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Old 04-29-2013, 08:02 AM
 
5 posts, read 8,529 times
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Hey everyone!

So I have a final paper due and needed help finding resources or maybe just point of views from people here. Here is the questions:

What are we doing as a State to address the consequences of incarceration or a criminal history on an individual's ability to secure employment and housing?

and


What can we do more of to assist those returning to communities from incarceration to reduce the likelihood of them returning to jail or prison?

 
Old 04-29-2013, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
1,031 posts, read 2,111,816 times
Reputation: 730
http://www.nationalreentryresourcece...gs=Connecticut This link should help you with recent developments in Connecticut regarding reentry into the community following incarceration.

I personally believe more volunteers are needed to act as brothers/sisters to people who are leaving prison. Lots of people end up in jail for drug abuse/sale, theft, and robbery. Many of these people could break out of the "gangster" mindset by having influential figures in their lives showing them what they could accomplish by choosing a new path. A friend of mine works for CT Junior Republic and is a saint for the work she is doing. Violent criminals probably need extensive psychological help and meds which should be paid through Medicaid.
 
Old 04-29-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,234 posts, read 7,263,107 times
Reputation: 6700
Quote:
Originally Posted by theor23 View Post
Hey everyone!

So I have a final paper due and needed help finding resources or maybe just point of views from people here. Here is the questions:

What are we doing as a State to address the consequences of incarceration or a criminal history on an individual's ability to secure employment and housing?

and


What can we do more of to assist those returning to communities from incarceration to reduce the likelihood of them returning to jail or prison?
I worked as a Corrections officer in the State Penitentiary at Lincoln, Nebraska for ten years. In my opinion one of the biggest problems with inmates is the high rate of illiteracy. There is NO REASON to lock up an inmate and turn him back on the streets UNLESS that inmate has made an attempt to improve during his incarceration. Not all inmates are illiterate and in fact many inmates I observed were highly intelligent and some had advanced degrees in various fields. Why not use the educated inmates to teach the illiterate inmates various skills. . . the most basic being reading and writing?

Give these people some JOB SKILLS that they can use other than illegal methods to earn a living.

GL2
 
Old 04-29-2013, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,730 posts, read 23,155,761 times
Reputation: 5844
To help the OP even further, the Mods might want to move this to the True Crime forum. There, they can compare what CT is doing to other areas of the nation.
 
Old 05-05-2013, 12:03 PM
 
1,617 posts, read 2,465,118 times
Reputation: 1352
Good questions.
In support of gunluvver2's comments - I think if there are inmates who do not have a high school education/diploma and/or illiterate, it should be a mandatory requirement to at least obtain a GED. I think that should be part of their sentencing requirements automatically.

Further, depending upon the sentencing time, in addition to the mandatory high school diploma, and perhaps thinking more about it, it should be a diploma rather than the GED - I say this only because I think there is still a negative concept [for whatever reasons' concerning the term GED as opposed to a high school education. For those inmates who are sentenced for an extended period of time, I think it should also be mandatory to either earn college credits and/or a skilled trade -- if someone is incarcerated for two years - then that would be the equivalent of earning an associate's degree - four years = a bachelor's degree -- for those that prefer a skilled trade, that too should be mandatory.... i.e., electrician - apprentice, journeyman, etc.

Further for those inmates who have anger issues, whether they are incarcerated because of a domestic, aggravated assault - whatever it is, it should be mandatory to attend and participate in an intense anger management therapy group with accountability and/or a batterer's intervention program [many states not only have BIP programs, but they are also being certified programs.

I think it should be mandatory to take what could be called a Life 101 course which include such things as: parenting skills, learning how to manage finances, including checking accounts, how to change a tire, and time management skills.

I also think one of the most important things to mandate is something in the arts -- I think there are many people, especially those who are incarcerated who truly have 'stuff' to deal with [actually we all have 'stuff' to deal with - smile] and many cannot express those feelings and/or are angry about them, or ashamed, etc. and by being able to have creative opportunities, like art, music it is an outlet.

I get it [smile] that this is prison; however, if we do not want to have a continual revolving door to jail cells, all inmates need to have the ability to acquire these skills and to master many of them.

Unless someone is a sociopath or has a serious mental illness [not to be confused with an emotional disorder] whereas nothing will change a sociopath and someone with mental illness may well need long-term medication, I believe that giving an inmate the opportunity to do some, complete it and begin to recognize the value and worth of their accomplishments, only then will there be a lessening of return incarceration.

I also understand that there are exceptions to every situation -- basis and additional education should be mandatory. I cannot even imagine not being able to read or write.

There was an inmate in my area - a woman - who murdered someone - [the circumstances for this posting are irrelevant] during her incarceration she began to write -- her writing skills apparently became more and more impressive and she ended up being able to be in a unique program after several years of her incarceration she ended up having a few articles published in a locale paper. For her it was a form of constructive therapy and it made a difference with her attitude and her new found outlook on life.
 
Old 05-05-2013, 01:00 PM
 
1,617 posts, read 2,465,118 times
Reputation: 1352
Ironically, was reading [on-line] the local news, and came across this story:

How Vt. inmates are helping families of fallen war heroes - WCAX.COM Local Vermont News, Weather and Sports-

Parts of this reiterate both comments I made and others.
 
Old 05-05-2013, 07:41 PM
 
18,852 posts, read 31,698,893 times
Reputation: 26111
Not true crime. Thread closed.
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