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Old 05-04-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Tulsa
1,806 posts, read 809,379 times
Reputation: 1845

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Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
We traveled to new Orleans recently. We have our favorite hotels that we stay in when we go. Average price for this trip? $345 a night. Average price for the Airbnb we booked instead? $125 per night. We got parking (not free at the hotel and honestly we don't rent a car in new Orleans) WiFi, outdoor space and an espresso machine. The hotel has $35 a day parking, $10 a day wifi and a "continental" breakfast which we never used to partake in. Beds were just as comfortable. Location was quieter with our Airbnb but walkable to everywhere we wanted. Host was helpful. Place was as clean or cleaner than the hotels in the city. There was no deposit. No hidden fees.

In our own properties we don't ask for deposits unless there is an event. One is suitable for parties but we don't book them through Airbnb. Our cleaning fees are very reasonable: so much so that they don't cover the entire cost of the service because if we did advertise then as such it would scare people away who have clearly never hired a housekeeper and don't understand that they can be expensive (balance of costs are covered by the nightly fee). Airbnb also has a pledge to pay cleaning staff
living wage. Many who balk at the fees contribute to the undervaluing of this labor. We have superhost status in a if our places save the one that we just put up two months ago.

I'm not saying Airbnb doesn't have variable quality. But I do think that people have expectations that sometimes don't match this model for accommodation. And that is the only point of this thread. I have personally not found Airbnb to be problematic on the whole as a guest, and I was a guest long before I was a host. But it does take some getting used to. On the whole, I will say that they are often more economical. But sometimes I want room service and a spa in the building. There's a niche for everyone, but the experience is different.
I too find hidden charges annoying. Most upscale hotels in decent locations charge these fees, and some of them want you to buy their overpriced bottled water. I haven't stayed in a single Airbnb that doesn't provide free parking/internet.

The cleaning fee is interesting. Airbnb charges one-time cleaning fee no matter you stay one night or three nights because it's only cleaned once, which is economical for an extended stay but pricey for a quick one night crash.

I try to stay in better Airbnb rentals and I'm willing to pay a decent price. What I find kind of disappointing in Airbnb is that some hosts do not use high-quality pillow/bedding as upscale hotels do. They have already invested a lot into their rental(property,furnitures), why not go one step further to make the stay perfect?
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,179 posts, read 11,803,134 times
Reputation: 32193
I tip in hotels because my room is cleaned every day. I'm tipping the person who is providing a personal service directly to me, and they are getting the tip when they are performing that service. I don't tip the person who cleaned it in preparation for my arrival - I mean, yes, there's a good chance it's the same person but it's not like I leave double the first morning with a note saying "this is for yesterday too." I look at airbnb in that way - I could leave a tip at the end of the stay, but the cleaning crew is really working for the host, not me, in that case. There is no personal service being provided to me. Maybe it's not fair, and I'm saying this as someone who always leaves a tip when I stay in a hotel, but I just don't see them as being the same situation.

I think they can be convenient at times but they usually aren't my first choice. And while I have stayed at and enjoyed traditional b&b's, I definitely wouldn't stay in a host-occupied airbnb, unless it was something like a casita or other truly separate area.
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Old 05-04-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,555 posts, read 2,325,331 times
Reputation: 2818
Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
....
I think a lot of savvy travelers know that Airbnb is very different from a hotel in many ways but as it gains ground new guests are often confused by this stay format. What do you find are the big differences and things that surprised you about staying at an Airbnb?
owners dont pay hospitality taxes nor commercial property insurance. its interesting the government allows owners to operate even though they are technically illegal:
Unwelcome guests: Airbnb, cities battle over illegal short-term rentals

Last edited by stanley-88888888; 05-04-2019 at 01:42 PM..
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:55 PM
 
