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Old 02-11-2011, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
135 posts, read 323,403 times
Reputation: 169

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I think it's a fair assessment from Saltwater's point of view. Can an opinion be wrong??

However, it has been a while since he/she lived here and I can honestly say that Downtown Tucson has gotten better - Meet Me at Maynards has taken off, and now there's Second Saturday Nights (which I haven't been to yet.)

And yes, the summer can be brutal but one thing I love about it is that you can really enjoy the nights - no jackets or long pants required! I love lounging around with friends by the pool - day or night. By the time you get really sick of summer, the monsoon kicks in and cools things off a bit. I've hiked all over Southern Arizona, too, and where else can you find such a variety of desert terrain and mountain ranges? (Although there are some areas to be avoided because of illegal immigrant traffic, but that's a topic for another thread).

I moved here thinking I'd stay just three years and it's been 11 and counting ...
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Old 02-11-2011, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
461 posts, read 817,826 times
Reputation: 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by CH14 View Post
MDCB- You've been at the debate now for a while with these 2 cities. Having lived in both, and you have probably found, each cities residents are loyal to their home. If I recall- you have visited both. Go with your gut. These boards offer a wide spectrum of views and I wouldn't depend on some stranger's opinion to help you decide. Both have great benefits of living there- you just need to decide what is important in the next 3 yrs. I assume as a resident your free time will be limited...keep that mind. Portland has MUCH to offer- but are you going to be able take advantage of that as much as you would like to?
Thanks CH14. I [i]have [/I ]been in debate. I have one more week to choose where I want to head!!!

I do appreciate the wide spectrum of views though...I am not depending on strangers perspectives, but every new view does count and it gives me new variables to think about. I like having these options but sometimes they are overwhelming.

I have been to Tucson 2 or 3 times in the past. However, I was hanging out with one of my friends down there who isn't the most motivated/rich person in town. We are good friends, but share different lifestyles. He lives in a "filthy" apartment per my standards and I live in too clean of one per his. I had a great time hanging out with him and visiting his friends, but I know my living conditions and people I hang out with will be different (my friend is shy and very picky...whereas I am very open minded and willing to talk to anyone). That is why it helps to have another perspective

I will be a resident and yes, I will be very busy. However, this doesn't mean I will be working every single second like the stereotype. For example, I will probably have 1 day off every week for about 7 months. I have 1 month of vacation, and 4 months where I will have every weekend off. So perhaps I can use those weekends to take advantage of Portland? I will also be studying quite a bit too...
My normal schedule will probably look something like this:
5:30 AM-5:00 PM WORK
5-630 Gym/tennis/soccer/golf
7-bedtime (10/11) Dinner, reading up on pts., and relaxation.
ONE DAY OFF

Is this enough time to enjoy the features of Portland?
It will be very very busy, but I think it is all about how you make time...what is important, etc.


Quote:
Originally Posted by swbell6 View Post
I think it's a fair assessment from Saltwater's point of view. Can an opinion be wrong??

However, it has been a while since he/she lived here and I can honestly say that Downtown Tucson has gotten better - Meet Me at Maynards has taken off, and now there's Second Saturday Nights (which I haven't been to yet.)

And yes, the summer can be brutal but one thing I love about it is that you can really enjoy the nights - no jackets or long pants required! I love lounging around with friends by the pool - day or night. By the time you get really sick of summer, the monsoon kicks in and cools things off a bit. I've hiked all over Southern Arizona, too, and where else can you find such a variety of desert terrain and mountain ranges? (Although there are some areas to be avoided because of illegal immigrant traffic, but that's a topic for another thread).

I moved here thinking I'd stay just three years and it's been 11 and counting ...
I really appreciate your perspective swbell6! A 3 year planner like me, now 11 years eh? Nicely done!

I just saw the MMM website...very neat idea. Second Saturday Nights eh? Every city has one of these and they are all very fun. Those things sound like a lot of fun.

A few more questions about Tucson:

- You said by the time you are sick of summer the monsoon kicks in...I thought the Monsoons were a July and August phenomenon. People are sick of the summer by then? LOL

- Southern Arizona hiking? Could you point me towards a few website for good hikes? And when do you usually go hiking in Tucson/surrounding areas? What about in the summers? Wait til the sun sets? The last time I was in Tucson we went to Sabino Canyon and then saw some hikers coming in when we were leaving. It was night time and they all had helmets and lights...what gives? Bat watching?

