U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > True Crime
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-30-2011, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,478 posts, read 21,350,544 times
Reputation: 24359

Advertisements

I read this after work Sunday in the paper, too horrible to even contemplate!

A 10YO Dallas boy who died of dehydration after his father and stepmother kept water from him was being punished for bed-wetting.

Jonathan James died 7/25 after water was kept from him for 5 days while temp's soared to 100 degrees or more. The father and stepmother, both 42, were jailed after being charged Thurs. with injury to a child causing serious bodily injury.

Jonathan's twin brother, Joseph and a 12YO stepbrother were not injured and are staying with relatives.

Joseph told the Dallas Morning News that his parents put Jonathan in a room without air-conditioning and told him to stand by the window. Joseph said that on the day Jonathan died, he had peanut butter stuck in his throat, but his parents wouldn't let him wash it down.

He said he wanted to help but was worried he would also be punished.

Punishment for these parents? Any ideas?

Last edited by tijlover; 08-30-2011 at 09:33 PM.. Reason: edit
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-30-2011, 09:52 PM
 
18,852 posts, read 31,828,372 times
Reputation: 26120
Oh, let them go free...that is what we do with child abusers now...maybe they just need some parenting skills classes...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2011, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,907 posts, read 6,140,251 times
Reputation: 6119
This is such a sad story, as they all are. His twin will never be the same by watching his brother die in such a fashion. What can we do to prevent this kind of thing ? They were required by court order to spend time with the other parent...and the boys were uneasy about going....and no one is answerable for those decisions. It is heartbreaking. My thoughts and prays go out to this family.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2011, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,478 posts, read 21,350,544 times
Reputation: 24359
I've read some horrific true crimes books involving child abuse, and in some cases, the wife/mother was too terrified of the husband, became paralyzed, numb, like a Stockholm Syndrome case. Or it could have been vice versa, husband terrified of the wife.

Perhaps drugs were involved, who knows!

But that poor brother, he will need some intensive counseling or this could impact him the rest of his life. If only......if only......

It's saying the brothers are now staying with relatives. Hadn't they a clue as to what was going on in that house?

The bed-wetting, that alone tells me something, the potential cause of it! Prior physical or sexual abuse?

Last edited by tijlover; 08-30-2011 at 10:28 PM.. Reason: edit
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2011, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,907 posts, read 6,140,251 times
Reputation: 6119
They had been courtordered to visit the biological parent. I guess they lived with relatives before the crime. Sometimes, not always, bedwetting in adolescent boys is not from abuse...may be he only wet the bed at his bio Dads house and that could have been from abuse, I guess. It doesn't say if the bedwetting was an ongoing thing, did it ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2011, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Out West
22,877 posts, read 16,934,377 times
Reputation: 26453
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
I read this after work Sunday in the paper, too horrible to even contemplate!

A 10YO Dallas boy who died of dehydration after his father and stepmother kept water from him was being punished for bed-wetting.

Jonathan James died 7/25 after water was kept from him for 5 days while temp's soared to 100 degrees or more. The father and stepmother, both 42, were jailed after being charged Thurs. with injury to a child causing serious bodily injury.

Jonathan's twin brother, Joseph and a 12YO stepbrother were not injured and are staying with relatives.

Joseph told the Dallas Morning News that his parents put Jonathan in a room without air-conditioning and told him to stand by the window. Joseph said that on the day Jonathan died, he had peanut butter stuck in his throat, but his parents wouldn't let him wash it down.

He said he wanted to help but was worried he would also be punished.

Punishment for these parents? Any ideas?
What the (censored) is wrong with these (censored) (censored) (censored) (censored) piece of (censored) (censored) (CENSORED!!!!!!)

That is UNfrickenreal!

Punishment? Throw them in prison with no a/c, jam peanut butter down their throats, make them stand next to their pathetic little window with bars, give them NOTHING to drink, (empty the toilet bowl as well just in case they get desperate), and let them die the same way they killed their kid.

(Censored) holes!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2011, 11:55 PM
 
9,920 posts, read 9,332,240 times
Reputation: 8063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
What the (censored) is wrong with these (censored) (censored) (censored) (censored) piece of (censored) (censored) (CENSORED!!!!!!)

That is UNfrickenreal!

Punishment? Throw them in prison with no a/c, jam peanut butter down their throats, make them stand next to their pathetic little window with bars, give them NOTHING to drink, (empty the toilet bowl as well just in case they get desperate), and let them die the same way they killed their kid.

(Censored) holes!
This breaks my heart ... our justice system must start dealing out a harsh sentence for people that do horrid things to children. I don't mean 3 years down the road either.

Every week now we are reading about children killed, sexually molested, disappearing or tortured. It has to stop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2011, 07:19 AM
 
9,266 posts, read 9,333,290 times
Reputation: 29099
Quote:
This breaks my heart ... our justice system must start dealing out a harsh sentence for people that do horrid things to children. I don't mean 3 years down the road either.

Every week now we are reading about children killed, sexually molested, disappearing or tortured. It has to stop.
It is heartbreaking. However, as far as harsh punishments go, we have dozens of people in my state serving life or very long prison sentences for killing a child, child sexual abuse, or general child abuse. We have a couple awaiting trial right now who may receive the death penalty for abusing their child to the point where he died. I think the idea that people don't receive harsh punishments for these kinds of crimes is seriously mistaken. People watch endless coverage about the Casey Anthony case and conclude that the whole system has somehow "screwed up".

