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Unread 10-09-2013, 03:32 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
14,858 posts, read 12,756,174 times
Reputation: 13330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bludy-L View Post
Yes....you may give permission to release it, but a funeral director can't do that without permission.

Ever wonder why you can't call a hospital and ask what someone died from?

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No, because I know why. You and I are talking past each other right now. Reread the absolute "never" you said awhile ago.
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Unread 10-09-2013, 03:44 PM
 
2,040 posts, read 522,623 times
Reputation: 981
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
No, because I know why. You and I are talking past each other right now. Reread the absolute "never" you said awhile ago.
Perhaps because the 5 newspapers I deal with won't print a cause of death for fear of being sued AND because as a funeral director in my State the State Board instructs us yearly in our continuing education that HIPPA Rules apply to funeral homes.

Of course however, just as when you sign a HIPPA form at your doctor's office, you may waive it under specified circumstances. It's still not a state-by-state thing.

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Unread 10-09-2013, 04:13 PM
 
2,040 posts, read 522,623 times
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I am not sure where the OP got any information that a death certificate had not been filed.

The process is:

1) The attending physician signs the death certificate if someone dies while under a doctor's care. If you die unexpectedly and are not being treated for something, then a coroner gets involved.

2) In order to get a permit to bury or cremate, either a doctor or coroner must sign the death certificate.

3) A pending death certificate may be filed to get a burial or cremation permit if the cause is under investigation or if the doctor cannot physically sign immediately (on vacation, etc). Normally, a coroner will allow cremation or burial (on a pending certificate) once he's satisfied that a cause can be determined either from lab results and/or autopsy findings.


Therefore, if Clancy is buried or cremated already (or soon to be) then a death certificate has indeed been "filed" (either final or pending) in order to have the permit issued.

By the way....cremations cannot take place for at least 24 hours even with a final certificate just to give someone time to question the cause. And, all cremations require a 2nd "cremation authorization" from the coroner on top of the burial/cremation permit.

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Unread 10-09-2013, 04:23 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
14,858 posts, read 12,756,174 times
Reputation: 13330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bludy-L View Post
I am not sure where the OP got any information that a death certificate had not been filed.

The process is:

1) The attending physician signs the death certificate if someone dies while under a doctor's care. If you die unexpectedly and are not being treated for something, then a coroner gets involved.

2) In order to get a permit to bury or cremate, either a doctor or coroner must sign the death certificate.

3) A pending death certificate may be filed to get a burial or cremation permit if the cause is under investigation or if the doctor cannot physically sign immediately (on vacation, etc). Normally, a coroner will allow cremation or burial (on a pending certificate) once he's satisfied that a cause can be determined either from lab results and/or autopsy findings.


Therefore, if Clancy is buried or cremated already (or soon to be) then a death certificate has indeed been "filed" (either final or pending) in order to have the permit issued.

By the way....cremations cannot take place for at least 24 hours even with a final certificate just to give someone time to question the cause. And, all cremations require a 2nd "cremation authorization" from the coroner on top of the burial/cremation permit.

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Probably because he interpreted "a cause of death has not yet been released" statements in the press releases with "no certificate of death" being issued.

Or "it's a conspiracy".
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Unread 10-09-2013, 04:49 PM
 
2,040 posts, read 522,623 times
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BTW.....HIPPA Rule is so strict that should someone die of a communicable disease, the hospital isn't even permitted to warn the funeral home that they are receiving such a body!

We are supposed to treat everyone as if they have a communicable disease instead.

This of course places us in danger and makes the cost of services increase.



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Unread 10-11-2013, 08:15 AM
 
3,948 posts, read 2,791,350 times
Reputation: 10296
Quote:
BTW.....HIPPA Rule is so strict that should someone die of a communicable disease, the hospital isn't even permitted to warn the funeral home that they are receiving such a body!

We are supposed to treat everyone as if they have a communicable disease instead.

This of course places us in danger and makes the cost of services increase.


