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Old 05-04-2019, 12:32 AM
 
Location: San Josť, CA
3,264 posts, read 5,781,929 times
Reputation: 3176

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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveklein View Post
Also entirely possible he is working for some hotel chain just trying to spread as much negative press about airbnb as possible.
Ruining Airbnbs one post on CD at a time?

I'm a General Manager of a hotel and I use Airbnb! I also host!

The truth is that Airbnb isn't a threat to hotel business. Sometimes your plans make more sense to use a hotel and sometimes, Airbnbs make more sense. It's great to have options. There aren't anywhere near the amount of available rooms or places to stay to have any affect at all on a hotel's RevPar.
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Old 05-04-2019, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Tulsa
1,800 posts, read 804,562 times
Reputation: 1839
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I've got to agree with other poster, if almost every airbnb experience you have is terrible the problem is you and your expectations. I get that you have very strong feelings about this hospitality exchange dealie since you post basically the same thing dozens of times about how glorious it is and how much airbnb is terrible, and that's great you've got something you like and works for you, but come on there is something going on if every airbnb is bad.
His speech reminds me of Donald Trump.
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Old 05-04-2019, 05:51 AM
 
2,379 posts, read 1,210,617 times
Reputation: 5122
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
I would expect the tipping of hotel housekeeping personnel to take a drastic dive if the hotel industry began charging a separate cleaning fee for the accommodations.
This is the most common misconception I run across.

Hotels DO charge a "cleaning fee"....it's just rolled into the cost of the room. And with multiple rooms rented separately it's spread out over the entire property.

In the vast majority of Airbnb it's a single home or room and the cleaning fee iis flat. We actually experimented with rolling the cleaning fee into the nightly charge and not having it separate. There was no difference in tipping the crew.

Just like "free" shipping (not free. Just rolled into the price of the item) there's always a cleaning fee wherever you stay. It may just not be separately noted. Sometimes people get antsy about paying it but don't realize that they are always paying someone to clean in any guest stay situation.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:01 AM
 
2,379 posts, read 1,210,617 times
Reputation: 5122
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
I would expect the tipping of hotel housekeeping personnel to take a drastic dive if the hotel industry began charging a separate cleaning fee for the accommodations.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
His speech reminds me of Donald Trump.
I honestly don't understand that posters point. It doesn't have anything to do with this topic. Perhaps they can start something about whatever their hospitality stay thing is.

I stated in the n the OP that we don't share space with any of our guests in our Airbnb, so not sure exactly what the plan is for multiple posts about non Airbnb accommodation that shares space?
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:10 AM
 
2,379 posts, read 1,210,617 times
Reputation: 5122
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
I think people are just pigs.

1. Ask for specific food items (like a room service request).
2. Guests feel the need to "sneak" the animal onto the property.
3. Not representing the number accurately on the reservation.

I think many people use Airbnb because it is cheaper and they want to get as much for their money as they can.


We stay at an Airbnb on Peaks Island, ME. We had our dogs (we had long email exchanges about them with the order). We treated it like a rental house.
We have it posted in our house rules what we expect when it comes to furry guests and about half our guests follow it to the letter. But many guests try to be sly. There's truly no need to. I don't know why people do this.

Knock wood, we have not had any issues with damage from pets. We don't expect pets to be let loose in the yard unsupervised as it's a big several acre property and not fully fenced with other wildlife around This gives some owners pause as they just want to let the dog out without watching them. But how do you know when it goes to the bathroom if you just open the door and let it roam for hours? We know that those guests will be leaving "gifts" for the landscaper who cleans up the yard and cuts the grass, so we prefer not to have that happen.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Hampstead NC
5,578 posts, read 5,091,475 times
Reputation: 14060
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Of course I understand Air B&B...

Alternative options for overnight lodging, from Retreat centers to Shared space and everything in between.

