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Old 01-17-2013, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,485 posts, read 43,777,962 times
Reputation: 47257

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Don't you think? This employee is partially responsible for the death and serious condition of her son. I think she should be charged but at the very least the family should bring legal action against the county or municipality in charge of the 911 system and the individual operator. We all know every 911 operastor tells folks to stay on the line until help appears. I am seething.
Ark. Woman Dies After 911 Call Not Put in System - ABC News
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:22 AM
 
7,376 posts, read 12,887,222 times
Reputation: 6963
I think it falls under the term gross negliegience but they are still investigating so who knows. Maybe she did enter it into the system and the system malfunctioned.
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Old 01-17-2013, 12:32 PM
 
192 posts, read 297,581 times
Reputation: 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by skel1977 View Post
I think it falls under the term gross negliegience but they are still investigating so who knows. Maybe she did enter it into the system and the system malfunctioned.

'"Proper protocol would be ... we have a one-button transfer switch where you get (the ambulance service) on the line and you remain on the line with them until you're sure that they have handled the call," Martin said.'
If you are supposed to remain on the line she would have known if something went wrong with the system. She did not do her job, and this is not the first time something like this has happened. Ive also heard stories where the police lie and say they are coming and never do, and people get seriously hurt. This was a very time sensitive situation and she should be punished for being careless. Not necessarily charged for murder but she should definitely lose her job. I know I wouldnt want that woman answering the phone if I called and needed help right away.
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Old 01-17-2013, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Northern Illinois
2,187 posts, read 3,616,948 times
Reputation: 6346
Quote:
Originally Posted by michellelasher View Post
'"Proper protocol would be ... we have a one-button transfer switch where you get (the ambulance service) on the line and you remain on the line with them until you're sure that they have handled the call," Martin said.'
If you are supposed to remain on the line she would have known if something went wrong with the system. She did not do her job, and this is not the first time something like this has happened. Ive also heard stories where the police lie and say they are coming and never do, and people get seriously hurt. This was a very time sensitive situation and she should be punished for being careless. Not necessarily charged for murder but she should definitely lose her job. I know I wouldnt want that woman answering the phone if I called and needed help right away.

As a former 911 operator, (I quit voluntarily - newlywed and it was just too stressful). I am here to tell you that at no point in time should you disconnect a 911 caller, unless you are advised by an officer to do so (once they have arrived on scene) or possibly if the caller advises you that it was a mistaken call. You would still send an officer to verify that all was ok at the household in the hang up situation. Once you verify the initial details of the situation, you notify your officers (our agency did not dispatch the fire department/medics but they monitored our traffic and knew what we were dealing with - and their dispatcher then also dispatched one of their units to the scene) and give them location, situation, and any other info you may have that they need (ie. weapons, violent subjects, shots fired, etc. depending on the situation). I always kept my caller on the line, not only to reassure them that someone was on the way, but to talk to them, calm them, ask pertinent information, try and distract them if necessary, just to give them a calm and reassuring voice and know that someone was enroute to help them.) and also to update my responding officers of changing situations they needed to be aware of. Many times, in a domestic situation, 911 line would ring, you would hear the phone hit the floor, the line was open and then you heard the subject (usually female) being punched and beaten, and being cursed, threatened, and screaming. Those calls were the worst for me, those and suicidal subjects. Keep in mind that every agency, both police and fire, have procedures and protocols in place for virtually every situation. You can't train for everything but common sense does come into play at times. This operator in my opinion failed her caller and I am sure she will be questioned and investigated repeatedly. She should lose her job, and the city and possibly she herself will probably be sued for negligence. It is totally uncalled for. Even in small agencies where you are the only dispatcher on duty (as I was most of the time - on midnight shift) you learn to prioritize and know that you are accountable not only by the community, but your officers and your agency. Do your job properly - or get out of the chair. Lives depend on you.
Also, the phone calls are taped, and the CAD system will show all of the calls received via the 911 lines. If she tries to lie and say she never received the call - there is direct proof that she did. It is on tape. All of her conversation (both sides of it) is there for the listening. There was no system malfunction - how convenient if there were - just at this particular time? That can also be verified. I hope and pray that the agency and this employee have the integrity to admit the wrongdoing and make it right. If the community has no faith in your ability to protect them, you can only imagine how that will play out in the long term.

Last edited by CFoulke; 01-17-2013 at 01:19 PM.. Reason: addition...
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Old 01-17-2013, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,485 posts, read 43,777,962 times
Reputation: 47257
always good to hear from an insider. But if you watch enough TV shows you learn the 911 operator ALWAYS tell the caller to stay on the line until the call is then handed over to police or ambulance.
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Old 01-19-2013, 02:14 PM
 
7,112 posts, read 9,349,377 times
Reputation: 8162
They may still be sorting out WHOSE mistake, if anyone's, led to the death.
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