I think what is more likely is that with the type of news coverage we get these days (hundreds of channels on satellite tv) that you are more likely to hear about something like this when it does happen. In the past, crimes against children occurred. Many times they were never prosecuted because no one saw the parent harm the child. Other times, the body was hidden so effectively it was never found. In some cases, the parents hid the body and moved and communications being primitive, no one in the new community to which they moved had any clue about what they had done.

You want to stop child abuse? You are going to have to be more imaginative and you are going to have accept that some freedoms need to be curtailed. I'll give some examples of what might actually reduce child abuse:

1. We could identify "at risk" families and subject them to regular supervision by state social workers. I'm not talking about just doing it when they come in contact with the system through abuse or neglect. I'm talking about an effort to identify mothers with live-in boyfriends, people with alcohol and drug problems, and children who exhibit signs of being overly sexually aware for their age. The authorities would need the power to enter homes when they felt children were at risk and take whatever steps they felt necessary to prevent abuse.

2. A concerted effort could be made at all public schools to identify all children who have been the victim of abuse. Every year, each child could be questioned by specially trained psychologists and social workers. Parents could be required as a condition of enrollment of their children in school to also submit to an interview in which they would be questioned about everything from the condition of their homes to the forms of discipline they use with their children.

3. We could prohibit some families from moving. One way that many "abusers" fly under the radar is to move every time a social worker or a teacher becomes suspicious of things going on with their children.

4. We could all start to follow Hillary Clinton's admonition about raising children in which she said "it takes a village". We could try harder to observe what is going on in our neighbor's homes. We could offer to sit children in some families when the parents seemed overworked or stressed. We could offer advice and assistance to our neighbors in a non-threatening way when they appear to need it. We could try to restore some sense of "community" in this country.

5. Adequate funding for law enforcement, foster care, and DCFS. (Hint: this means no tax cut this year)

Some of my suggestions here are facetious. Others (like #4, #5) ought to be done. What I'm really trying to do is to make a point. The system can only go so far in preventing injuries and deaths to children. If it goes beyond a point, people would rise up and assert their freedoms are being away. We strike a balance every day between security and liberty.

Where did we ever get the notion that the only way to prevent wrongdoing and harm was through the criminal justice system (by increasing penalties)? Families and society need to stand up and protect their most vulnerable members and not simply dump this job on the police and the courts.

Increased penalties for some offenders may be part of a solution. However, its one small piece and most people never even think about the others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2011, 09:04 AM
 
Location: between three Great Lakes.
1,782 posts, read 1,961,410 times
Reputation: 5984
My solution? RU486 in every Big Mac.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Out West
22,877 posts, read 16,934,377 times
Reputation: 26453
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
It is heartbreaking. However, as far as harsh punishments go, we have dozens of people in my state serving life or very long prison sentences for killing a child, child sexual abuse, or general child abuse. We have a couple awaiting trial right now who may receive the death penalty for abusing their child to the point where he died. I think the idea that people don't receive harsh punishments for these kinds of crimes is seriously mistaken. People watch endless coverage about the Casey Anthony case and conclude that the whole system has somehow "screwed up".

I think what is more likely is that with the type of news coverage we get these days (hundreds of channels on satellite tv) that you are more likely to hear about something like this when it does happen. In the past, crimes against children occurred. Many times they were never prosecuted because no one saw the parent harm the child. Other times, the body was hidden so effectively it was never found. In some cases, the parents hid the body and moved and communications being primitive, no one in the new community to which they moved had any clue about what they had done.

You want to stop child abuse? You are going to have to be more imaginative and you are going to have accept that some freedoms need to be curtailed. I'll give some examples of what might actually reduce child abuse:

1. We could identify "at risk" families and subject them to regular supervision by state social workers. I'm not talking about just doing it when they come in contact with the system through abuse or neglect. I'm talking about an effort to identify mothers with live-in boyfriends, people with alcohol and drug problems, and children who exhibit signs of being overly sexually aware for their age. The authorities would need the power to enter homes when they felt children were at risk and take whatever steps they felt necessary to prevent abuse.

2. A concerted effort could be made at all public schools to identify all children who have been the victim of abuse. Every year, each child could be questioned by specially trained psychologists and social workers. Parents could be required as a condition of enrollment of their children in school to also submit to an interview in which they would be questioned about everything from the condition of their homes to the forms of discipline they use with their children.

3. We could prohibit some families from moving. One way that many "abusers" fly under the radar is to move every time a social worker or a teacher becomes suspicious of things going on with their children.

4. We could all start to follow Hillary Clinton's admonition about raising children in which she said "it takes a village". We could try harder to observe what is going on in our neighbor's homes. We could offer to sit children in some families when the parents seemed overworked or stressed. We could offer advice and assistance to our neighbors in a non-threatening way when they appear to need it. We could try to restore some sense of "community" in this country.

5. Adequate funding for law enforcement, foster care, and DCFS. (Hint: this means no tax cut this year)

Some of my suggestions here are facetious. Others (like #4, #5) ought to be done. What I'm really trying to do is to make a point. The system can only go so far in preventing injuries and deaths to children. If it goes beyond a point, people would rise up and assert their freedoms are being away. We strike a balance every day between security and liberty.

Where did we ever get the notion that the only way to prevent wrongdoing and harm was through the criminal justice system (by increasing penalties)? Families and society need to stand up and protect their most vulnerable members and not simply dump this job on the police and the courts.

Increased penalties for some offenders may be part of a solution. However, its one small piece and most people never even think about the others.
Unfortunately, not all of them get harsh sentences. I know one person only served one year in JAIL, not prison, for severely abusing his child.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > True Crime
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top