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Old 10-05-2013, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Yellow Brick Road
35,342 posts, read 42,215,632 times
Reputation: 19445
Default Tom Clancy--why has death certificate not been filed

Tom Clancy died this week, but no cause of death was given. I have continued to search daily and the latest info I could find stated he died at Johns Hopkins -- but no death certificate had been issued.

I find this unusual, or at least - not typical.

Why would there be no death cert issued/filed?

I know regs vary from state-to-state in re: to such matters, but in all states, a death certificate is public information.

If there are questions, i.e. "suspicious death," . . . then of course - there is an autopsy. I suppose lab reports, such as toxicology and pathology reports, could be holding things up.

However, in the case of a suspicious death, I would think the DA makes a decision at that time to pursue a course of action and this would be public info, too. For example, if there were suspicion that someone was murdered in the hospital by an employee . . . there would be an investigation opened. Or if there was no immediate cause of death but homicide were suspected, then an investigation would be opened.

Am I way off here? Does this seem at least atypical that someone would die and nothing be mentioned about cause of death and in addition, nothing mentioned if this were a "suspicious" death or a suicide?

Last edited by anifani821; 10-05-2013 at 07:58 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:15 AM
 
18,868 posts, read 14,942,728 times
Reputation: 24843
It really depends. The DA can only press charges based on police investigation, and sometimes, it can take awhile for facts to get sorted out. It depends on where a person died, circumstances, and if others in the family are pressing for an investigation, when it all looks fine.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Muskogee OK USA
4,903 posts, read 2,609,240 times
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I notice the internet is abuzz with silly theories.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:30 AM
 
3,464 posts, read 2,756,985 times
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I seem to recall that it took quite awhile to get my father's death certificate. It came from the state and is along the lines of getting a vehicle title from the state, etc. They take their sweet time! (One state says 5 days to 12 weeks for this to be processed.)

Then one time a friend of mine died and I called the medical examiner to ask what he died of. They asked if I was family and I said no. Then they said that information could only be provided to the family. Also that no autopsy was done. (I've since learned that many times autopsies are only required if foul play is suspected and other times may rarely be done.)

Anyway there is a big difference between what is shown on TV and real life - seems these things are "secret" (unless you are family)!
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Old 10-05-2013, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Forty Fort
4,072 posts, read 3,009,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_J View Post
I seem to recall that it took quite awhile to get my father's death certificate. It came from the state and is along the lines of getting a vehicle title from the state, etc. They take their sweet time! (One state says 5 days to 12 weeks for this to be processed.)

Then one time a friend of mine died and I called the medical examiner to ask what he died of. They asked if I was family and I said no. Then they said that information could only be provided to the family. Also that no autopsy was done. (I've since learned that many times autopsies are only required if foul play is suspected and other times may rarely be done.)

Anyway there is a big difference between what is shown on TV and real life - seems these things are "secret" (unless you are family)!
Not "secret", just NOYB. There are HIPAA regulations now, and medical personnel must be extremely cautious about who gets what information.

My personal experience with death certificates is relative to my Mother and the late hubs - the funeral home had the death certificates within days and gave us several copies.
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Old 10-05-2013, 06:03 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
16,649 posts, read 15,638,179 times
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Clancy had suffered a bout of cancer (I forget of what) a few years ago. The people here who know (and note where exactly I am, roughly 12 miles from his house here) are saying a recurrence of that.

I probably could make a call and find out precisely but I don't give enough of a **** about him to do so.
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Old 10-05-2013, 06:34 PM
 
4,411 posts, read 3,463,063 times
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Tom Clancy died this week, but no cause of death was given. I have continued to search daily and the latest info I could find stated he died at Johns Hopkins -- but no death certificate had been issued.

Quote:
I find this unusual, or at least - not typical.

Why would there be no death cert issued/filed?

I know regs vary from state-to-state in re: to such matters, but in all states, a death certificate is public information.

If there are questions, i.e. "suspicious death," . . . then of course - there is an autopsy. I suppose lab reports, such as toxicology and pathology reports, could be holding things up.

However, in the case of a suspicious death, I would think the DA makes a decision at that time to pursue a course of action and this would be public info, too. For example, if there were suspicion that someone was murdered in the hospital by an employee . . . there would be an investigation opened. Or if there was no immediate cause of death but homicide were suspected, then an investigation would be opened.

Am I way off here? Does this seem at least atypical that someone would die and nothing be mentioned about cause of death and in addition, nothing mentioned if this were a "suspicious" death or a suicide?
In my experience, its not unusual. When Dad died four years ago, I waited about a week to get a death certificate. There was no autopsy. No suspicious cause of death. He died in his bed in his home of terminal cancer. His hospice physician had barely been retained and that was the reason for the delay in issuing a death certificate.

I guess anything is possible. I wouldn't assume based on what you've said that there is anything suspicious at all.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:18 PM
 
1,721 posts, read 3,186,166 times
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I see many death certificates that state the cause of death is "pending".

I would say in this case they're not going to release it because he is famous. Plus, it will state where he will be buried/interred, and the family doesn't want the press showing up.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:24 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
16,649 posts, read 15,638,179 times
Reputation: 15831
Quote:
Originally Posted by artemis View Post
I see many death certificates that state the cause of death is "pending".

I would say in this case they're not going to release it because he is famous. Plus, it will state where he will be buried/interred, and the family doesn't want the press showing up.
Very little press, except for the locals, will show up, he wasn't that famous. The family situation is complicated, there's an ex-wife and their kids and the multitudinous relatives on that side who live here. Then there's the new wife. To say that the divorce was strained would be a vast understatement.
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Old 10-05-2013, 09:01 PM
Status: "Don't worry, be happy..." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
27,913 posts, read 20,426,780 times
Reputation: 75285
In our experience in our family with normal deaths it took from 2-4 weeks before the death certificates were sent to us.
If a death is under suspicious circumstances the certificate delay can be a long time until signed off by the medical examiner and recorded.
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