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Old 06-05-2009, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Where we enjoy all four seasons
20,799 posts, read 8,705,855 times
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First off I am a really bad flyer anyway and it takes a tranquilizer to get me on a plane. We flew Jet Blue from Boston to Vegas November 2007 and our seats were right over the engine at the exit seats. We noticed that we were flying cross country very low and we noticed the flight attendant was acting strange leaning over people's seats whispering in the other attendant's ear and then getting on the phone to the cockpit.
It turns out the the engine where we were sitting had gone out.

The pilot made an announcement that we had lost the engine and that we would see some emergency apparatus when we ATTEMPTED a landing. This was about 1/2 hour before we were to land and my thought was I hope we don't lose the other one. They told us this was common........HUH???????
Well when we were making our approach I think every single ambulance in Nevada was lining the runway.....we did touch down okay but when we took a doubletake we were being followed by the ambulances fire apparatus and every emergency vehicle available to escort us to the gate.
We sure worried about when it was time to go home. Luckily all was well.
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Old 06-05-2009, 08:34 AM
 
11,922 posts, read 21,508,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum Mike View Post
I saw the spoilers retract and I heard the thrust on the engines increase almost immediately, which was another indication they weren't paying attention to the airspeed in the flight deck until the stall warning sounded


Food for thought but when you put the spoilers out you typically have the thrust at idle (otherwise it would defeat the point of adding drag). So a natural occurrence is to add power when the spoilers are retracted.
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Old 06-05-2009, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
51,816 posts, read 29,888,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
Food for thought but when you put the spoilers out you typically have the thrust at idle (otherwise it would defeat the point of adding drag). So a natural occurrence is to add power when the spoilers are retracted.
Absolutely, but the shudder that was felt, definitely indicated the captain and first officer were preoccupied with something else in the flight deck, and not paying attention to the airspeed until the stall warning sounded. I also remember when the spoilers were retracted, the thrust was increased to a level higher than I've normally seen after spoiler retraction, and we felt a faster than normal airspeed increase, which indicated they pushed those throttle levers way up there, probably in panic.

Believe it or not, just a few days later, and you might remember this, 2 America West Airlines pilots were fired for being under the influence of alcohol. Authorities stopped the aircraft just before it was pushed back from the gate, and they were removed from the aircraft, at an airport in Florida.

Last edited by Magnum Mike; 06-05-2009 at 09:18 AM..
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Old 06-05-2009, 10:03 AM
 
11,922 posts, read 21,508,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum Mike View Post
Absolutely, but the shudder that was felt, definitely indicated the captain and first officer were preoccupied with something else in the flight deck, and not paying attention to the airspeed until the stall warning sounded. I also remember when the spoilers were retracted, the thrust was increased to a level higher than I've normally seen after spoiler retraction, and we felt a faster than normal airspeed increase, which indicated they pushed those throttle levers way up there, probably in panic.

Believe it or not, just a few days later, and you might remember this, 2 America West Airlines pilots were fired for being under the influence of alcohol. Authorities stopped the aircraft just before it was pushed back from the gate, and they were removed from the aircraft, at an airport in Florida.

You are as bad if not worse than the media.

BTW it's normal to slow at 10,000 feet.
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Old 06-05-2009, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
51,816 posts, read 29,888,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
You are as bad if not worse than the media.

BTW it's normal to slow at 10,000 feet.
Being compared to the media like that was uncalled for, and yes I know about the descent procedures and slowing down and maintaining airspeed of no more than 250 knots TAS below 10,000 feet.
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Old 06-05-2009, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
51,816 posts, read 29,888,322 times
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Getting back to the topic, I experienced 2 significant events during flights. One time in 1971, I was 14 back then, and we were on a flight from London Heathrow, to Chicago, on BOAC, which later became British Airways. The aircraft was a Vickers VC-10, a four-engine British-made aircraft. If I remember correctly, we were approaching the coast of Greenland, and there was very heavy turbulance. We hit an airpocket and the VC-10 dropped about 400 feet. Nobody was hurt thankfully, since everybody had their seatbetls fastened, but a few people got a little scared.

