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Old 04-05-2019, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,401 posts, read 21,239,668 times
Reputation: 24226

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
This is probably a good point to ask some questions. If you are traveling for reasons other than business...

1. Flying from the U.S. to Europe, what is the minimum amount of time there that would make the trip worthwhile?

2. Flying from the U.S. to Asia, what is the minimum amount of time there that would make the trip worthwhile?

3. Flying from the U.S. to Africa, what is the minimum amount of time there that would make the trip worthwhile?

4. Flying from the U.S. to Australia, what is the minimum amount of time there that would make the trip worthwhile?
If I only had one week's vacation a year, forever thinking how life is too short, not knowing I'll even be alive for my retirement years, even 3 for 4 days in Asia, Africa, Europe would be well worth it! It's totally amazing how much ground you can cover in a foreign city in just one day!

When I bought my Round-The-World Pass in 1991, I looked upon it as a "wine-tasting" trip of 33 days. Zip into Mumbai for 2 days, zip into Delhi/Agra for a couple days, One day in Calcutta, 2 days in Bangkok, a couple days in Tokyo and Seoul. By doing this, later on, I was in a better position to decide where I planned to "drink more wine". And if you don't think I was totally worn out after that trip!!! But well, well worth it!

Just think the ground you could cover if you only had 2 days in Paris or London!!!

And if you have a few weeks, a Round-The-World-Pass is the best bargain out there! Why spend all that money to go to one country, and then return? Keep on trucking! All the way around! Kill lots of birds with one stone!
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Old 04-06-2019, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Australia
904 posts, read 331,072 times
Reputation: 1657
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian_Lee View Post
Quite hesitant about Sabah. Especially if one stays in some of the resorts on the outlying islands.

In recent years, there were some cases of kidnapping of tourists from these resorts by the Islamic terrorist groups in Northern Philippines facing Sabah. The victims were released only after hefty ransom was paid. One victim was killed after the family could not pay the ransom on time.
We stayed in Sandakan and did a two night tour up the river to an Eco lodge. David Attenborough and his entourage called in one night for dinner. Then flew to Kota Kinabalu and stayed at the five star Shangrila Resort quite cheaply and then in a hotel in the city while we went to Mt Kinabalu and so on.

Felt safer than we have been in many other places.
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Old 04-06-2019, 01:34 AM
 
Location: On the road
5,941 posts, read 2,893,129 times
Reputation: 11381
Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
If you go see a movie in another country, many of them have intermissions where people take a 15 min break to go bio, drink, or smoke cigs. Americans are probably sitting there frustrated and waiting.
We often go see movies in other countries, have probably been to the cinema in at least 40 countries and not once have we encountered these intermissions you're talking about. Can you give an example of the "many" countries where this happens?


Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
In general a lot of Americans don't like to travel abroad because they are not accustomed to the culture and foods. So it is a huge inconvenience.
Your post was full of questionable assumptions stated as fact, but here I think you're conflating liking and having the means. As many others have pointed out USA is a lot more diverse so more options for domestic travel, Americans get less vacation time, and many destinations are much farther for them.
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Old 04-06-2019, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Austin
29,546 posts, read 16,487,525 times
Reputation: 8087
Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
I recently returned from a 6 week adventure travel trip to Laos and Cambodia. I traveled by bus, boat and motorcycle. It was the experience of a lifetime. I was very struck by how few Americans I encountered - practically none! The tourists/travelers were overwhelmingly Euros, Aussies, Kiwis and Canadians. These were not wealthy people, just regular working folks with the curiosity and will to see the world, eat new food and push outside their comfort zone. Americans, it seems, are interested mostly in inclusive resorts and Disneyland.



Why is this? Please don't respond that you've personally been where ever. That may well be. But I'm speaking of the extreme scarcity of Americans getting out and seeing something different and exotic. It's undeniable. What's wrong with us? Fear? Lack of education? Lack of curiosity? Spending money on fancy cars, houses, whatever, and that's it?
80 million Americans traveled abroad in 2016. Nothing wrong with us.

