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Old 06-27-2011, 08:32 PM
 
94 posts, read 39,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarmaple View Post
Regarding death row and more particularly women on death row, I continue to fasciliate re: my position -- not so much re: the moral/ethical arena - and presuming that the person is correctly found guilty [meaning she really did it - not a miscarriage of justice] - I guess I need to consider the crime, the horribleness of the crime [degree-wise] - I believe that the more horrible the crime, the less likely that I would agree to death, whether by lethal injection or some other mechanism - I think it is too easy - granted the offender may have filed cazilion appeals because she does not want to be put to death - I would rather see this person in the most restricted, most severe lockup, maybe even 22 out of 24 hours, completely segregated from the general population - give her the opportunity to be haunted forever of the horribleness of her crimes - hmmm, perhaps I being a bit too harsh - but ....
On Florida's death row, the inmates are in single cells for at least 23 hours most days. They are allowed to shower twice a week and they are allowed to go out on the yard two hours twice a week, weather permitting. I assume that the women on sentenced to death live under the same conditions.
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Old 06-27-2011, 08:49 PM
 
94 posts, read 39,102 times
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Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
I agree with the death penalty, but I believe there should be a one year limit on appeals and reviews.

The only problem with the death penalty is that it does not deter crime. One would think it would. There is less crime in countries that have direct consequences of crime, like cutting off a hand for theft. But even that does not deter all theft.

I doubt Casey will be put to death. I do think she deserves it, she shows not one sign of guilt or remorse for her hienous act. Not an apology, and then she drags her family thru the mud. Off with her head!
So I guess many people who have been found to not be guilty, or wrongfully convicted, many years later would have already been executed if there were a one-year time limit for appeals in a death case. You are aware that many people have been found to not be guilty of murder as a result of DNA technology, aren't you?
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Old 06-27-2011, 08:54 PM
 
94 posts, read 39,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogead View Post
I'm opposed to the death penalty on both moral and practical grounds. However, there is a tremendously disproportionate use of the death penalty based upon the gender of the convicted murderer.

When the circumstances of the crime are equal, women are far less likely than men to receive the death penalty or to be executed. This is true even when "aggravating circumstances" would suggest the imposition of the death penalty. In South Carolina, Susan Smith was spared that punishment even though her crime met three such criteria under state law: a multiple murder, the murder of a child, and an especially heinous killing.


Speaking from purely anecdotal observation, it seems to me that the women who do get executed are those who don't fit the conventional image of feminine attractiveness...Cristina Riggs, Aileen Wuornos, etc.


Anthony is trying the same tactic as Smith did. She is suggesting that the responsibility for murdering a defenseless child should somehow be mitigated by the fact that she may have had sexual contact with her father (in Smith's case, it was her step-father) when she was an adolescent.

On a related topic, When a woman and a man jointly engage in violent behavior, the woman is almost always offered an opportunity to reduce or eliminate her sentence by testifying against her male partner. One needs only to look at Canada's most notorious murder trial... that of Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka... top see that practice at work.

I suspect that we are culturally not prepared to accept the notion of a female who is purely evil.
I didn't see the sexual abuse information being used to mitigate the killing. I thought the sexual abuse was being used to explain why Casey lies so much....mitigation for lying.

If she's convicted of murder and then goes to the sentencing trial, I would expect to hear testimony from mental health experts who have examined Casey regarding the sexual abuse and what effect it has had on her.
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Old 06-27-2011, 09:08 PM
 
94 posts, read 39,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
This sort of thing is a commonly held belief among members of the public that have little familiarity with the criminal justice system. Its an impossibility. And, even before the courts became vigilant about the death penalty (1970's) the appeals process took longer than one year.

I am not saying whether or not I approve of this lengthy process. However, this is what the US Supreme Court requires in any death penalty case where the convicted person does not waive his rights.

1. An appeal must be taken to the highest court of the state in which the offender is convicted.

2. The convicted inmate may petition the US Supreme Court to hear the case. Most such petitions are declined.

3. The offender may seek state habeas corpus review of the decision. He does this by filing for a writ of habeas corpus in state trial court.

4. If the writ is denied he has a right to appeal, again, to the highest court in his state.

5. If the highest court in his state denies the writ of habeas corpus, he may petition the US Supreme Court to hear that appeal. Most such petitions are denied.

6. The offender may seek federal habeas corpus review of the conviction. He does this by filing for a writ of habeas corpus in federal district court.

7. The offender may appeal an adverse ruling from the federal district court to the United States Court of Appeals in his judicial circuit.

8. If the US Court of Appeals, denies the writ the offender may petition the US Supreme Court to hear the appeal. Most of the time, this is denied.