2,386 posts, read 1,216,910 times
Reputation: 5132
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
owners dont pay hospitality taxes nor commercial property insurance. its interesting the government allows owners to operate even though they are technically illegal:
Unwelcome guests: Airbnb, cities battle over illegal short-term rentals
Incorrect. Like anything your taxes depend on your city/state. We pay both commercial property taxes and hospitality tax iin different locations. Some if our rentals do not incur these charges. But that's not up to us. It's up to the jurisdiction.
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:00 PM
 
2,386 posts, read 1,216,910 times
Reputation: 5132
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
I tip in hotels because my room is cleaned every day. I'm tipping the person who is providing a personal service directly to me, and they are getting the tip when they are performing that service. I don't tip the person who cleaned it in preparation for my arrival - I mean, yes, there's a good chance it's the same person but it's not like I leave double the first morning with a note saying "this is for yesterday too." I look at airbnb in that way - I could leave a tip at the end of the stay, but the cleaning crew is really working for the host, not me, in that case. There is no personal service being provided to me. Maybe it's not fair, and I'm saying this as someone who always leaves a tip when I stay in a hotel, but I just don't see them as being the same situation.

I think they can be convenient at times but they usually aren't my first choice. And while I have stayed at and enjoyed traditional b&b's, I definitely wouldn't stay in a host-occupied airbnb, unless it was something like a casita or other truly separate area.

I'm totally lost on this logic about tips but I do find it really interesting.
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:21 AM
 
6,978 posts, read 3,875,045 times
Reputation: 14884
Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
This is the most common misconception I run across.

Hotels DO charge a "cleaning fee"....it's just rolled into the cost of the room. And with multiple rooms rented separately it's spread out over the entire property.

In the vast majority of Airbnb it's a single home or room and the cleaning fee iis flat. We actually experimented with rolling the cleaning fee into the nightly charge and not having it separate. There was no difference in tipping the crew.

Just like "free" shipping (not free. Just rolled into the price of the item) there's always a cleaning fee wherever you stay. It may just not be separately noted. Sometimes people get antsy about paying it but don't realize that they are always paying someone to clean in any guest stay situation.
It's not a misconception, it is a fact which is why I used the term "separate cleaning fee." Of course hotels include cleaning costs in their pricing policies but even in hotels there is a backlash when certain services are billed separately but not as customer selected options. See wi-fi, parking and resort fees.

Airbnb was predicated on the premise that there is some kind of link other than economic between the customer and "host" in his own home but has widely evolved to be largely premises that are owned solely to be income producers. There's nothing wrong with that and believe I am probably in the vast majority who prefers such hotel-like privacy to cohabitation. It was originally about owners who cared for the clients and the accommodations themselves and that includes cleaning; why pay a separate fee? It is also my understanding that the room fee is subject to the commission paid to Airbnb while the cleaning fee is not and can have tax advantages to those owners who report that income.

Perhaps Airbnb should give up the congenial host charade and call you guys what you are, property owners and business people.
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Old 05-05-2019, 06:32 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,555 posts, read 2,325,331 times
Reputation: 2818
Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
Incorrect. Like anything your taxes depend on your city/state. We pay both commercial property taxes and hospitality tax iin different locations. Some if our rentals do not incur these charges. But that's not up to us. It's up to the jurisdiction.
o.k., but its still illegal in many jurisdictions (like ride-share companys) because they operate without regulation but it seems like the only city actively pursuing them is miami.

much like traffic enforcement, it seems like a money making scheme for the city.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:46 AM
 
83 posts, read 16,740 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
As someone who owns a few Airbnbs now and has stayed in both hotels and Airbnbs all over the place I'm really fascinated by the way guests either embrace or misunderstand the difference in the with these types of stays. I thought it would be interesting to see what others think. (We don't share space with any of our guests and are at least a half hour away from each property if not more.)

For example, in one of our Airbnbs four people is the max capacity and we have a nominal fee over two guests for the additional wear and tear in the property. We have had families of up to 8 squeeze into the space and ask if we can provide extra air mattresses while not representing the number accurately on the reservation. When asked the answer was that hotels don't keep track and it was just expected to be the same.

