel can do the exact same thing if they decide they don't want a guest on their premises, except they wouldn't get 36 hours to find another place like this guy did. Airbnb tried to cover in the same way that hotels (hopefully) would by reimbursing him for his stay and assisting him in finding a new place.
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Old 03-23-2018, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Middle of the Pacific Ocean
11,673 posts, read 6,277,227 times
Reputation: 11510
^^I'm not so sure about that. While innkeepers have some leeway to remove paying guests from the premises, everything I've been reading (admittedly basic research) shows that they'd need more serious grounds to remove such a guest. I'm also finding that some states may even require a formal eviction in some instances. In any event, I appreciate the article. I get that many love Airbnb, but it is a service that I will not be using.
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Old 03-23-2018, 09:33 AM
 
9,784 posts, read 5,000,424 times
Reputation: 33752
It seems (from reading between the lines) that the real problem was the guest. Sounds like there's a lot more to this story!
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Old 03-23-2018, 02:50 PM
 
2,546 posts, read 1,635,825 times
Reputation: 2034
The guest is crazy . AirBnb offered to put him with another rental and he refused. He admitted he had a "particular/? peculiar requirement"
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Old 03-24-2018, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,459 posts, read 5,922,719 times
Reputation: 16151
As soon as I started reading this thread I knew it was the guest. Who asks for the owner to change out lights or move the fridge on a temporary rental? I'm sure that was just the tip of the iceberg, I'd throw him out on his butt too.
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Old 03-24-2018, 04:24 AM
 
71,508 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49088
there have been opposite cases where you get freeloaders who take a very short term airbnb rental and then do not leave .they know it can take a while to get them out .
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Old 03-24-2018, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,537 posts, read 9,937,499 times
Reputation: 9051
"she felt uncomfortable with the amount of requests he was making, such as to change the layout of the refrigerator and install different lights"

She made the right move. Later, pal.
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Old 03-24-2018, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,312 posts, read 6,965,178 times
Reputation: 3502
I saw this story a couple days ago and actually felt compelled to comment on the article, which is rare. I really feel like this story offers a lot of comfort, knowing that airbnb the company has your back and will go to great lengths (refund you fully, cover your hotel room, find you alternate accommodations for the same price or less) and the guest sounds totally ridiculous. He essentially says airbnb is unreliable, but that he doesn't want to stay in hotels either. So, good luck to you, fella!!
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:30 PM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,279 posts, read 3,124,638 times
Reputation: 4062
Post and that whole fine line between "hotel room" and "tenancy" is an interesting issue

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
The host here dodged a bullet. Airbnb says such cancellations are rare, and I don't think most guests are as annoying as this guy. I also don't think it was a coincidence the guy wanted to rent for 31 days as one of the comment mentions. Anything over 30 days and one becomes a tenant.
31 days is often a magic number for tenancy, and that whole fine line between "hotel room" and "tenancy" is an interesting one. Some towns forbid renting out an apartment for fewer than 31 days, and many places will refuse to rent a room for more than 30 days to the same person to avoid this issue entirely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
^^I'm not so sure about that. While innkeepers have some leeway to remove paying guests from the premises, everything I've been reading (admittedly basic research) shows that they'd need more serious grounds to remove such a guest. I'm also finding that some states may even require a formal eviction in some instances. In any event, I appreciate the article. I get that many love Airbnb, but it is a service that I will not be using.
Correct -- no formal "eviction" to kick a short-term guest out of a hotel room, but stay +30 days, and the rules change and it could take literally months to get somebody who has "established permanent residency" out.
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