9. In a final effort to stop his execution, an offender has the right to ask the state governor (or a board of pardons, if such authority is delegated to it) to grant him clemency and commute the sentence to life imprisonment. This is rare, but occasionally occurs.

10. If all this fails, the offender may be executed.

This process takes a minimum of 8 to 10 years to complete. It is slow and laborious. I used to think it should be changed. I am now of the opinion after having seen a number of cases of innocent inmates who were only reprieved during the last part of this process--federal habeas corpus--that it probably is necessary. It is so long, costly, and stressful for all involved that I think society really needs to consider whether life imprisonment without parole is a better option and whether the death penalty should be abolished. I can virtually guarantee you that cutting steps out of this process will result in innocent people being executed. Is that worth it? Let those who say "yes" answer the question answer a second time if they knew the innocent person being executed was a friend, child, or spouse.
Well said. Thanks for such a detailed post of the process.
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Old 06-27-2011, 09:26 PM
 
94 posts, read 39,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnaNomus View Post
“Baby Lollipops” mother receives death penalty for killing toddler son - Miami-Dade - MiamiHerald.com (http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/06/10/2259223/baby-lollipops-mother-faces-death.html - broken link)

Let me just advise you that this is the most horrible, sickening case of child abuse I ever heard of, and I was absolutely sick after reading about this poor little baby. Lazaro Figueroa was tortured to death over a period of 18 months of his life. At age three, he died weighing only eighteen pounds, covered with bruises and bedsores, a deformed foot and smashed little toes, a broken arm, a fractured skull, a filthy diaper that hadn't been changed in forever and was duct taped on....the list of injuries and atrocities done to this child goes on and on. Already dying from a skull fracture that went untreated and caused his brain to become infected with meningitis, not to mention starving to death, little Lazaro received a final, fatal blow to the head that was so brutal, it disconnected his spinal cord from his brain stem. Still breathing, he was thrown like garbage into the bushes of a lawn and left there to die alone. I can't figure out for the life of me how this three year old baby managed to live as long as he did. He suffered abuse that you don't even want to imagine, I mean so horrible that his death was almost a blessing. And the person who tortured him to death was his own mother.

This happened in 1990, and through legal maneuverings, she is still alive. She was just sentenced to death for the second time this month after her second trial.

In some instances I don't believe in the death penalty. I do think that good people can make bad decisions or get into bad situations, and do something horrible. A lot of murders occur because of drugs, robbery, etc. I do believe that in some instances, once these people get cleaned up and realize what they've done, they are somewhat salvageable.

But anybody that could do this to another human being...I couldn't imagine treating ANYTHING like this child was treated. To be slowly, purposefully tortured to death..I'm not talking about a woman who killed her child in a fit of anger, who momentarily lost control and shook her baby to death, I'm talking about someone who ENJOYED watching her baby suffer. She hated him so much, she resented doing even the most basic things like feeding and changing him, hence the little starved 18 pound body and the duct taped diaper. 18 months of torture...can you imagine how long that was for little Lazaro? This was her own baby. Even if I had passed out and woke up to find somebody else did this to my baby, I couldn't stand there and cry and beg for my own life. I would want to die just knowing that my own little boy suffered like this, and this heartless living piece of crap is standing there crying for own life. It INFURIATES me to no end! If the best thing you ever did for your child was kill him, you don't deserve the air you're breathing.

I just hope and pray it doesn't take another 20 years to give this poor child the justice he deserves.
I am absolutely opposed to the death penalty because death is final and sometimes innocent people are wrongfully convicted. You cannot "undo" the execution of an innocent person.

The Baby Lolipops torture is so horrific that it seems to me that death shoul be the karmic response for what she did. I also believe in redemption, but her redemption in prison just doesn't seem to come close to enough. I've never ever supported the death penalty for anyone, but this one is different. It's just too visceral. I knew that she was going to get a new trial, but I had forgotten about the case altogether in the past few years.
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Old 06-27-2011, 09:32 PM
 
94 posts, read 39,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamofmonterey View Post
I dont think it does. Yes there are punitive and repugnant practices internationally. BUT any woman who can chloroform her infant, i really dont think is rehabilitation material.
I don't know of anyone who thinks in terms of rehabilitation for death row inmates. If someone was wrongly convicted of murder and sentenced to death, it is critical to turn over every rock to find the truth and not execute that person. That is the NUMBER ONE reason to not have a death penalty. One innocent life taken by the state is too much. And as we have all learned through the technology of DNA, there have been a number of people sentenced to death who did not commit the crime.

