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Old 12-29-2011, 07:44 PM
 
455 posts, read 554,684 times
Reputation: 208

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Are people just so naive ? Do they really believe U.S citizens are

more prone too commit criminal acts ? I mean we have more people in prison for considerably longer sentences than anyone, are people really

that hostile towards one and other here !

Last edited by crunchman; 12-29-2011 at 07:46 PM.. Reason: addition
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:48 PM
 
Location: United State of Texas
1,708 posts, read 5,458,903 times
Reputation: 2108
We are soft on crime.

Clevis Watson, 26, charged with drug trafficking. Previous convictions for armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, car theft, and 24 other crimes dating back to when he was 13.

How did this happen?

He was out on the street. Paroled by the parole board in less than three years to have another chance at killing somebody.

I'd call that soft on crime.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:56 PM
 
455 posts, read 554,684 times
Reputation: 208
Seems like a typical product of the system, he's likely unemployable, he needs to earn a living somehow.

No ?
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Old 12-29-2011, 09:02 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,316,662 times
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There may be a difference between being hard on "crime" as a whole, and being largely soft on crime while coming down hard on certain individual criminals.

Being "hard" on crime would involve a comprehensive approach that sought to prevent crime before it even occurred. It would go way beyond playing a game of catch-up with crimes that have already taken place.
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Old 12-30-2011, 09:26 AM
 
455 posts, read 554,684 times
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Well, if you polled Americans probably 75% would say we are soft on crime when the numbers however you slice them show the exact opposite, its just that simple.

We have a love affair with Cops, once they attain a position of power (see the C.C.P.O.A. IN Ca.) in becomes a question of how much legislation they can buy with their campaign donations and p.a.c.'s, couple that with a hysterical media and you have all the trouble you can handle.

I just don't understand what people are so afraid of !!
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:18 PM
 
7,112 posts, read 9,371,507 times
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We manage to be too hard on crime and too soft at the same time. Some people get off easily practically no matter what they do, and others are in the slam for years and years for very minor offenses. And we have so many people behind bars at any given moment that we outstrip every other country in the world, with really reducing the crime rate that much. It's bizarre.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:20 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,752 posts, read 74,750,717 times
Reputation: 48286
Jails are very high vacancy in Iran.
here, we have highest jail population on earth.
There is a reason. No punishment-- just detainment.
Its all part of our philosophy, the endless second chance.
No fault everything.

Last edited by Huckleberry3911948; 12-30-2011 at 02:33 PM..
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:27 PM
 
Location: United State of Texas
1,708 posts, read 5,458,903 times
Reputation: 2108
Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchman View Post
Seems like a typical product of the system, he's likely unemployable, he needs to earn a living somehow.

No ?
No. He should be under a jail.

His armed robbery resulted in an elderly woman being seriously beaten. He also attacked and robbed 2 family members when he was 16. Nobody is forced into a life of crime. Choices made in life should have consequences. I would prefer he was dead.
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Old 12-31-2011, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Arizona
555 posts, read 761,606 times
Reputation: 332
I knew a sociopath, 70 and impotent, who restrained and raped a college student with a foreign object in his motel room. When I read what he did I thought he would get a very long sentence. He got 2 years and 8 months. This in CA.
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Old 12-31-2011, 02:38 PM
 
1,617 posts, read 2,469,157 times
Reputation: 1352
I am not so sure that we are completely soft on crime as we are far more inconsistent w/crimes & punishments -- in part I believe it is about the prosecutors deciding whether they will prosecute a case, or not. Some prosecutors, I have learned, prefer a true 'slam dunk' and if they cannot have that, they will not prosecute - when that happens, I believe it becomes far more of a political issue than a law enforcement / judical issue and to me, when one is elected as that county's state's attorney, they have a moral, ethical and 'position' responsibility to represent their respective State in prosecuting criminals and pursuing those cases. That is precisely why they were elected. I do not believe they should have the right to pick and choose which case will help them look better with a 'sure' win. And that type of action, or inaction, to me, negates the affect that crime had on that victim. And when that happens, it skews the entire judicial system and it is morally repugnant to me.

As a survivor of violent crime and an advocate for victims and their rights, I get so aggravated hearing a victim tell me that their respective prosecutor has opted not to pursue a case or he/she does not believe the case could be won. Is that not for the jury or judge [in a bench trial] to decide? Everyone has their day in court and that certainly includes the victim and/or their families.

My friend's mom was murdered - it was not an act of passion - ultimately the prosecutor who had said he would not plea the case, did plea the case, the offender received 15-to life; the offender served 2 years while waiting to go to trial via cazillion motions, ended up serving 8 years and with "good time served" was released - not even serving the minimum. Why the change? Prosecutor said, just before the trial was to start, "well, maybe it could be viewed as manslaughter instead". Not too much justice for the family, for sure.

I suppose one could say this could be an example of being soft on crime - I view it more as the prosecutor saying maybe not a slam dunk so I don't want to take a chance with a jury.

This should not be about the prosecutor looking good and having wins, this should always and only be about justice being served, in my opinion.
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