There is nothing wrong with people who choose not to travel abroad so get off your high horse.
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Old 04-06-2019, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Austin
29,546 posts, read 16,487,525 times
Reputation: 8087
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
If I only had one week's vacation a year, forever thinking how life is too short, not knowing I'll even be alive for my retirement years, even 3 for 4 days in Asia, Africa, Europe would be well worth it! It's totally amazing how much ground you can cover in a foreign city in just one day!

When I bought my Round-The-World Pass in 1991, I looked upon it as a "wine-tasting" trip of 33 days. Zip into Mumbai for 2 days, zip into Delhi/Agra for a couple days, One day in Calcutta, 2 days in Bangkok, a couple days in Tokyo and Seoul. By doing this, later on, I was in a better position to decide where I planned to "drink more wine". And if you don't think I was totally worn out after that trip!!! But well, well worth it!

Just think the ground you could cover if you only had 2 days in Paris or London!!!

And if you have a few weeks, a Round-The-World-Pass is the best bargain out there! Why spend all that money to go to one country, and then return? Keep on trucking! All the way around! Kill lots of birds with one stone!
I like your style. We frequently stay only a day or two in a big city. And we would love to do an RTW trip. It's in our long-range plans.
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Old 04-06-2019, 11:55 AM
 
7,922 posts, read 5,039,870 times
Reputation: 13577
In any large and at least somewhat variegated country, and especially one with a prideful and vehemently nationalistic narrative, there is a prevailing view, that taking a deep personal interest in things abroad, is not a good value-proposition. That is, there are less costly and more efficient things to do back home. The idea, however narrow-minded, is at least more compelling here in the US, than it would be say in Japan or Switzerland, the former being a famously systematized and self-contained society, and the latter being a small country surrounded by larger ones.

That said, with travel, as with education, or interest in the arts, or really any technical or humanistic or cultural thing, America suffers from disparity between the achievement that it actually has made, and the cultural narrative with which it's saddled. For instance, an overwhelming amount of Nobel prizes and Fields Medals and patents belong to Americans, and yet we don't think of America as being a society of scientists or engineers. Some of the best symphony orchestras are American, and some of the best conductors and pianists and violinists are American citizens, and yet we don't think of America as a country of classical-music. Some of the tastiest beers are brewed in America, and yet with think of America as a country of Bud Lite.

In other words, the dominant narrative of America is pop-culture, common-denominator, Heartland blue-collar. The excellence that America offers is somehow blushingly hidden, and the mediocrity, boorishness and poor taste are proudly paraded. Returning to our theme, I am not persuaded that Americans as a people are somehow more insular, more dismissive of the world outside, more reluctant to travel, less intellectually curious, less interested in history or architecture or archaeology or anthropology, than are other peoples, or other nations. But the prevailing narrative says so. And the American voices that are more boorish, more insular, more populist, less curious and less sophisticated, are move voluble and more influential than are their opposites. America somehow relishes making itself look stupid.
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Old 04-06-2019, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,634 posts, read 8,531,441 times
Reputation: 5180
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
In any large and at least somewhat variegated country, and especially one with a prideful and vehemently nationalistic narrative, there is a prevailing view, that taking a deep personal interest in things abroad, is not a good value-proposition. That is, there are less costly and more efficient things to do back home. The idea, however narrow-minded, is at least more compelling here in the US, than it would be say in Japan or Switzerland, the former being a famously systematized and self-contained society, and the latter being a small country surrounded by larger ones.

That said, with travel, as with education, or interest in the arts, or really any technical or humanistic or cultural thing, America suffers from disparity between the achievement that it actually has made, and the cultural narrative with which it's saddled. For instance, an overwhelming amount of Nobel prizes and Fields Medals and patents belong to Americans, and yet we don't think of America as being a society of scientists or engineers. Some of the best symphony orchestras are American, and some of the best conductors and pianists and violinists are American citizens, and yet we don't think of America as a country of classical-music. Some of the tastiest beers are brewed in America, and yet with think of America as a country of Bud Lite.