- I am currently doing a rotation in Louisville, KY and my parents live here. I really like this city. It helps that I have lots of friends to go do things with, but the city has a lot of things going on. A part of town for the young clubbers, Bardstown rd. with a little older, artsy, unique scene, different dive bars, older neighborhoods, good art scene downtown, etc. If anyone has been to a city like Louisville/Cincinnati/etc. is Tucson somewhat comparable in offerings? or is that more PDX territory?

- What other major offerings are there? I have already decided to pursue golf and learn a bit of Spanish if I move down there. Are there art classes? I saw on yelp that there are some amazing yoga classes.

- I would really like to live somewhere "sophisticated." I don't mind paying a few extra hundred bucks a month to have nice appliances, central A/C, and liberal yet classy neighbors. I really would like to avoid the bland apartment offerings and would like a 1-2 bdrm house. Is this possible at all if I want to live between UMC and VA hospitals? I was thinking West University, Dunbar Springs, El Presidio, Iron Horse, Rincon Heights, Mountain/1st Ave, Northwest Tucson, etc. Could I find a nice place in those neighborhoods? I am willing to pay about 800 with all utilities.

Thanks again for all the information. This really does help me make a decision. Just think about how annoyed my friends must be. I bug them all the time about helping me make a decision!
Thanks again. I really appreciate it. If there was some way I could send those who have been helping me a candy bar/valentines gift, I would. Everyone has been very nice!
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Old 02-11-2011, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Oro Valley AZ.
1,024 posts, read 2,587,923 times
Reputation: 1191
[quote=MDCB;17753453]I
What hospitals do you guys go to when you get sick? Where are your older relatives usually admitted? Are there some really nice private practices in Tucson?[

/quote]

For any emergency situation, when possible, go to UMC. Elderly with possible stroke, after stabliized, go to UMC, infant, go to UMC, only level three NICU in town I beleive. childrens emergency, go to UMC " if possible". Case in point, several years ago my mother was admitted on an emergency basis to a hospital in NW Tucson, it took 36 hours for her to be seen by a neurologist. A year later a repeat episode, mother went to NW Hospital, once stabilized, we requested a transfer to UMC. At UMC was seen immediately by Neuro docs. Had neuro docs available 24/7. For elective surgeries the other hsopitals are fine and I have used them. For a routine birth, NW Womens Center is fantastic. etc. (just there this week, new grandson!) But in general for emergecy stuff UMC is the best bet.


[quote=MDCB;17753453]I
I just found that Northwest Medical Center seems ritzy and nice[
/quote]
Think you must be referring to the NW Hospital/Medical Center in Oro Valley. Don't think most people would call the original NW Hospital "ritzy". It's nice, but not ritzy.
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:20 AM
 
Location: Tucson, Arizona
339 posts, read 787,202 times
Reputation: 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDCB View Post
Sorry. Didn't mean to come off as argumentative. I am just saying that every hospital you walk into will have awards plastered all over the walls. You have to be careful in saying what a hospital is good for. I am almost convince that I want to train here and am ready to make plans to move to Tucson!

Individual clinical skills are what count as mentioned above. You guys are correct...but the teachers are important. I am glad that we have some good staff being filled into UMC.
I am nervous about being an intern, but excited to move to Tucson. I will not be working at any of the private hospitals around Tucson except for TMC.

I am looking forward to days that look like this:



And not like this:



These pics are from webcams at the same time...lol. A lot nicer in Tucson than in OH.
Though, I am curious, do people get sick of the sun all the time? I would like some cloud cover from time to time...say 10% of the time?

I have also learned that wherever one is, it really depends on the people one interacts with/makes friends with that really help living anywhere. I could still be in the miserable midwest weather as I have friends and familiarity here. However, I wanted a new challenge, a new start, and I feel like I am about the right age and right time in my life to pursue it.
I just wanted some pep talking/reassurance in the "making friends" realm. I will be moving down there with no social support system. I have never lived in a different city than my parents before. I am hoping I will meet some interesting people at work. If not, I might be out of luck as I will be spending a lot of time at work.
Tucsonians usually up for new friendships? I hope to meet other new transplants. Do you guys meet a lot of transplants around town? Strong local scene?
I will be at the hospitals, probably join a gym, somewhat open to meetup.com or other websites (never done it before), and also will be playing some sports.

I hope all the sunshine and nice weather will power me up like superman. Moving to Tucson becomes a reality more and more every day. I am sure I will have more questions. Thanks for putting up with my annoying posts.
Oh you will definatly love it here! I did the same thing, wanted a change and to get out on my own try something new, meet new people and the people in Tucson are very friendly and nice and the weather is beautiful, the scenery is beautiful, and the mountains are beautiful. You will not regret it and will want to stay.
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Old 02-14-2011, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
135 posts, read 323,403 times
Reputation: 169
MDCB - Real summer usually kicks in around mid-May. It'll be hot through mid-October, but the monsoon in July and August is a welcome relief. June is the hottest and probably driest month. My first monsoon, back in 2000, I was shocked when co-workers ran outside to dance in the rain. Now I get it.