When I stay in a private home, I would much rather support someone who has a purpose and bent for hospitality (and have been doing it for many years, than someone who is trying to SAVE their home / help with house payments / casualty losses / make income by joining unregulated portion of a very (personally) vulnerable industry.

The majority of our Hospitality hosts DONATE all their hospitality earnings to charity or needy travelers (not much when overnight + meal is $20 for entire family).

I have several relatives they do Air B&B on their guest homes, but they have the best results with 'referrals' / personal friends.

Air B&B guests are an equal PITA, on the 'entitlement side/, so say many of our hosts who do both.

Let's see... $220 for Air B&B vs $20 + meals for a Hospitality stay... Most our hosts prefer to go the 'hospitality route' Sometimes we have joint shared with those paying $220. They have their 'expectations', and we have none... just a lot of relationship building and fun.

Pick your poison, nothing is perfect.
We are all different.

We love hosting (Been doing it since 1982, my parents and grandparents have done it for generations.
I guess I don't understand what you mean by Hospitality Stay and how you find one.

People are people where ever you go. I find reviews to be good resources and thus far have matched my own experiences. I've never stayed at an Air BnB that wasn't exactly as advertised. The service is greatly appreciated by this schoolteacher!
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Hampstead NC
5,578 posts, read 5,091,475 times
Reputation: 14060
Quote:
Originally Posted by evening sun View Post
I have yet to find Airbnb that is cheaper than a motel anywhere we travel to. so I have no problems staying in a cheap motel, at least I know what to expect. At least the front desk is open all night. I am ot going to pay more to have the "privilege" of staying in someones home where I do not know the standard of hygiene etc.
If you can't find an AirBnB cheaper than a motel you aren't doing it right.

As for hygeine...
Dirty Hotel Room: These Are the Germiest Places | Time.com
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Old 05-04-2019, 07:08 AM
 
10,181 posts, read 12,235,799 times
Reputation: 14047
I've stayed in both. My parents took us to Europe and stayed in B&B's frequently when we were kids.

Stayed with a woman in Ireland on a farm. She lived there her whole life, outlived her whole family. So we got to go take eggs from the barn and minutes later we had breakfast. She was telling us her life story at breakfast when she announced that she was actually born on that actual kitchen table! That was a little much.

I think the airb&b model has trouble with technology. Too many small cameras, opportunities for cyber trouble if you get the wrong "host!" The people trying to run them for a profit, like buy a condo and rent it out to cover the cost of the condo type deals are most likely to misunderstand the model while annoying the condo/HOA in the process.

https://gizmodo.com/this-airbnb-spyi...ing-1831818233
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Old 05-04-2019, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,685 posts, read 8,472,440 times
Reputation: 29359
Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
As someone who owns a few Airbnbs now and has stayed in both hotels and Airbnbs all over the place I'm really fascinated by the way guests either embrace or misunderstand the difference in the with these types of stays. I thought it would be interesting to see what others think. (We don't share space with any of our guests and are at least a half hour away from each property if not more.)

For example, in one of our Airbnbs four people is the max capacity and we have a nominal fee over two guests for the additional wear and tear in the property. We have had families of up to 8 squeeze into the space and ask if we can provide extra air mattresses while not representing the number accurately on the reservation. When asked the answer was that hotels don't keep track and it was just expected to be the same.

We are pet friendly in one location and ask that guests disclose if they are bringing a pet so that we can alert the cleaning crew to travel with their heavy duty pet hair vacuum. Though we are not charging additional fees for pets you would be surprised at how many guests feel the need to "sneak" the animal onto the property. We just want a heads up for the cleaners.

With Airbnb the host may stop by or check you in. We have visited our properties with notice on a few occasions and had to help people with lock outs etcs. Sometimes guests seem extremely freaked out by this. We say our our profile that we give guests space but are available and don't ever just show up without warning or a good reason. In my own experience as a guest I have always enjoyed meeting the host so I just expect that it's possible if not probable.