We are pet friendly in one location and ask that guests disclose if they are bringing a pet so that we can alert the cleaning crew to travel with their heavy duty pet hair vacuum. Though we are not charging additional fees for pets you would be surprised at how many guests feel the need to "sneak" the animal onto the property. We just want a heads up for the cleaners.

With Airbnb the host may stop by or check you in. We have visited our properties with notice on a few occasions and had to help people with lock outs etcs. Sometimes guests seem extremely freaked out by this. We say our our profile that we give guests space but are available and don't ever just show up without warning or a good reason. In my own experience as a guest I have always enjoyed meeting the host so I just expect that it's possible if not probable.

We leave snacks but have had guests call during their stay and ask for specific food items (like a room service request). As far as I know the cleaning crew has never been tipped in any location but in a hotel it would be common.

I think a lot of savvy travelers know that Airbnb is very different from a hotel in many ways but as it gains ground new guests are often confused by this stay format. What do you find are the big differences and things that surprised you about staying at an Airbnb?
When I travel, I tend to ONLY stay at hotels or time share properties. The reason being is, I'm very much focused on safety, security, cleanliness and privacy. I couldn't even imagine staying at a stranger's home, because I'd be thinking that the person could enter the home at any time. Also, I'd worry about possible hidden cameras. I read a story about one guy who rented out his property with a hidden camera in the bathroom and bedroom. You really don't know what you're getting into when you go to a random stranger's home. The spirt and energy of the home could also be off, if the owner or people who rent at the property are into unsavory activities/behaviors.

Also, because cleaning practices are not standardized for air bnb rentals, one wouldn't know if the sheets and bedspreads were truly cleaned appropriately. There's just too much uncertainty. If I want more space, I'll rent a time share unit or book a suite at the Hyatt House, which has wonderful accommodations for longer stays.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:05 AM
 
9,693 posts, read 4,566,593 times
Reputation: 12601
Quote:
Originally Posted by evening sun View Post
I have yet to find Airbnb that is cheaper than a motel anywhere we travel to.

Makes me curious about where and when you travel. Your experience is obviously in the small minority else there would be no bnb business. I've found bnb most useful in high-demand tourist areas at high-demand times (i.e. Florida beaches on Memorial weekend) when hotel rooms are either booked solid or jacked up sky high.



I think the biggest difference is consistency. Obviously some hotels are much better than others but they all work in the same basic process and offer some variation of the same product. Air bnb can literally be anything, from a full house to a small room to a boat to an RV camper. Check in/out procedures, room cleaning, amenities provided, and house rules can be all over the map. Safest course for both guests and owners is to make no assumptions. The owner needs to explicitly mention any expectations they have in their posting and the guest needs to ask about any expectations not listed in the posting.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:26 AM
 
3,981 posts, read 1,704,754 times
Reputation: 8108
Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
Makes me curious about where and when you travel. Your experience is obviously in the small minority else there would be no bnb business. I've found bnb most useful in high-demand tourist areas at high-demand times (i.e. Florida beaches on Memorial weekend) when hotel rooms are either booked solid or jacked up sky high.



I think the biggest difference is consistency. Obviously some hotels are much better than others but they all work in the same basic process and offer some variation of the same product. Air bnb can literally be anything, from a full house to a small room to a boat to an RV camper. Check in/out procedures, room cleaning, amenities provided, and house rules can be all over the map. Safest course for both guests and owners is to make no assumptions. The owner needs to explicitly mention any expectations they have in their posting and the guest needs to ask about any expectations not listed in the posting.
It also depends on the type or accommodations you want. I have looked for places for very short stays with two beds (not one couch and one bed) and to get a comparable location to a hotel, the prices are usually better for the hotels. I am not going during high season. I also looked for when I was moving to my current area and there was nothing whatsoever nearby. The closest place was a one-hour drive. It made no sense.
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