U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-16-2019, 03:35 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,915 posts, read 4,074,508 times
Reputation: 15540

Advertisements

I love seeing Broadway shows, walking through Central Park, walking down the High Line, and just walking all over Manhattan. I'll be visiting again in June. Every time I visit, I seem to walk about 17-20 miles a day. Probably because I walk from midtown, where I usually stay, down to Wall Street, then back to Central Park, around Central Park, up the East and/or West Side, and back to Midtown for an evening show.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-16-2019, 06:44 PM
 
443 posts, read 165,754 times
Reputation: 505
Been a few times, another trip to NYC next month

There's *No* other place like it in the US. Brash, noisy, crowded, fast. Dirty too. Manhattan is too much of a concrete jungle. I do like the diversity in Queens, Brooklyn. Avoided Bronx. Never been to the suburbs (Long Island, etc).

I prefer London over NYC if I were to compare the 2- more charming and yet so vibrant and less of a concrete jungle, and for certain reasons, even Chicago. But no doubt NYC is one of a kind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 04:41 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,453 posts, read 1,693,092 times
Reputation: 8133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I'm sure it's different from the 90s but I don't see how anyone could describe it as "homogenized".
I imagine it means that everybody is in politically enforced lock-step with regard to diversity. That's the way NYC-based talk shows appear to people out in fly-over country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,348 posts, read 7,434,076 times
Reputation: 6785
I visited with DH for the first time last May. We were only there for four days and only visited Manhattan, unfortunately because I would love to see Brooklyn and Queens someday, but here are some of my observations:

Walking up Fifth Avenue was over the top; seeing all of the famous designer stores, especially Tiffany and the original Saks Fifth Ave., going inside St. Patrick's Cathedral and Trump Tower, seeing the Plaza Hotel...just so surreal for someone who has spent her entire life in the middle of the country.

Central Park was lovely and felt extremely safe, although we were cautioned by several locals not to venture there at night under any circumstances, which we wouldn't have anyway. It kind of surprised me how vast it was, I mean, I have read the square acreage many times over the years and knew it was large, but when you think of a city park you just can't think on that scale in most any other city so it is still overwhelming. I was also surprised at how natural and not manicured much of it was, although not put off by this, it was actually rather refreshing to see a bit of "natural nature" in the heart of Manhattan.

We met several locals, including a tour guide who was a born and bred in Manhattan native, who were very supportive of our President, some even told us detailed stories of what he has done for NYC over the years, and in glowing terms. This shocked me because the MSM would have you believe that every single person in NYC is an inherent liberal Democrat who hates this President with a passion but that definitely was not our experience. I'm sure they are in the minority based on election results, but still, there are people in Manhattan who like this President.

It felt so, so safe walking around Manhattan, more so than cities like Atlanta, Nashville, and definitely anywhere in SoCal. Granted, we stayed at the Roosevelt Hotel which is located in a prime location in Midtown East, so we were probably in one of the safest, wealthier areas of the city, but it was just amazing how safe it felt and how "not rude" the people really were out and about on the streets. That's another thing you get growing up in the heartland, the myth over and over and over that everyone in NYC is obnoxiously rude. Don't believe it. While people on the street generally keep to themselves, they are not the aggressive, grimacing, shoving people that they are purported to be, just normal Americans going about their business.

I was surprised at the amount of scaffolding and canopies over the sidewalks around Manhattan but they weren't off putting, it was obvious that they were there to protect pedestrians from construction high above and you can't fault a city for having safe builidings. They did screw up a few photos but safety trumps unobstructed views any day.

Food prices were higher than just about anywhere else we've been but I expected that and they weren't as exorbitant as people are led to believe. We went to a small pizza place around the corner from our hotel, I think it was called Uncle Paul's, and we both ate for under $20, which I thought was very reasonable for Midtown Manhattan. Other places though, featured a typical cheeseburger a fries for around $18-20 which I thought was a bit much, those are Maui prices, but it is NYC, after all.

