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Old 11-24-2010, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Arizona
555 posts, read 417,728 times
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Default Washington State good to serial killers

We all know about the Green River serial killer getting only life. There is also a prolific serial killer from Spokane who got only life. This was because the prosecuters asked the families if they wanted a plea bargain so the killers would lead the cops to the victims bodies.

I don't agree with this. The prosecuters act in the public interest, not the interest of the victim's families. The public interest is broader and primary. People who kill dozens of victims deserve the death penalty. Otherwise, Washington state will become a haven for serial killers.

Almost forgot about the Hillside stranglers. The one in LA got life, so the Washington case against his cousin, who claimed to be a multiple personality, wouldn't give him a more serious penalty.
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Old 11-25-2010, 11:37 PM
 
3,586 posts, read 3,907,433 times
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The Spokane Serial Killer, Robert Yates, is on death row. In Spokane he got a plea deal, partly due to (apparently) the prosecutor's wish to avoid a death penalty case, and partly because of what appeArs to be the incompetence of the police who had failed to discover the last missing body (I believe it was a woman called Melody Murphin) which was actually buried in Yates' own back yard, right under his bedroom window. They'd had Yates' house sealed off for weeks, and could have dug through the whole yard, but they didn't... so Yates was able to use that location in his plea deal. He seems to have been under the impression that the deal covered all his WA murders, but the Tacoma prosecutor wasn't in on the deal, so Yates had to stand trial for two Tacoma murders, for which he got the DP.
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Old 11-26-2010, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Arizona
555 posts, read 417,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Fork Fantast View Post
The Spokane Serial Killer, Robert Yates, is on death row. In Spokane he got a plea deal, partly due to (apparently) the prosecutor's wish to avoid a death penalty case, and partly because of what appeArs to be the incompetence of the police who had failed to discover the last missing body (I believe it was a woman called Melody Murphin) which was actually buried in Yates' own back yard, right under his bedroom window. They'd had Yates' house sealed off for weeks, and could have dug through the whole yard, but they didn't... so Yates was able to use that location in his plea deal. He seems to have been under the impression that the deal covered all his WA murders, but the Tacoma prosecutor wasn't in on the deal, so Yates had to stand trial for two Tacoma murders, for which he got the DP.
I somehow missed that. He should be able to claim incompetent counsel if his lawyers didn't tell him the deal didn't cover all his WA murders.
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Old 05-30-2011, 09:38 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodomonte View Post
We all know about the Green River serial killer getting only life. There is also a prolific serial killer from Spokane who got only life. This was because the prosecuters asked the families if they wanted a plea bargain so the killers would lead the cops to the victims bodies.

I don't agree with this. The prosecuters act in the public interest, not the interest of the victim's families. The public interest is broader and primary. People who kill dozens of victims deserve the death penalty. Otherwise, Washington state will become a haven for serial killers.

Almost forgot about the Hillside stranglers. The one in LA got life, so the Washington case against his cousin, who claimed to be a multiple personality, wouldn't give him a more serious penalty.
I don't believe that because as many people have said before deaf is a escape. If ever serail killer got the death penalty then they win. Because that way they don't really have to pay for there crime because they have to suffer they just die quickly and so then they don't have to go to jail where serial killers aren't worshiped they are taken care of in the sence they are hurt were they are not going to be doing bragging but they aren't going to die so then the other inmates can do the same things all over again.
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Old 06-01-2011, 07:10 AM
 
4,705 posts, read 4,052,349 times
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Well, a lot of prosecutors see the clearing of cases being in the public interest, freeing up the police to work on other tasks and giving some closure to the families of the victims. I think they forget, though, that the average serial killer is such an attention-sucking publicity freak that he'll lead the police to more bodies just to keep his name in the paper.