We leave snacks but have had guests call during their stay and ask for specific food items (like a room service request). As far as I know the cleaning crew has never been tipped in any location but in a hotel it would be common.

I think a lot of savvy travelers know that Airbnb is very different from a hotel in many ways but as it gains ground new guests are often confused by this stay format. What do you find are the big differences and things that surprised you about staying at an Airbnb?
Incorrect. I doubt hotel cleaners are frequently tipped just for doing their job and Air B&B guests tip the cleaners even more rarely. They certainly should not be expected to tip cleaners when they are being charged a separate cleaning fee. As for OP's claim that the cleaning fee is rolled into the cost of the room, of course it is. But Air B&B's model makes the cost much more obvious and the host sets the price, which in my view is too high in many cases. But that's because it's only two of use staying without pets, and we are courteous and clean up after ourselves so we aren't nasty guests. Add in the cost of a "deposit" that a lot of them charge and a "service fee" Air B&B always tacks on for 24-7 support (something you get from a hotel automatically,) free breakfast from many hotels, and often a more convenient location, and those serve as reasons we as guests would choose a hotel over a private home or room. Thus, we stay at the Air B&B's far less often than we used to, opting for hotels instead. If someone is new to Air B&B, it would be understandable for them to be a little confused by the difference, I agree.

Last edited by Scooby Snacks; 05-04-2019 at 07:23 AM..
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Old 05-04-2019, 07:45 AM
 
2,379 posts, read 1,210,617 times
Reputation: 5122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Incorrect. I doubt hotel cleaners are frequently tipped just for doing their job and Air B&B guests tip the cleaners even more rarely. They certainly should not be expected to tip cleaners when they are being charged a separate cleaning fee. As for OP's claim that the cleaning fee is rolled into the cost of the room, of course it is. But Air B&B's model makes the cost much more obvious and the host sets the price, which in my view is too high in many cases. But that's because it's only two of use staying without pets, and we are courteous and clean up after ourselves so we aren't nasty guests. Add in the cost of a "deposit" that a lot of them charge and a "service fee" Air B&B always tacks on for 24-7 support (something you get from a hotel automatically,) free breakfast from many hotels, and often a more convenient location, and those serve as reasons we as guests would choose a hotel over a private home or room. Thus, we stay at the Air B&B's far less often than we used to, opting for hotels instead. If someone is new to Air B&B, it would be understandable for them to be a little confused by the difference, I agree.
We traveled to new Orleans recently. We have our favorite hotels that we stay in when we go. Average price for this trip? $345 a night. Average price for the Airbnb we booked instead? $125 per night. We got parking (not free at the hotel and honestly we don't rent a car in new Orleans) WiFi, outdoor space and an espresso machine. The hotel has $35 a day parking, $10 a day wifi and a "continental" breakfast which we never used to partake in. Beds were just as comfortable. Location was quieter with our Airbnb but walkable to everywhere we wanted. Host was helpful. Place was as clean or cleaner than the hotels in the city. There was no deposit. No hidden fees.

In our own properties we don't ask for deposits unless there is an event. One is suitable for parties but we don't book them through Airbnb. Our cleaning fees are very reasonable: so much so that they don't cover the entire cost of the service because if we did advertise then as such it would scare people away who have clearly never hired a housekeeper and don't understand that they can be expensive (balance of costs are covered by the nightly fee). Airbnb also has a pledge to pay cleaning staff
living wage. Many who balk at the fees contribute to the undervaluing of this labor. We have superhost status in a if our places save the one that we just put up two months ago.

I'm not saying Airbnb doesn't have variable quality. But I do think that people have expectations that sometimes don't match this model for accommodation. And that is the only point of this thread. I have personally not found Airbnb to be problematic on the whole as a guest, and I was a guest long before I was a host. But it does take some getting used to. On the whole, I will say that they are often more economical. But sometimes I want room service and a spa in the building. There's a niche for everyone, but the experience is different.
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