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Old 08-22-2012, 03:11 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Nope, Cog Railway, goes striaght up Mount. Washington in New Hampshire.
Pikes Peak in Colorado has one also that goes up to the 14,000+ foot summit.
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Old 08-22-2012, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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I would say CO. I have driven pretty much all the interstates across the country and CO (along with some other areas of the rockies up north) is the only place I have seen serious grades. I laugh at how people can't drive in the "mountains" here out east when driving through PA, MD, WV, KY etc. Getting passed on the right by big trucks etc because they can't go 65mph up a 4% hill. People in the east would get eaten alive driving like that in CO where people drive fast and there are real truck runaway ramps.
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Old 08-22-2012, 03:35 PM
 
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I don't know about grade percentage but one stretch that comes to mind (not sure if it is officially interstate) is Arizona's I-17 climing from roughly 1,000 feet in elevation (Phoenix) to 7,000 (Flagstaff) in about a two-hour drive.
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Old 08-22-2012, 05:55 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dano View Post
I don't know about grade percentage but one stretch that comes to mind (not sure if it is officially interstate) is Arizona's I-17 climing from roughly 1,000 feet in elevation (Phoenix) to 7,000 (Flagstaff) in about a two-hour drive.
That is one of the most amazing drives on an interstate that I've seen. Seeing the transition in topography from high alpine terrain and poderosa pines all the way down to the low desert valleys covered in Saguaro cactuses is amazing. I think one could coast from Flagstaff all the way down to Phoenix.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westcoastvp View Post
It's not an interstate, but US 101 freeway in Ventura County, Ca is a 7% grade and I read somewhere that it's the steepest in California.
I had the misfortune of driving down this incredibly steep grade on Highway 101. I remember feeling instant "vertigo" and I damn near passed out from feeling so light headed. I rode the brake pedal almost the entire way down this twisting, turning, and dangerous slope in a rain storm!

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Old 08-23-2012, 07:32 AM
 
Location: East End of Pittsburgh
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Eastbound I 376 in Pittsburgh (Greentree Hill). The grade is very steep just before the Fort Pitt Tunnel.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:10 AM
 
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The Cajon Pass on the I-15 outside of Victorville, CA. The Cajon Pass connects Los Angeles and San Diego to the rest of the rest of country and Las Vegas. If you want to go Las Vegas from L.A or San Diego you have to use the Cajon Pass, there is no other way. If you are coming from the south or midwest if you take different routes, they all conect to I-15, so the Cajon Pass/Summit is unavoidable. It is a 6% downgrade with is not the steepest, but it last for 12 miles and sometimes there is dense fog so it is like you are driving into an abyss.
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Old 08-23-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clgil77 View Post
The Cajon Pass on the I-15 outside of Victorville, CA. The Cajon Pass connects Los Angeles and San Diego to the rest of the rest of country and Las Vegas. If you want to go Las Vegas from L.A or San Diego you have to use the Cajon Pass, there is no other way. If you are coming from the south or midwest if you take different routes, they all conect to I-15, so the Cajon Pass/Summit is unavoidable. It is a 6% downgrade with is not the steepest, but it last for 12 miles and sometimes there is dense fog so it is like you are driving into an abyss.
If you are going to San Diego from the south you take I8.

Oh, and millions of cars and trucks travel Cajon Pass successfully every year.

Now take a Google look at Tejon Pass (also known as The Grapevine) on I5 leading into and out of Los Angeles.

Last edited by motormaker; 08-23-2012 at 01:43 PM..
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:24 PM
 
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Yeah, but if you want to go to Vegas from San Diego, you have to take the 15. Yes, millions of cars take the Cajon Pass everyday, but I am not one of them. It scared the mess out of me coming from Kansas which is known as the Great Plains. There are hills but they are like bunny slopes. The 8 from San Diego we have done before driving from San Diego to KC, hated it too... too much barren land and longer. If you go from San Diego to KC I would suggest taking the 15 to Interstate 40 (lots of downgrades on I-40 until you get through Albuquerque then it is basically plains/flat from there) to I-35 in Oklahoma Cit and 35 will take you all the way to Kansas City. This way is a quicker route.
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:53 PM
 
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This list isn't limited to Interstate highways--but it's a pretty good summary of the steepest hills/grades in the USA.

10 Toughest Tows In America - Black Mountain - Diesel Power Magazine

Siskiyou Pass is up there for steepest grades on an Interstate in the country. I used to live near I-5 on the ouskirts of Ashland, Oregon at the bottom of the hill from Siskiyou Pass where you could smell and hear the breaks of the 18-wheelers after barrelling down 2,300 feet from the pass in six miles.
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