I won't go on, there is much more but this post is getting too long. Did we like it overall? LOVED it. Will we go back? Hopefully many times, each time seeing something new that we missed the previous time, I'm sure.

Last edited by canudigit; 02-17-2019 at 06:39 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 08:54 AM
 
Location: NoVa
2,129 posts, read 2,914,011 times
Reputation: 2929
I have mix feelings about NYC. On the one hand, it’s the only place in the US that I would call a big city with all the convenience of a true big city: the subways, the buses, the shops, the restaurants, attractions - all within striking distance. But I also noticed how old and outdated a lot of the infrastructure in NYC is compared to other cosmopolitan cities such as London or Tokyo. The only subway station with a modern feel in NYC is the one where the WTC used to be.

NYC is also significantly dirtier compared to Boston. I much prefer Boston, cleaner, prettier, more compact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 10:30 AM
 
10,252 posts, read 12,281,050 times
Reputation: 14144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
Honestly, most New Yorkers would be more than happy to assist her. Some guy working, making 8 dollars an hour unloading a truck is probably more likely to be grumpy than the average resident
Come on, in NYC the truck driver unloading the truck probably makes $28 an hour! Union, "local 4" buddy!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 10:34 AM
 
10,252 posts, read 12,281,050 times
Reputation: 14144
I stayed in NYC a couple years back over the Christmas/New Years week. It was fine, hit all the landmarks:

1. Trade Center/Memorial
2. Ice Skated in Rockefeller ("rink" was tiny and it was expensive, tree that looks so nice on TV looked raggedy in person)
3. Everything was overpriced, but the service was very very good. Nobu was cool but the prices were double what they should have been. Relied on TripAdvisor for restaurant recommendations for local places, every one we tried was great!

Would I race back? No, but hey its NYC! Walking around Times Square at 1am, seemed ok never once felt unsafe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,152 posts, read 45,694,157 times
Reputation: 61872
It was 10 years ago, but it was my first and only time there. All I knew was from the impressions I had from TV.
I stayed at the Trump hotel at Grand central station, so it was very convenient to walk places.
I expected everyone to look chic, like on Sex and the City, but most people were dressed for comfort. We walked all over and only took one cab. On TV, it seems like everyone takes cabs everywhere.
We had a nice time, and enjoyed it, but it was so expensive that we could take a week long cruise for what a long weekend in NYC costs, so we haven’t gone back.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,204 posts, read 54,662,203 times
Reputation: 66692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I'm sure it's different from the 90s but I don't see how anyone could describe it as "homogenized".
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
I imagine it means that everybody is in politically enforced lock-step with regard to diversity. That's the way NYC-based talk shows appear to people out in fly-over country.
I took it to mean the way some of what made NYC unique has been replaced with things like chain departments stores and chain restaurants.

New York City still has unique restaurants and shops, but in some of the touristy areas like Times Square, you now see places like Ruby Tuesday and Olive Garden, which never used to be the case. It makes some of us scratch our heads that people travel to New York with all its wonderful cuisine and eat at the same place you can find in any generic strip mall in Middle America.

But, lol, no dear, you should not base your views about NYC on talk shows any more than we should base our views of fly-over country on what WE see in the media. I once was under the impression that most of the rest of the country lived in trailers because every time there was an earthquake or a tornado or a flood in the middle of the country, all we saw on the news were ruined trailer parks.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: http://www.city-data.com/terms.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,010 posts, read 8,433,569 times
Reputation: 15621
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnaGWS View Post
I prefer the NYC from 15-20 years ago, but I still love visiting. It seems very homogenized now, in a way that I cannot really explain.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I'm sure it's different from the 90s but I don't see how anyone could describe it as "homogenized".
A common complaint that marks a person as a ‘real’ New Yorker. I remember people telling me this when I moved there 15-20 years ago, that the real NY was gone, replaced with a Disney-fied version of itself. I did not believe it then, but 5 years later I was mourning the lost NY, and today I look back fondly at landmarks that are now gone.

It is inevitable in a city that is constantly churning and re-inventing itself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top