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Old 05-04-2019, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,019 posts, read 54,523,130 times
Reputation: 66369

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
I guess it's all in a relative perspective.

Maybe for you folks well acquainted with NYC and all it's boroughs and local centers of activity, it's a big separation and you're keenly aware of "how different" each little area is from it's neighbors.

For me, that 15-20 minute commute via cab was close by.

I had a couple of conferences there at the CSFB complex (at 11 Madison Ave) which ended in the mid-afternoon and having no further priorities for the day, I walked back to the hotel. Hoped I'd find something of interest to pass the time, maybe find a restaurant that captured my attention. I'd say it was an "interesting" walk to pass the time, but nothing that could be described as a pleasure even though I tried several different routes.

It takes me longer than that to get to town from my home, and 1/2 the drive is on a 75 mph highway.

PS: as a fan of SJPerelman, he wrote fondly about the Gramercy Park area he frequented for decades. I walked over there from the CSFB complex to peek in the Tavern and look around the neighborhood. There was simply no attraction about the place for me … I guess hangin' out at bars or upscale taverns isn't a focal point of my life although it seems to be a "big deal" for so many city dwellers. By way of comparison, in the context of this thread on C-D, it's interesting to note the place that the pubs take in London life, or the cafe's in Paris … apparently, social centers for so much of the population. Again, sitting around in such environments simply doesn't hold much interest for me, although we've had some excellent pub and café food in both cities. But to make that a focal point of our time there, to spend hours lingering around and drinking pints or wines for hours on end … no way for me.

When we were in Paris last year, I noticed several people sitting around at some of the cafe's in the late afternoon, holding forth at a sidewalk table. Hours later, when we went past on our way to a restaurant … around 8 pm … some of the same characters were still at the same tables, still with a glass of wine in hand. I'd have to say that it didn't hold much attraction for us … especially when we saw the same people at the same sidewalk locations the next day.
I used to work at One Madison, which was also owned by CFSB, for about seven years after somebody flew planes into my old office. Madison Square Park and the area around there is a popular spot for TV and movie scenes. One day you might see something familiar in a show and say, "AHA, that looks familiar."

True that New York is seen as a collection of small towns and neighborhoods, each with their own flavor. I worked downtown/WTC/FiDi for 20 years, and the Flatiron district was like a completely different place.

Gramercy Tavern is popular because it's owned by Danny Meyer, who is a celebrity chef in NYC. Have never been there, though. I liked walking that neighborhood because of the history, and NYC is a great place to walk if you're into its history, but of course not everyone is. I worked in the neighborhood and wasn't hanging out at the trendy places. Lived 40 miles away in suburban New Jersey, so once my workday was done, I was on the train for home.

As a matter of fact, I worked in NYC starting in 1979. Two years ago, I had to go to a meeting in the Empire State Building. That was the first and only time in my life I was ever inside of it.
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Old 05-04-2019, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,019 posts, read 54,523,130 times
Reputation: 66369
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
I guess it's all in a relative perspective.

Maybe for you folks well acquainted with NYC and all it's boroughs and local centers of activity, it's a big separation and you're keenly aware of "how different" each little area is from it's neighbors.

For me, that 15-20 minute commute via cab was close by.

I had a couple of conferences there at the CSFB complex (at 11 Madison Ave) which ended in the mid-afternoon and having no further priorities for the day, I walked back to the hotel. Hoped I'd find something of interest to pass the time, maybe find a restaurant that captured my attention. I'd say it was an "interesting" walk to pass the time, but nothing that could be described as a pleasure even though I tried several different routes.

It takes me longer than that to get to town from my home, and 1/2 the drive is on a 75 mph highway.

PS: as a fan of SJPerelman, he wrote fondly about the Gramercy Park area he frequented for decades. I walked over there from the CSFB complex to peek in the Tavern and look around the neighborhood. There was simply no attraction about the place for me … I guess hangin' out at bars or upscale taverns isn't a focal point of my life although it seems to be a "big deal" for so many city dwellers. By way of comparison, in the context of this thread on C-D, it's interesting to note the place that the pubs take in London life, or the cafe's in Paris … apparently, social centers for so much of the population. Again, sitting around in such environments simply doesn't hold much interest for me, although we've had some excellent pub and café food in both cities. But to make that a focal point of our time there, to spend hours lingering around and drinking pints or wines for hours on end … no way for me.

When we were in Paris last year, I noticed several people sitting around at some of the cafe's in the late afternoon, holding forth at a sidewalk table. Hours later, when we went past on our way to a restaurant … around 8 pm … some of the same characters were still at the same tables, still with a glass of wine in hand. I'd have to say that it didn't hold much attraction for us … especially when we saw the same people at the same sidewalk locations the next day.
I used to work at One Madison, which was also owned by CFSB, for about seven years after somebody flew planes into my old office. Madison Square Park and the area around there is a popular spot for TV and movie scenes. One day you might see something familiar in a show and say, "AHA, that looks familiar."

True that New York is seen as a collection of small towns and neighborhoods, each with their own flavor. I worked downtown/WTC/FiDi for 20 years, and the Flatiron district was like a completely different place.