In other words, the dominant narrative of America is pop-culture, common-denominator, Heartland blue-collar. The excellence that America offers is somehow blushingly hidden, and the mediocrity, boorishness and poor taste are proudly paraded. Returning to our theme, I am not persuaded that Americans as a people are somehow more insular, more dismissive of the world outside, more reluctant to travel, less intellectually curious, less interested in history or architecture or archaeology or anthropology, than are other peoples, or other nations. But the prevailing narrative says so. And the American voices that are more boorish, more insular, more populist, less curious and less sophisticated, are move voluble and more influential than are their opposites. America somehow relishes making itself look stupid.
See this is a prime example of someone calling most of us a bunch of rednecks with no culture and fear of travel outside our country. Only they did in nice words and phrases. Your disdain for your fellow citizens ( I assume) is palpable....
P.S. I've personally been around the world from Copenhagen to Omsk. From Muscat ,Djibouti and mogadishu to south korea and off the coast of vladivostok. East of west Home is best...
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Old 04-06-2019, 03:20 PM
 
537 posts, read 90,625 times
Reputation: 533
I can only speak for myself, and the reason is that I don't want to.


Growing up as a military brat, we moved around the U.S. but never went overseas. My dad went to Germany and that was about it. I've visited Canada, Mexico, and the Bahamas when in my teens and early 20s. I'm almost 60 now and in poor health after spending just about all my adult life caretaking and working more than I wanted to outside the home. When I say poor health, I mean serious respiratory, vision, and joint illlnesses. I've met enough people from other countries and have been exposed to other cultures about as much as I can handle these days. Guess I sound like a total jerk here but where I live, no need to go overseas to meet people from all over the world. Actually, just about everyone from anywhere seems to outnumber my demographic by far. At this point, I suppose my needs to see the world just aren't so strong, and maybe that's because I am naturally not much of an outgoing type of person - I'm insular. Also, I have a very small number of close family members left and although the few people I know outside of immediate family are nice, we have little in common. Never mind that travel is expensive. I would have to go it alone. And traveling all by myself again? I just did that and hated every minute of it. So no way. For me and all my health problems, it just doesn't make sense.
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Old 04-07-2019, 02:08 AM
 
1,175 posts, read 478,714 times
Reputation: 1932
Quote:
Originally Posted by aileesic View Post
I can only speak for myself, and the reason is that I don't want to.


Growing up as a military brat, we moved around the U.S. but never went overseas. My dad went to Germany and that was about it. I've visited Canada, Mexico, and the Bahamas when in my teens and early 20s. I'm almost 60 now and in poor health after spending just about all my adult life caretaking and working more than I wanted to outside the home. When I say poor health, I mean serious respiratory, vision, and joint illlnesses. I've met enough people from other countries and have been exposed to other cultures about as much as I can handle these days. Guess I sound like a total jerk here but where I live, no need to go overseas to meet people from all over the world. Actually, just about everyone from anywhere seems to outnumber my demographic by far. At this point, I suppose my needs to see the world just aren't so strong, and maybe that's because I am naturally not much of an outgoing type of person - I'm insular. Also, I have a very small number of close family members left and although the few people I know outside of immediate family are nice, we have little in common. Never mind that travel is expensive. I would have to go it alone. And traveling all by myself again? I just did that and hated every minute of it. So no way. For me and all my health problems, it just doesn't make sense.
Perfectly understandable. Poor health is normally a deal-breaker for travel (as are significant enough lack of time and funds), and the health issues you have will affect your ability to walk, ability to see, and stamina, all crucial for this activity.

Wonderful as travel is, itís physically demanding to some degree.
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Old 04-07-2019, 04:43 AM
 
12,694 posts, read 14,077,853 times
Reputation: 34800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
You must be kidding. We LIVED in Mexico and we loved it, but it didn't have "everything" we wanted.
If anyone is living where they have everything, they are dead and buried.
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