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Old 05-10-2019, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
11,620 posts, read 3,978,642 times
Reputation: 7200

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Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Well, some places do make it difficult. Try getting visas to Russia, India, Nepal or Brazil. Some are just a lot of paperwork, some are very expensive. Of course, all countries in the EU have to be consistent so Italy, for example, can't require a tourist visa and charge you $300 for it. Non-EU countries, though, could easily stem the flow of tourists if they instituted a cumbersome visa requirement.
The problem is worse in relation to ancient monuments, foot paths and places that can face erosion through sheer weight of footfall.

Most of the European destinations are cities, indeed some cities have the infrastructure to deal with massive tourism and have built hotels to accomodate tourists.

As for Airbnb it usually involves a property that would have been lived in, if it were not rented out to tourists, so it possible has a less severe impact that lots of new hotels.
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:22 AM
 
Location: On the road
5,939 posts, read 2,891,210 times
Reputation: 11361
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
I would never begrudge the Chinese, in particular, their ability to travel. There is absolutely no reason why we in the west should feel we have the right to enjoy travelling and other people should not. I know that the older Chinese have often had very difficult lives, including periods of starvation, and I think it is great to see them out enjoying the world.
I begrudge many (but not all) of the Chinese tourists for their behavior, which isn't within worldwide norms for a polite and civilized society. Of course there are folks from every country that behave poorly, but as a whole China is quite over represented in the loutish behavior category.
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Caribou, Me.
5,491 posts, read 3,911,536 times
Reputation: 4048
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I begrudge many (but not all) of the Chinese tourists for their behavior, which isn't within worldwide norms for a polite and civilized society. Of course there are folks from every country that behave poorly, but as a whole China is quite over represented in the loutish behavior category.
They are legendary. And for a good reason.
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:13 AM
 
13,903 posts, read 7,400,560 times
Reputation: 25389
Quote:
Originally Posted by maineguy8888 View Post
They are legendary. And for a good reason.
From my personal life experience traveling through Europe, Americans have cornered the market on loutish behavior. As an American who has been traveling frequently to Europe for 50 years, itís embarrassing to be lumped into that group. They generally outnumber the Chinese tourists 50:1. The Chinese are like the Japanese 30 years ago when most Japanese traveled in large groups. Pretty easy to avoid.

As far as over-tourism goes, Iím part of the problem. There are just too many affluent people in the world with the ability to travel. We all go to the cliche places at least once.
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:39 AM
 
9,193 posts, read 9,271,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
I would never begrudge the Chinese, in particular, their ability to travel. There is absolutely no reason why we in the west should feel we have the right to enjoy travelling and other people should not. I know that the older Chinese have often had very difficult lives, including periods of starvation, and I think it is great to see them out enjoying the world.

Having said that, many countries are struggling to manage the increase in tourism, making the experience much less enjoyable than it was in the past. Apparently the numbers of tour groups visiting placesin Utah is causing a lot of pressure. I have to say we have never had worse value than we had when staying in Yellowstone last year at one of the park lodges. I think we paid about $US300 for a room that was dirty and the food on offer was dreadful. They obviously had no need to provide value.

The prices for tourists in Vietnam have also increased a lot in recent years. Their occupancy rates are extremely high as the number of foreign tourists has tripled in about six years.

Don't know the solution except to look for places less travelled.
I could write a subsection about how tourism is affecting our national parks. I happen to be quite familiar with the national parks in Utah and Yellowstone National Park as well as a number of others.

In many parks, it is now necessary to take a bus or a shuttle to all of the points of interest--at least during summer months. Zion National Park in Utah is a good example of this. The park is relatively small and the road system that exists in the park simply does not support a high volume of automobile traffic. Substantial parking and camping facilities have been created, but its difficult to get even a parking space at the visitor center from May through September. Arches National Park in Utah is relatively small and traffic can literally be backed up for blocks at the entrance gate off US Highway 191. Once inside the park, one learns that parking spaces can be very rare commodities indeed. Some people idle their vehicles in parking lots waiting for cars to leave. Yellowstone National Park is a very popular park with huge visitation in the summer months. However, the problems are somewhat limited in Yellowstone because of the park's large size and its distance from any major city. Nevertheless, going to a place in the park like the Old Faithful Geyser is disturbing in summer months. The geyser is jammed with tourists waiting for the next eruption.

Since I've been to most of these parks, I decided a few years ago to give it a rest. The crowds were overwhelming and I decided that the best thing I could was simply let others enjoy them while I chose to visit some other locations.