There are tons of hiking clubs in the area - meetup.com is your best resource for this. Most of the meetup clubs are free and there are multiple hikes offered almost every day. I highly recommend that you hike with experienced people and always bring lots of water, even if you think you don't need much. I've seen people run out and it ain't pretty. Also, for low-elevation hikes, plan to be finished hiking and back to your house or car by 9:30 or 10 at the very latest in the summer. (And off the mountains by 1 or 2 p.m. during the monsoon - lightning is very likely in the afternoons.)

Also, I'm not a fan of night hiking in the desert - too many rattlesnakes. The last night hike I did, we saw probably a dozen. That was enough for me. But I bring a head lamp or flashlight on almost every long hike, just in case we run out of daylight. There's a really good book that lists local hikes and has info about what to expect - just google Betty Leavengood and you'll find it.

Also, as far as culture and sophistication, keep in mind that Tucson is a university town, so of course you will find plenty of people who enjoy reading, taking classes and expanding their horizons.

Be sure that, if you live downtown - say, Armory Park or Iron Horse - that you can live with noisy trains day and night. (I do like the West University area.) You'll find tons of listings on craigslist, of course, but it's hard to judge quality and location on that site, especially if you're from out of town. Two-bedroom apartments should run about $600-$675, including water and trash, and depending on condition and location.

Phew - didn't mean to write a book. Good luck with your move and let us know what you decide.
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Old 02-15-2011, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
461 posts, read 817,826 times
Reputation: 225
MDCB - Real summer usually kicks in around mid-May. It'll be hot through mid-October, but the monsoon in July and August is a welcome relief. June is the hottest and probably driest month. My first monsoon, back in 2000, I was shocked when co-workers ran outside to dance in the rain. Now I get it.

Thanks for all the help!!
Ok I guess I will be able to handle the summer and be refreshed by the monsoons. I will be moving in June...the peak!! And I will start working around July.

There are tons of hiking clubs in the area - meetup.com is your best resource for this. Most of the meetup clubs are free and there are multiple hikes offered almost every day. I highly recommend that you hike with experienced people and always bring lots of water, even if you think you don't need much. I've seen people run out and it ain't pretty. Also, for low-elevation hikes, plan to be finished hiking and back to your house or car by 9:30 or 10 at the very latest in the summer. (And off the mountains by 1 or 2 p.m. during the monsoon - lightning is very likely in the afternoons.)

I really plan to invest in a water carrying device...a bottle...sack..flasks...or maybe a bladder.I am not too sure that I will be hiking in the hot hot sun...sounds pretty miserable. I guess I will have to get up early or go out late and fight the rattlesnakes...ha! I would much much rather hike in nice lush forests though....I hope to like the desert if I move down there.

Can you say that the desert/desert hiking is an acquired taste?


Also, I'm not a fan of night hiking in the desert - too many rattlesnakes. The last night hike I did, we saw probably a dozen. That was enough for me. But I bring a head lamp or flashlight on almost every long hike, just in case we run out of daylight. There's a really good book that lists local hikes and has info about what to expect - just google Betty Leavengood and you'll find it.

Also, as far as culture and sophistication, keep in mind that Tucson is a university town, so of course you will find plenty of people who enjoy reading, taking classes and expanding their horizons.

It really is a university town...or at least that is what it sounds like. I wanted a little more sophistication/bigger city attitude, but I guess I will have to sacrifice that for my career.
PDX has a pro basketball team, a better restaurant scene, and art scene.
Not that I will have time to enjoy all these things as a medical resident, but it does bring different types of people into the community that one can meet.

Be sure that, if you live downtown - say, Armory Park or Iron Horse - that you can live with noisy trains day and night. (I do like the West University area.) You'll find tons of listings on craigslist, of course, but it's hard to judge quality and location on that site, especially if you're from out of town. Two-bedroom apartments should run about $600-$675, including water and trash, and depending on condition and location.

I saw the train tracks on google maps. I was going to consult with my friend who already lives there. I would be ok with just a one bedroom apt...but like I said, I would like some nice amenities, a pool, and perhaps a porch. A house would be a lot nicer than an apt.

Phew - didn't mean to write a book. Good luck with your move and let us know what you decide.

