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Old 03-10-2010, 06:16 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,164,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Oh good, then it doesn't really apply to current travel. But for the record, I was born in 82.
No, Spain is no problem now. We are heading down again in May and I can't wait.

Oh to be 28 again **sigh**
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Old 03-10-2010, 06:30 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,164,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yankinscotland View Post
I am originally from Michigan and spent the most years there so my accent is basically still a Michigan one with a 'softening and rounding of my O's'. Most of the time I can't tell by accent if someone is Canadian unless they say 'about, out, etc'. My Scottish hub can pick them out every time.

I always wonder why Canadians like to put their flag on their backpacks when they travel. Is that so people don't mistake them for Americans? Or Americans who want to pretend they're not? Or are Canadians so overwhelmingly proud of being Canadian?
We had a discussion about this on the Canada forum last week - it isn't just backpacks when we travel - Canadians just love flags! They stick them on their cars, baby strollers, wheelchairs, backpacks, lapels, chairs, beach towels, and fly them outside their houses, etc. And it isn't just the Canadian flag, you'll see a lot of regional (provincial) flags everywhere as well. Where I come from (New Brunswick) you frequently see a trio of flags (Canadian, New Brunswick and the Acadian) in front yards, businesses, etc.

http://m.travelpn.com/images/moncton...terior_F_1.jpg

chairs http://img2.shoptoit.ca/ss/media/7867000/7867098.jpg (broken link)

I am only starting to realise how flag crazy my country is, living over here where there are so few flags flown! The only other place I have been thus far, that rivals Canada for number of flags flown, would be New England, where so many homes fly the stars and stripes.
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Old 03-10-2010, 06:44 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,989,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
We had a discussion about this on the Canada forum last week - it isn't just backpacks when we travel - Canadians just love flags! They stick them on their cars, baby strollers, wheelchairs, backpacks, lapels, chairs, beach towels, and fly them outside their houses, etc. And it isn't just the Canadian flag, you'll see a lot of regional (provincial) flags everywhere as well. Where I come from (New Brunswick) you frequently see a trio of flags (Canadian, New Brunswick and the Acadian) in front yards, businesses, etc.

http://m.travelpn.com/images/moncton...terior_F_1.jpg

chairs http://img2.shoptoit.ca/ss/media/7867000/7867098.jpg (broken link)

I am only starting to realise how flag crazy my country is, living over here where there are so few flags flown! The only other place I have been thus far, that rivals Canada for number of flags flown, would be New England, where so many homes fly the stars and stripes.
Since 911 the US has flags absolutely everywhere - businesses, cars, mixed in with the xmas lights on the outside of the houses. And they are HUGE flags.

Scots love their St. Andrews flag and I see those often, especially on bumpers. If you see a Union Jack in Scotland the chances are about 99% that the flyer is English.
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Old 03-10-2010, 06:48 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,164,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yankinscotland View Post
Since 911 the US has flags absolutely everywhere - businesses, cars, mixed in with the xmas lights on the outside of the houses. And they are HUGE flags.

Scots love their St. Andrews flag and I see those often, especially on bumpers. If you see a Union Jack in Scotland the chances are about 99% that the flyer is English.
I think the St Andrews flag is beautiful. My husband is Scottish so when we were in Canada I bought one and we flew it alongside our Canadian one in our front yard (garden). (flag fetish flag fetish LOL)
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Old 03-10-2010, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
3,849 posts, read 3,975,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yankinscotland View Post
I had someone almost demand that I explain why Bush was voted in for a 2nd time. She wasn't satisified that I said I had no idea.

It took me a while to get used to people 'taking the pish' out of me and GW gave them extra fuel.

I did decide not to take the US flag decal off the back of my car (was next to the Scottish one). I wasn't going to let that moron make me ashamed to be American. But it was annoying when people began to assume that all Americans must be morons for voting for a moron.
Here, here, me too. Europeans in general are better educated on politics, history, geography, ecology, etc. So they are often passionate about current issues. And American culture is everywhere, TV, movies, food, cars, etc., AND their economies are quite effected by ours, so you can't really blame them for having angst toward Americans.