Life is prison is miserable. The food is awful. The prison controls everything you do. It's awful. Life Without Parole Ever is the way to go. With that, we don't execute innocent people, and the guilty people never get free again. The live in a pretty dirty environment, hot in summer, cold in winter, awful food, rarely ever being have to have a face to face conversation with anyone, always having to watch their backs, rock hard beds to sleep on, and again disgusting food. Prison is a horrible place.
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Old 06-27-2011, 10:03 PM
 
Location: FL
1,716 posts, read 2,626,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fritos View Post
On Florida's death row, the inmates are in single cells for at least 23 hours most days. They are allowed to shower twice a week and they are allowed to go out on the yard two hours twice a week, weather permitting. I assume that the women on sentenced to death live under the same conditions.
I think the men used to be all held at Florida State Prison, but now if they are considered elderly some are housed at Union CI so they can have air conditioning. The women are housed at Lowell and they get AC, I'm pretty sure. I think outsiders in the civilized world take AC and heat for granted but from what I've read about life on the row it's downright miserable with the high temps and humidity in FL and North FL can get sub freezing in the winter.

They are permitted TV's,(no cable) and must be handcuffed except for showers and exercise and are cuffless while in their cell.

From what I've heard convicted DR inmates don't take the standard prison bus ride from jail to prison and go to a reception center then get evaluated and placed in another facility.........they are transported by prop plane in the early morning hours straight to the row.
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Old 06-27-2011, 10:42 PM
 
94 posts, read 39,102 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sgt. Buzzcut View Post
I think the men used to be all held at Florida State Prison, but now if they are considered elderly some are housed at Union CI so they can have air conditioning. The women are housed at Lowell and they get AC, I'm pretty sure. I think outsiders in the civilized world take AC and heat for granted but from what I've read about life on the row it's downright miserable with the high temps and humidity in FL and North FL can get sub freezing in the winter.

They are permitted TV's,(no cable) and must be handcuffed except for showers and exercise and are cuffless while in their cell.

From what I've heard convicted DR inmates don't take the standard prison bus ride from jail to prison and go to a reception center then get evaluated and placed in another facility.........they are transported by prop plane in the early morning hours straight to the row.
That's interesting. True about the temps in North Florida. Deadly in the summer and winter!
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Old 08-02-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,505 posts, read 23,781,794 times
Reputation: 8838
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnaNomus View Post
“Baby Lollipops” mother receives death penalty for killing toddler son - Miami-Dade - MiamiHerald.com (http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/06/10/2259223/baby-lollipops-mother-faces-death.html - broken link)

Let me just advise you that this is the most horrible, sickening case of child abuse I ever heard of, and I was absolutely sick after reading about this poor little baby. Lazaro Figueroa was tortured to death over a period of 18 months of his life. At age three, he died weighing only eighteen pounds, covered with bruises and bedsores, a deformed foot and smashed little toes, a broken arm, a fractured skull, a filthy diaper that hadn't been changed in forever and was duct taped on....the list of injuries and atrocities done to this child goes on and on. Already dying from a skull fracture that went untreated and caused his brain to become infected with meningitis, not to mention starving to death, little Lazaro received a final, fatal blow to the head that was so brutal, it disconnected his spinal cord from his brain stem. Still breathing, he was thrown like garbage into the bushes of a lawn and left there to die alone. I can't figure out for the life of me how this three year old baby managed to live as long as he did. He suffered abuse that you don't even want to imagine, I mean so horrible that his death was almost a blessing. And the person who tortured him to death was his own mother.

This happened in 1990, and through legal maneuverings, she is still alive. She was just sentenced to death for the second time this month after her second trial.

In some instances I don't believe in the death penalty. I do think that good people can make bad decisions or get into bad situations, and do something horrible. A lot of murders occur because of drugs, robbery, etc. I do believe that in some instances, once these people get cleaned up and realize what they've done, they are somewhat salvageable.

But anybody that could do this to another human being...I couldn't imagine treating ANYTHING like this child was treated. To be slowly, purposefully tortured to death..I'm not talking about a woman who killed her child in a fit of anger, who momentarily lost control and shook her baby to death, I'm talking about someone who ENJOYED watching her baby suffer. She hated him so much, she resented doing even the most basic things like feeding and changing him, hence the little starved 18 pound body and the duct taped diaper. 18 months of torture...can you imagine how long that was for little Lazaro? This was her own baby. Even if I had passed out and woke up to find somebody else did this to my baby, I couldn't stand there and cry and beg for my own life. I would want to die just knowing that my own little boy suffered like this, and this heartless living piece of crap is standing there crying for own life. It INFURIATES me to no end! If the best thing you ever did for your child was kill him, you don't deserve the air you're breathing.

I just hope and pray it doesn't take another 20 years to give this poor child the justice he deserves.
That is heartbreaking. I never thought the DP was warranted, but in this case, it is.

Its hard to believe people like that even exist, like that Garrido man who kidnapped Jaycee Dugard. People like that cannot get rehabilitated.
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