Your mistaken. The following is taken from the HHS Commentary on HIPAA rules and the need to respect privacy when it comes to medical records.

A public health exception has been carved out. There is a specific section of the rule that allows health care providers to disclose this information for public health reasons and to prevent the spread of infectious disease.

Summary of the HIPAA Privacy Rule

[See the section that states permitted uses and activities, and look up public interest and benefit activities, Section 5]

I don't particularly care for HIPAA. My legal practice is primarily a personal injury practice and I deal literally daily with health care providers in attempts to extract medical records and bills from them. They are constantly objecting to the Release that I use (no matter how it is written). Agencies like Medicare seem to spend more time worrying about complying with HIPAA than they do collecting reimbursement or subrogation for the millions of dollars they spend to help treat injured accident victims who are receiving Medicare. My staff and I spend hours trying to get medical records when twenty years ago, I spent about fifteen minutes trying to get the same records. No one is benefiting from huge privacy restrictions that make it difficult for me to get the records of an individual who broke his leg in a car accident. Ninety-nine percent of people don't feel that such information raises a privacy issue.

Mental health records and drug treatment records are a "different animal" and I understand some of the concerns about releasing these. HIPAA, though, doesn't really keep anyone from getting these records. It just makes everyone spend more time perfecting a fancy medical release form that covers every base.

In my opinion, HIPAA is one of the worst laws ever written.
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Unread 10-11-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: the Outer Limits
3,705 posts, read 2,340,931 times
Reputation: 3399
Here in my county in Central Fl, the cause of death is always listed in the obit, the non listing being the exception. Now, that may be voluntary, as someone said, by the family and I guess that is so.

I don't care what Clancy died of. He's dead and that satisfies any curiousity I might have. Now if it was a relative, I wouldn't mind knowing.

Quote:
..jukesgrrl..Here's a question to ponder re: Clancy's many books (the ones he wrote and the ones his publisher put his name on that he didn't write). Were they just accidentally perennial favorites of people who look for conspiracies around every corner or are there so many people who look for conspiracies around every corner because so many people read Clancy's books (as well as Dan Brown, Steve Berry, Scott Mariani, John Grisham, Jeffrey Archer, Vince Flynn, et al.?
Is this post being ignored because there is no basis to the statements or it is to far out......? Did he not write some of his books ?
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Unread 10-11-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
14,858 posts, read 12,756,174 times
Reputation: 13330
Tom Clancy, bestselling Calvert County author, dies at 66 -- SoMdNews.com

The local obit finally.
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Unread 10-11-2013, 02:39 PM
 
27,828 posts, read 15,543,246 times
Reputation: 13377
It's amazing how a whole thread can spawn out of someone claiming that some aspect might be "abnormal" when really it isn't.

We have a whole bunch of people looking for anything to turn into a conspiracy, even the death of a 66yo man that previously fought cancer.
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Unread 10-14-2013, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Yellow Brick Road
34,048 posts, read 38,135,142 times
Reputation: 16962
Wooooa--I never claimed that something was abnormal! It was not typical. Big difference.

Look up any bio on any random "famous personality" and typically, there will be at least some mention of the person's cause of death.

I also mentioned that the fact that a cause of death had not been mentioned seemed to have spawned some conspiracy theories, but I also stated that I felt folks were just looking for something to write about -- creating news rather than reporting the news.

And I never said that funeral directors released the cause of death! I was referring to how funeral homes would drop off the info about deaths every day, with obit info. Often, that info did include something about cause of death, but it might be something indirect. However, that decision to refer to cause of death would have been given by the family. Sometimes, folks would want "after a lingering illness" or "after a sudden illness" included in the obit. In addition, family would often want a foundation, church, organization, etc. to be mentioned in case folks wanted to make a donation in memory of the deceased and this would often at least imply the cause of death, i.e., Cancer Society. I never said that funeral directors released the cause of death.

I have since read that Clancy had dealt with cancer earlier, so it would stand to reason he likely died of some type of cancer.
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