It is clear to me that the popularity of most national parks threatens them. The National Park Service is going to have to do more and more every year to protect these crown jewels of America's public lands.
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Old 05-10-2019, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,406 posts, read 1,669,820 times
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^^^ I was in Glacier NP about 25 years and it was literally impossible to stop your car legally. Every permissible pull-off from the only road was fully occupied.


Want an uncrowded park, go to Big Bend.
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Old 05-11-2019, 12:19 AM
 
Location: Australia
902 posts, read 330,269 times
Reputation: 1657
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
I could write a subsection about how tourism is affecting our national parks. I happen to be quite familiar with the national parks in Utah and Yellowstone National Park as well as a number of others.

In many parks, it is now necessary to take a bus or a shuttle to all of the points of interest--at least during summer months. Zion National Park in Utah is a good example of this. The park is relatively small and the road system that exists in the park simply does not support a high volume of automobile traffic. Substantial parking and camping facilities have been created, but its difficult to get even a parking space at the visitor center from May through September. Arches National Park in Utah is relatively small and traffic can literally be backed up for blocks at the entrance gate off US Highway 191. Once inside the park, one learns that parking spaces can be very rare commodities indeed. Some people idle their vehicles in parking lots waiting for cars to leave. Yellowstone National Park is a very popular park with huge visitation in the summer months. However, the problems are somewhat limited in Yellowstone because of the park's large size and its distance from any major city. Nevertheless, going to a place in the park like the Old Faithful Geyser is disturbing in summer months. The geyser is jammed with tourists waiting for the next eruption.

Since I've been to most of these parks, I decided a few years ago to give it a rest. The crowds were overwhelming and I decided that the best thing I could was simply let others enjoy them while I chose to visit some other locations.

It is clear to me that the popularity of most national parks threatens them. The National Park Service is going to have to do more and more every year to protect these crown jewels of America's public lands.
We went to the five parks in southern Utah as well as Yellowstone in June last year. The scenery was incredible and overall it was a fantastic experience. My favourite was Arches which is unlike anywhere I have been on the planet. We were happy with the shuttles but sometimes the parking was indeed a headache. As we live in a big city with parking issues we just dealt with it. The most difficult aspect for as was the prices we had to pay for mediocre accomodation. I understand it is a function of dynamic pricing and of a short tourist season in some places but it also points to an under supply of accomodation.

We live near the second oldest national park in the world, after Yellowstone. It is on the outskirts of Sydney but there is no accomodation in it. It is extremely popular at Christmas and other public holidays for picnics and other activities.The management have just have to start closing it when the parking grounds are full. All over Sydney along the highways there are advisory signs indicating this when it happens.
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Old 05-11-2019, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,406 posts, read 1,669,820 times
Reputation: 8018
There are thousands of mountains in the US. After the coal miners blow the tops off them, we can put parking lots on the flat tops, and make room for millions of tourists who can.t enjoy a vista without mountains..
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Old 05-11-2019, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Long Island, New York
468 posts, read 166,940 times
Reputation: 1447
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
We went to the five parks in southern Utah as well as Yellowstone in June last year. The scenery was incredible and overall it was a fantastic experience. My favourite was Arches which is unlike anywhere I have been on the planet. We were happy with the shuttles but sometimes the parking was indeed a headache. As we live in a big city with parking issues we just dealt with it. The most difficult aspect for as was the prices we had to pay for mediocre accomodation. I understand it is a function of dynamic pricing and of a short tourist season in some places but it also points to an under supply of accomodation.
I just read this but can't personally state if they are truly underrated. But will find out when I begin my year long road trip by car which I had to postpone once already due to a sudden health issue....itching to go so soon hopefully. The highway is calling me...

The 50 most underrated parks in America

https://www.theactivetimes.com/trave...-parks-america
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Old 05-12-2019, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Australia
902 posts, read 330,269 times
Reputation: 1657
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY 915 View Post
I just read this but can't personally state if they are truly underrated. But will find out when I begin my year long road trip by car which I had to postpone once already due to a sudden health issue....itching to go so soon hopefully. The highway is calling me...

The 50 most underrated parks in America

https://www.theactivetimes.com/trave...-parks-america
You absolutely must get to them if you can. We have always found the scenery and parks in Nth America to be the greatest attraction for us. DH would love to return to see more of them. I said I cannot stand the long flight again but my resolve is already weakening.
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