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Old 01-14-2010, 07:56 PM
 
2 posts, read 18,804 times
Reputation: 11

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I'm looking into making a ~700 trip, so I'm thinking it's going to take 11 hours. I'm going from LA (state not Los Angeles) to the Asheville area. Has anyone taken a similar drive? How long did it take? Also is it a hard drive. I just talked to someone who said she drives to VA and she said it's not hard on her.

Anyway, I have to be where I need to be at 12 noon. I really want to skip a hotel to save money and staying there alone. Is driving through the night starting around 9 or 10 pm doable? Without being about to collasp when I get there? How can I keep my energy up and arrive refreshed?

Also- about when is Atlanta's morning rush hour?

Last edited by LAGirl88; 01-14-2010 at 08:06 PM..
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Old 01-14-2010, 08:35 PM
 
13,166 posts, read 20,787,609 times
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I can't help with the drive, but you can expect traffic in the Atlanta area starting as early as 6:30 am, and going until about 9:30, although it will be moving pretty well at either end of these times.
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Old 01-14-2010, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,662,372 times
Reputation: 7720
Louisiana to Asheville: (Depending upon your starting point) I-59 or I-20 to Birmingham; I-20 to Atlanta, I-85 to Spartanburg, SC; I-26 to Asheville. Freeway and 70 mph speed limits all the way. The distance you figured is about right, so 10-12 hours is about right too, depending upon how diligent you are and how easily you get bored. There's not much to see along that route but pine trees.

Advice: Leave a couple of hours earlier. Give yourself a break and a few hours for a nap IF you need one. If you do, DON'T pull into a rest area as they're not safe. Pick a truck stop, park out of the way in the car parking lot and doze off. They might send the law to wake you up, but don't worry about it. It's legal.

Don't try to take a nap before you go. You won't be able to sleep and won't be rested if you do. Just maintain your normal schedule.

Eat a good, high protein supper at your usual time, but don't make it much after 7 pm.

Listen to high energy rock and roll during the daylight hours and, if you have XM, old country late at night.

When you stop for gas, pay inside, not at the pump. Walk briskly and with long strides going in and coming out. Get your blood circulating. If it's cold, leave your jacket in the car.

Don't daydream late at night. Force yourself to stay focused on what you're doing. Find something to look at which isn't stationary or going the same way you are. Play mind games to keep yourself alert. For instance, see if you can identify the type of vehicle coming at you on the other side by their headlight placement. Don't you DARE even think about sleeping! If allow yourself that luxury, you're toast.

Stop as often as needed for coffee to go, but don't overdo it. One cup will help you stay awake; two will put you to sleep because it warms your stomach and that warmth will be carried to the rest of your body.

Roll down the windows for as long as you can stand it. Once you start to warm up, roll them down again. Cold is your friend; heat is your enemy.

Remember that midnight till dawn are the critical hours and and just as it begins to break light in the east is the most dangerous. If you're going to fall asleep at the wheel, that's when it will be.

Antidote? Stop for breakfast about an hour before sunrise. Not fast food, but a well-lit, sit-down restaurant such as a Waffle House or Huddle House (there's almost one at every exit along your route). NO CARBS OF ANY KIND! No sweet rolls, no pancakes, no gravy...just all protein such as breakfast meats, eggs and hash browns (Yes, I know potatoes are carbs, the grease is what you're after). No breads. Linger until the sun is up and let the proteins, sun shine and artificial lighting wake your body up. After that, you're good to go.

And for God's sake...NO SNACKING ENROUTE! Snacks mean digestion. Digestion means body heat. Body heat equals sleep.

Keep the left door closed as much as possible.

You'll do fine.
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta & Savannah, GA - Corpus Christi, TX
4,473 posts, read 7,290,097 times
Reputation: 2217
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
Louisiana to Asheville: (Depending upon your starting point) I-59 or I-20 to Birmingham; I-20 to Atlanta, I-85 to Spartanburg, SC; I-26 to Asheville. Freeway and 70 mph speed limits all the way. The distance you figured is about right, so 10-12 hours is about right too, depending upon how diligent you are and how easily you get bored. There's not much to see along that route but pine trees.

Advice: Leave a couple of hours earlier. Give yourself a break and a few hours for a nap IF you need one. If you do, DON'T pull into a rest area as they're not safe. Pick a truck stop, park out of the way in the car parking lot and doze off. They might send the law to wake you up, but don't worry about it. It's legal.