No worries! I really appreciate the information! As I mentioned, I am leaning towards TUS, but also have a big draw towards PDX. PDX I feel like is a much nicer city with better amenities and a more educated populace. But TUS offers better career goals for me. And I hope to enjoy the populace (patient and friends) here in TUS for the next 3 years!
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Old 02-18-2011, 04:56 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
461 posts, read 817,826 times
Reputation: 225
Default Incredible article

If only more Tucson citizens had this thought process!!!!
Beyond the Solar Zone: Making Tucson the Solar Capitol of the US - Tucson Progressive

I think the article is eye opening! How can no one else see that Tucson can be completely free of polluting energy????

I just think Tucson is FULL of potential when it comes to (free) solar energy! The solar energy map just lights up Tucson like crazy! If we could attract some big companies to invest....that would be great.
It would be interesting to talk to the owners of Sky Bar and the pizza joint to figure out what their business numbers are like...investing in the panels vs. cost saved.

However, I digress. I just would be much much more willing to move to Tucson if they were a little more progressive in areas like Solar power (not that PDX is). It has a great university where I am sure excellent solar research is taking place, but we need a lot more.
PDX seems a little more progressive and green. They seem to recycle a lot. LOL

I saw a recent article that was linked from the Portland forum: OPB News · History Hinders Diversification Of Portland, Ore. (http://news.opb.org/article/63201-history_hinders_diversification_of_portland_ore/ - broken link) It even mentions that Intel workers were down for going to Portland over the bay area (though the Bay area has its own problems).

I know the weather is a HUGE thing I will have to get used to in Tucson but what else? BTW What is the consensus on winter weather in Tucson? Extremely cold in the mornings with pleasant day time temps? How does that make one feel? Crappy to get up? But nice when it warms up only to be pissed that it cools off incredibly at night?

-I have already started thinking about humidifiers and house plants to keep an oasis (my house) in the desert.

-As far as people...I am a people person....I will be working in the hospital, and will meet lots of people. I have established friends in town and therefore will not suffer from that angle.

-I need an upgrade to my closet....so will be doing some clothes shopping in Tucson. It seems like they have everything I would be able to afford. PDX seems to have better/high class shopping?

-Is there a farmers market in Tucson????

Thanks again! T-3 days to decide!

Last edited by MDCB; 02-18-2011 at 05:11 AM..
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Old 02-18-2011, 02:12 PM
 
2,942 posts, read 6,153,881 times
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Well, solar energy is not "free" it is quite expensive right now (like all technologies, the price will come down with time). There is also the problem of what happens when the sun doesn't shine and the wind doesn't blow (for wind farms). I think solar's "day" will come, but when you need the government to pay for half of it so that the consumer will break even on costs, it's not the time... yet.
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Old 02-18-2011, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Southern Arizona
9,541 posts, read 29,717,221 times
Reputation: 11504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchie_az View Post
Well, solar energy is not "free" it is quite expensive right now (like all technologies, the price will come down with time). There is also the problem of what happens when the sun doesn't shine and the wind doesn't blow (for wind farms). I think solar's "day" will come, but when you need the government to pay for half of it so that the consumer will break even on costs, it's not the time... yet.
Very valid point, Ritchie.

I have had two estimates to convert to Solar Power and both final prices were enough to knock my socks off. For a small (1400 plus sq ft) home it would take me about 15 years to recover the initial investment without any allowances for maintenance down the road.

I would convert in a heartbeat once the price drops to a more acceptable amount.
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Old 02-18-2011, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Oro Valley AZ.
1,024 posts, read 2,587,923 times
Reputation: 1191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bummer View Post
Very valid point, Ritchie.

I have had two estimates to convert to Solar Power and both final prices were enough to knock my socks off. For a small (1400 plus sq ft) home it would take me about 15 years to recover the initial investment without any allowances for maintenance down the road.

I would convert in a heartbeat once the price drops to a more acceptable amount.
Out in Marana, Trico Electric is developing what they call a "Solar Farm". My understanding is they are building this massive Solar Farm right by the Trico Coop on Tangerines Road, then they are selling "shares" of each panel, then one is reimbursed on their monthly electric bill based on energy generated. An interesting concept, don't know how the numbers will shake out, but like you said Bummer, it usually take quite a while to recoup your investment. But what this solar farm does is allow you to participate in solar without having it installed on your roof. An interesting concept.

In Oro Valley the they are just about finished installing solar panels in the parking lot of the library, city hall area at La Canada and Naranja. 1300 solar panels that covers all the parking spaces, so the panels serve a dual purpose, provides shaded parking and generates electricity. Once again don't know how the numbers will work out long term, but seems like a nice idea. Oro Valley Solar Panels

Last edited by RickTucsonHomes; 02-18-2011 at 04:15 PM..
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