Gramercy Tavern is popular because it's owned by Danny Meyer, who is a celebrity chef in NYC. Have never been there, though. I liked walking that neighborhood because of the history, and NYC is a great place to walk if you're into its history, but of course not everyone is. I worked in the neighborhood and wasn't hanging out at the trendy places. Lived 40 miles away in suburban New Jersey, so once my workday was done, I was on the train for home.

As a matter of fact, I worked in NYC starting in 1979. Two years ago, I had to go to a meeting in the Empire State Building. That was the first time in my life I was ever inside of it.
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Old 05-04-2019, 01:25 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,234 posts, read 19,531,226 times
Reputation: 12985
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Well, "every single human being in the whole world" is a bit of a problem. That would trash those three cities in short order.
They wouldn’t all be going to the cities at the same time of course.

People would be visiting over a period of decades. The majority of people would only ever visit each city once in their lifetime.
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Old 05-04-2019, 02:58 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,234 posts, read 19,531,226 times
Reputation: 12985
Realistically, only about 1 billion people in the world can probably ever have the means to visit these cities. Paris, New York and London are expensive for most people to even visit properly.

So, I meant this more as a recommendation for those who can make it there - if at all possible.
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Old 05-04-2019, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Northern Wisconsin
4,322 posts, read 2,257,613 times
Reputation: 1421
I uldnt mind visiting Paris and London those are two great cities in Europe
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
11,602 posts, read 3,970,957 times
Reputation: 7184
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Realistically, only about 1 billion people in the world can probably ever have the means to visit these cities. Paris, New York and London are expensive for most people to even visit properly.

So, I meant this more as a recommendation for those who can make it there - if at all possible.


I don't think evey single human being need visit, however all three are great cities.

I think in the future a lot of tourist sites are going to have to be increasingly protected, whilst due to environmental matters tourism is going to have to be much more environmentally friendly, although thankfully all three cities have good public transport systems.
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:33 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,234 posts, read 19,531,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
I detest everything about these cities. Why would I go?
Because there are very few cities or places in the world with the level of quality things to see and do as these cities.

The Louvre, the Eiffel Tower, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the British Museum... are just a few reasons why you should visit. Even the New York ballet is extraordinary. People should be exposed to this high level of culture.

But it is also about the quantity of such things. So much concentration in a small area.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:17 AM
 
Location: plano
6,565 posts, read 8,096,476 times
Reputation: 5797
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
There, I said it. If you haven’t been, then don’t think about it at all. Just go, at least once in your life.

Make sure your account balance is fat. You won’t be disappointed.
Been to all three multiple times, under whelmed. Your values do not match all the people's. Paris is the worst closely followed by dirty over crowded NYC, London is ok, dont mind seeing it or visiting for work which I did while Wife played tourist a few times.

Paris is probably my least favorite major city in the world, SF is second worst and NYC is third followed by Chicago then LA.

I ilke Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong and my home metros of DFW and Houston. Not a fan of Fla cities nor of Boston. I like Nashville though smaller than those mentioned.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:40 AM
 
978 posts, read 299,055 times
Reputation: 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherTouchOfWhimsy View Post
I've been to all three. I loved London, but I found Parisians rude and New York feels both intimidating and filthy to me. Yes, I know all big cities are dirty. New York seems almost as dirty as San Francisco, which I also found fairly disgusting. For Americans and people traveling to the USA, I'd recommend D.C. as the one city not to miss. Culture, amazing museums (which are free!), the National Mall, plus all the big-city amenities you'd expect like a Chinatown, lots of eating options (including food trucks during the workday), an easy to use subway system, etc. There are homeless people, of course, and some of the areas are sketchy, but in general D.C. is far superior to NYC, IMO. I will agree that if you can only go to one foreign country to see a big city, London is a great option. I'd skip Paris, honestly... go somewhere in Switzerland instead. Zurich, maybe.
I've found Zurich as dirty as NYC.

The thing about NYC (and probably most cities) is it depends heavily on the mayor. Some mayors are lousy resulting in a dirty, less taken care of city. Rudy Giuliani, may not be anyone favorite person, but boy, he was a great mayor. NYC was much cleaner under his term.

As for Parisians, I think they have had it will tourist treating their city like a Disneyland. I was in Paris at a lovely restaurant, everyone was speaking softy, except for a family from Texas. Lordy, they were shouting at each other. They behaved as if they were alone in their kitchen without any regard for anyone else.

My husband speaks French. At least, I try. We speak at the same volume as the French. I've never seen Parisians as anything but nice.

I never been to SF and never plan on going.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:47 AM
 
978 posts, read 299,055 times
Reputation: 2136
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post

Even the New York ballet is extraordinary. People should be exposed to this high level of culture.

But it is also about the quantity of such things. So much concentration in a small area.
The NY Ballet is extraordinary. I've seen the same ballets a few times, like the Nutcracker or Jewels. Never fails to thrill.

There are so many smaller events like Music Before 1800. https://mb1800.org . Concerts and lectures at the Metropolitan Museum's Cloisters location. Their medieval gardens are worth making a trip for.

Even Evensong at St. John the Divine's chorus is special. The Hungarian Pastry shop across the street is great.

There are so many wonderful things to see. It takes a little bit of curiosity.
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