Don't try to take a nap before you go. You won't be able to sleep and won't be rested if you do. Just maintain your normal schedule.

Eat a good, high protein supper at your usual time, but don't make it much after 7 pm.

Listen to high energy rock and roll during the daylight hours and, if you have XM, old country late at night.

When you stop for gas, pay inside, not at the pump. Walk briskly and with long strides going in and coming out. Get your blood circulating. If it's cold, leave your jacket in the car.

Don't daydream late at night. Force yourself to stay focused on what you're doing. Find something to look at which isn't stationary or going the same way you are. Play mind games to keep yourself alert. For instance, see if you can identify the type of vehicle coming at you on the other side by their headlight placement. Don't you DARE even think about sleeping! If allow yourself that luxury, you're toast.

Stop as often as needed for coffee to go, but don't overdo it. One cup will help you stay awake; two will put you to sleep because it warms your stomach and that warmth will be carried to the rest of your body.

Roll down the windows for as long as you can stand it. Once you start to warm up, roll them down again. Cold is your friend; heat is your enemy.

Remember that midnight till dawn are the critical hours and and just as it begins to break light in the east is the most dangerous. If you're going to fall asleep at the wheel, that's when it will be.

Antidote? Stop for breakfast about an hour before sunrise. Not fast food, but a well-lit, sit-down restaurant such as a Waffle House or Huddle House (there's almost one at every exit along your route). NO CARBS OF ANY KIND! No sweet rolls, no pancakes, no gravy...just all protein such as breakfast meats, eggs and hash browns (Yes, I know potatoes are carbs, the grease is what you're after). No breads. Linger until the sun is up and let the proteins, sun shine and artificial lighting wake your body up. After that, you're good to go.

And for God's sake...NO SNACKING ENROUTE! Snacks mean digestion. Digestion means body heat. Body heat equals sleep.

Keep the left door closed as much as possible.

You'll do fine.
Wow, props to you. You certainly know your stuff!
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Old 01-15-2010, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,662,372 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingImport View Post
Wow, props to you. You certainly know your stuff!

I should! I drove a truck for over 30 years and all-night runs at very high speed were my forte'.
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Old 01-15-2010, 09:49 AM
 
2 posts, read 18,804 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
I should! I drove a truck for over 30 years and all-night runs at very high speed were my forte'.
That's what I thought when I read your post! Now, I have a question about the coffee... I'm not a coffee drinker. Are those 5-hour energy shots okay? I know energy drinks make you crash so I'm staying away from those.
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Old 01-15-2010, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,662,372 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAGirl88 View Post
That's what I thought when I read your post! Now, I have a question about the coffee... I'm not a coffee drinker. Are those 5-hour energy shots okay? I know energy drinks make you crash so I'm staying away from those.

Sorry, but I can't say as I've never used them.

But, colas and regular tea, made from Orange and Orange Pekoe tea, has as much, or more, caffiene than does coffee. So does chocolate. Of course, then you have to deal with the sugar which can be hard on you when the "high" wears off, which won't take long.

If you can drink it, I'd recommend a thermos full of un-sweetened Lipton or Luisianne tea in place of the coffee.
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Old 01-15-2010, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
14,693 posts, read 23,128,863 times
Reputation: 14334
Light cigarettes and keep them in your hand, when the ash burns down to your finger you will get burned and that will wake you up!!!
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,662,372 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by bs13690 View Post
Light cigarettes and keep them in your hand, when the ash burns down to your finger you will get burned and that will wake you up!!!

Yeah, that'll work but it's a little extreme!

And besides, you won't have to do that as you'll most likely get a little drowzy and nearly side-swipe a truck anyhow. That'll give you an adrenaline boost big enough to make it from Atlanta all the way on in!
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Old 01-16-2010, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
6,239 posts, read 15,445,271 times
Reputation: 8108
11 hours is a long time. Although I understand your need to save money, if you really feel that you're getting tired, don't keep driving! Pull off and find a cheap hotel right off the highway.

One time many years ago I flew from Ft. Myers, FL to Reno, NV which took about six hours (one stop in Dallas). Then I drove another nine hours from Reno back to Los Angeles. By the time I got home I was practically hallucinating and it was about 1:00 a.m. Eastern time! How did this happen? I kept thinking, "Oh, I can just go a little bit more. A little longer." Of course, this is how accidents and deaths occur! You push and push yourself until you can't, anymore.

Best of luck; that seems like a very long trek to try to accomplish in one night. Let us know how it goes!
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