The other time, I was on a flight from Portland, OR, to Phoenix, in January of 1997, on an Alaska Airlines MD-92. We were over the Sierra Nevadas, with heavy turbulance. We flew into an air pocket, and the MD-92 dropped close to 800 feet. People who had their drinks and food on their trays, unfortunately ended up losing them. I was sitting in seat A on the portside, and I remember one guy who was sitting in seat F on the starboard side, he had a drink infront of him that ended up in the ceiling of the cabin because of the negative gravity that was generated when the plane hit the air pocket.
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Old 06-05-2009, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
51,816 posts, read 29,888,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyworld View Post
First off I am a really bad flyer anyway and it takes a tranquilizer to get me on a plane. We flew Jet Blue from Boston to Vegas November 2007 and our seats were right over the engine at the exit seats. We noticed that we were flying cross country very low and we noticed the flight attendant was acting strange leaning over people's seats whispering in the other attendant's ear and then getting on the phone to the cockpit.
It turns out the the engine where we were sitting had gone out.

The pilot made an announcement that we had lost the engine and that we would see some emergency apparatus when we ATTEMPTED a landing. This was about 1/2 hour before we were to land and my thought was I hope we don't lose the other one. They told us this was common........HUH???????
Well when we were making our approach I think every single ambulance in Nevada was lining the runway.....we did touch down okay but when we took a doubletake we were being followed by the ambulances fire apparatus and every emergency vehicle available to escort us to the gate.
We sure worried about when it was time to go home. Luckily all was well.
JetBlue uses the Airbus A320 on cross-country flights, and since most modern jetliners have only two engines, pilots are skilled enough to glide them into a landing if both engines are lost. In fact, an Air Transat Airbus A330, which is the same kind of aircraft that was involved in the recent Air France tragedy, the Air Transat A330 was on a flight from Toronto to Lisbon in August of 2001, when both engines were lost at cruise altitude of 39,000 feet over the Atlantic. So the flight crew ended up gliding the jetliner into a military field on the Azores islands. The landing was rough, but thankfuly the crew landed the A330 successfully, with both engines off, in fact the handful of minor injuries that occurred resulted from the evacuation of the aircraft.
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:24 PM
 
11,922 posts, read 21,508,334 times
Reputation: 11694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum Mike View Post
Being compared to the media like that was uncalled for, and yes I know about the descent procedures and slowing down and maintaining airspeed of no more than 250 knots TAS below 10,000 feet.
It's indicated, not true airspeed...

Are you a pilot or do you play one on the forums?
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Old 06-06-2009, 12:25 AM
 
Location: N. Ga
3,694 posts, read 3,286,352 times
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Worst flight for me... Middle of July- American Airlines Flight from Houston to St. Louis with a plane change in Dallas/Ft. Worth. Having landed in Dallas late, having to change terminal, and doing my best OJ running through the airport routine, myself and 5 others made our connection just in time. We took our seats and they immediately shut the door and started backing away from the gate. We got far enough back away from the terminal... and boom... one of our engines quit. We sat for over two hours, in the plane, with no air, having run how many miles, in July... in Dallas. As I sat in my own puddle, I watched Robert Carradines Revenge of the Nerd Character mess around with the engine with a screwdriver for what seemed like an eternity. He finally got the engine working and we proceeded with our flight.

The whole flight, the engine sounded sick. Very often sounding like it might give out at any moment. When we finally came into St. Louis, we did not circle, we did not have a gradual descent. We came down.. straight down.. there was no messing around about it. To this day, I will go out of my way to avoid DFW.
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Old 06-06-2009, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Manila
1,144 posts, read 1,578,948 times
Reputation: 736
The Northwest Flight from Tokyo - Manila back in early January 2007. I thought the plane was actually gonna malfunction because the turbulence was just INSANELY strong, particularly the part where we lifted off from Tokyo...
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