My other two cents is that considering that Death Row costs the taxpayers more than 10x as much as life in prison; considering that putting a guy on Death Row makes him look like a big victim and allows the sob sisters to move in; considering that being on Death Row keeps a prisoner out of the general population where he can be kicked around by his neighbors; considering that when you're dead your problems are over and that I never want the problems of a serial killer to end -- well, considering all that, I am against the death penalty.
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Old 06-01-2011, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Yucaipa, California
8,307 posts, read 9,881,041 times
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An eye for a eye. If you kill someone on purpose then you should be killed as well. You never get closure but you move on in life. Murderers should be executed within 30 days of being found guilty. Its like giving them a 30 day death notice.
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Old 06-02-2011, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Arizona
555 posts, read 417,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post
Well, a lot of prosecutors see the clearing of cases being in the public interest, freeing up the police to work on other tasks and giving some closure to the families of the victims. I think they forget, though, that the average serial killer is such an attention-sucking publicity freak that he'll lead the police to more bodies just to keep his name in the paper.

My other two cents is that considering that Death Row costs the taxpayers more than 10x as much as life in prison; considering that putting a guy on Death Row makes him look like a big victim and allows the sob sisters to move in; considering that being on Death Row keeps a prisoner out of the general population where he can be kicked around by his neighbors; considering that when you're dead your problems are over and that I never want the problems of a serial killer to end -- well, considering all that, I am against the death penalty.
The cops usually believe that even confessed serial killers never tell them the true number of their victims.

Serial killers greatest fear is that they will get the death penalty. If that's the case, then I think we should give them what they fear the most. As their date approaches they will feel some of the terror their victims felt. Or like Ted Bundy, they will have to be dragged kicking and screaming into the death chamber.
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Old 06-04-2011, 05:22 PM
 
3,586 posts, read 3,907,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodomonte View Post
The cops usually believe that even confessed serial killers never tell them the true number of their victims.

Serial killers greatest fear is that they will get the death penalty. If that's the case, then I think we should give them what they fear the most. As their date approaches they will feel some of the terror their victims felt. Or like Ted Bundy, they will have to be dragged kicking and screaming into the death chamber.
They've just found the remains of a young woman who disappeared in 1972 in WA, and there is speculation that she may be another Bundy victim:

Testing confirms identity - Spokesman.com - June 4, 2011

Quote:
The time frame of her disappearance falls close to a string of disappearances in the Northwest later attributed to serial killer Ted Bundy. Myers said it was too early in the investigation to comment on any potential connection.
“We just barely identified her. We don’t have any more than that,” Myers said. His detectives have contacted the Seattle Police Department to obtain details of its investigation into May-Hardy’s disappearance, he said.
Look at her picture--she fits the profile of Bundy's preferred type of victim. Bundy wanted to make deals up until the last minute. He claimed to have been responsible for many more killings than he had been accused of. This poor girl could be one of them--she's been in her grave for 39 years, and now she's going home. But of course it isn't going to matter to Bundy. Would it have been an advantage to the police or the community if Bundy had been serving life, and could be interrogated again? Chances are he wouldn't even remember her. Gary Ridgway (who apparently couldn't have been responsible for this young woman's death) can't even recall all his victims...
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Dublin, CA
3,814 posts, read 1,759,967 times
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I think our laws need to be re-evaluated and re-written. Allow for much quicker and easier deaths of KNOWN killers. The ones without a doubt, did the crime. Richard Alan Davis comes to mind. This should have never been a jury trial and he should be dead already. A case such as this and The Green River Killer, should go before a judge only. Everything heard in one day, the sentence given, then carried out the next day. Why in the hell should Richard Alan Davis still be breathing oxygen? There is NO DOUBT in his guilt.
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Old 06-12-2011, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Earth
11,880 posts, read 12,807,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil306 View Post
I think our laws need to be re-evaluated and re-written. Allow for much quicker and easier deaths of KNOWN killers.
There is such a thing as the US Constitution which you forget about.

However, many serial killers being put into general population (especially rapists and pedos who kill) would be a de facto death penalty - e.g. Jeffrey Dahmer.

I wouldn't mind getting rid of the death penalty and in its place allowing judges discretion to ban protective custody for those who have committed especially heinous crimes.
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