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Old 04-10-2010, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
28,204 posts, read 47,592,879 times
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BRISTOL, England, April 9 (UPI) -- A retired British couple say they were banned from airplane seats with more legroom for which they paid extra because they were deemed "too old" to sit there.

Marion Webb, 77, and her husband Derek, 79, paid an extra $150 on top of their $3,600 fare for a March 15 flight from Bristol, England, to Egypt on Thomson Airways, the Daily Mail reported Friday.

Couple called 'too old' for airline seats - UPI.com
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Old 04-10-2010, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 82,960,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
BRISTOL, England, April 9 (UPI) -- A retired British couple say they were banned from airplane seats with more legroom for which they paid extra because they were deemed "too old" to sit there.

Marion Webb, 77, and her husband Derek, 79, paid an extra $150 on top of their $3,600 fare for a March 15 flight from Bristol, England, to Egypt on Thomson Airways, the Daily Mail reported Friday.

Couple called 'too old' for airline seats - UPI.com

Adding some more information:

"Bristol International Airport told them they were "too old" for the exit row seats and would be unable to operate the door in an emergency"
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Old 04-10-2010, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Houston, Tx
3,644 posts, read 5,558,544 times
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Yep, I figured that's what it was as soon as I saw the thread title. You have to be able to open those doors in an emergency. I hope they were refunded the extra money at least.
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Old 04-10-2010, 08:41 PM
 
Location: San Diego
5,027 posts, read 13,406,704 times
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Since when does age indicate ability? The way young people today are going, they won't make it to 40! I think it's unfair to discriminate based on age.
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Old 04-10-2010, 09:17 PM
 
14,253 posts, read 23,969,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
BRISTOL, England, April 9 (UPI) -- A retired British couple say they were banned from airplane seats with more legroom for which they paid extra because they were deemed "too old" to sit there.

Marion Webb, 77, and her husband Derek, 79, paid an extra $150 on top of their $3,600 fare for a March 15 flight from Bristol, England, to Egypt on Thomson Airways, the Daily Mail reported Friday.

Couple called 'too old' for airline seats - UPI.com

I think it is a great idea. It is essential that the carrier reserves the right to reseat passengers that it feels are unable to meet the requirements.
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Old 04-11-2010, 08:57 AM
 
32,055 posts, read 32,950,797 times
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I think that someone should have checked their physical ability to see if they met the requirements as there are people at that age level that are more fit than people half their age. If they didn't meet physical requirements then they should have been reseated and given a refund for the difference in fare that they paid.
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Old 04-11-2010, 10:17 AM
 
32,532 posts, read 30,636,834 times
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Airlines often change the seating for various reasons. In this case I'm all for it. In case of emergency I want someone sitting by that door who can pop that sucker open and get us out of there.

(When I fly by myself, as a middle-aged woman, I'm often seated next to children who are flying without a parent or guardian. I've no problem with that. While I realise some people would find this pure torture I've met some great little kids and even been introduced to their parent(s) at the other end. I consider it a win-win. Kid is safe and I've had a little companion.)
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Old 04-11-2010, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,896 posts, read 13,645,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
I think that someone should have checked their physical ability to see if they met the requirements as there are people at that age level that are more fit than people half their age. If they didn't meet physical requirements then they should have been reseated and given a refund for the difference in fare that they paid.
Yeah, because airline staff have time to give passengers a physical test.

The airline aren't saying that no one of that age would be able to operate the emergency door, they're just saying that they don't have time to make exceptions for the ones who could. The couple need to just get over it, it's not personal and the world does not revolve around them and their sensitivities about getting older.

I agree they need to make their policy on it clear though - so passengers know before they buy.
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Old 04-12-2010, 04:24 AM
 
32,055 posts, read 32,950,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Yeah, because airline staff have time to give passengers a physical test.

The airline aren't saying that no one of that age would be able to operate the emergency door, they're just saying that they don't have time to make exceptions for the ones who could. The couple need to just get over it, it's not personal and the world does not revolve around them and their sensitivities about getting older.

I agree they need to make their policy on it clear though - so passengers know before they buy.
I agree that airlines need to make sure the passengers are physically able to operate the emergency door before allowing them to buy such tickets. The way to do that would be to ask the potential passengers a few simply questions about their physical abilities. This would take only a few minutes and isn't that time consuming.
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Old 04-12-2010, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,896 posts, read 13,645,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
The way to do that would be to ask the potential passengers a few simply questions about their physical abilities. This would take only a few minutes and isn't that time consuming.
Sorry but people could lie to avoid embarrassment. They could take the issue too lightly, assuming there wouldn't actually be an emergency so it doesn't matter if they lie and get their extra leg room. I certainly wouldn't want my life hinged on the verbal promise of someone.
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