Despite this, I'm often surprised how Euros don't seem to be aware of the diversity in America. They think New York City is typical America! I tell them to go to middle America and rural areas to find mostly white, Republican voting backward folk who doubt science, hate the government, and just think it'll all take care of itself as long as you don't ask for more taxes.
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Old 03-10-2010, 07:16 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,936,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyMIA View Post
the French but they hate everyone who is not french .
Not true in my many visits there.
If anything, their pride in being French resembles Americans' pride in being Americans.
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankinscotland View Post
Aye! And very funny as well.
Yes! The Scots have a well-developed sense of humor. My appreciation of might be assisted by my Scottish descent. (Love the Saltire, too.)
We once drove for miles and miles east from northwest Scotland.
Each "watch out for the sheep" silhouette sign had been very artistically spray painted to resemble another animal: Rhino, lion, whale, etc. Yes, it was vandalism, but it was so well done, we just had to laugh. ("Watch out for rhinos crossing the road in the Highlands!")
A don't-understand-Brit-English story: Back in 1974, I was rather disconcerted when a pleasant English matron brightly informed me that next week was Humping Day. Later I inferred from the context of the conversation that this lady was telling me that she had been boxing up her household; She was moving next week.
Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I don't care who is president, I will never be ashamed to be American. Presidents come and go, politics change all the time, my citizenship does not.
Yes.

Mintleif, it depends on the time of year, but as Sponger said, I usually wear a lot of boring neutral colors. Black, beige etc. I usually don't travel with jeans--too heavy.
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Old 03-10-2010, 07:56 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Back to NE View Post
Here, here, me too. Europeans in general are better educated on politics, history, geography, ecology, etc. So they are often passionate about current issues. And American culture is everywhere, TV, movies, food, cars, etc., AND their economies are quite effected by ours, so you can't really blame them for having angst toward Americans.

Despite this, I'm often surprised how Euros don't seem to be aware of the diversity in America. They think New York City is typical America! I tell them to go to middle America and rural areas to find mostly white, Republican voting backward folk who doubt science, hate the government, and just think it'll all take care of itself as long as you don't ask for more taxes.
I've heard from many, many people in the UK who said they were so surprised and impressed by the friendliness of Americans on their visits to the US.
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Old 03-10-2010, 08:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BlueWillowPlate View Post
Mintleif, it depends on the time of year, but as Sponger said, I usually wear a lot of boring neutral colors. Black, beige etc. I usually don't travel with jeans--too heavy.
Jeans are not good for travel in Scotland as you're likely to get caught in drizzle or showers. The best trousers/pants I've found are the ones you can get at REI - fast-drying nylon. The ones with lots of safety pockets - zipper/velcro - are great to keeping things you don't want nicked.

Don't wear white trainers (athletic shoes). They'll look mucky often, one of the reasons I think that Scots don't wear all white ones.
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Old 03-10-2010, 08:05 AM
 
604 posts, read 657,499 times
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Don't carry money in your pockets, and when you change your clothes, check your pockets for cut marks. (they're great pick-pocketers)

Try and speak their language, don't just openly speak english like they're supposed to understand, they thin thats rude..(preaching to the choir)

Also, be aware, we think personal space is a foot or 2 between us, I'm not sure what they think, but if they step in REAL close, don't step back, otherwise they'll think its rude...
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Old 03-10-2010, 08:12 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,989,331 times
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Originally Posted by Kings Ranger View Post
Don't carry money in your pockets, and when you change your clothes, check your pockets for cut marks. (they're great pick-pocketers)

Try and speak their language, don't just openly speak english like they're supposed to understand, they thin thats rude..(preaching to the choir)
Wear one of those shirts with a zipper or velcro pocket and put your valuables in their - credit/debit card, passport. Nobody is going to steal anything in a sealed chest pocket.

My experience in France was to at least greet the clerks/waiters in French, then ask if they speak English. Never assume they speak English (they probably do), but they'll pretend they don't if you're rude enough to assume it.
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