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Old 12-13-2011, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
132 posts, read 145,054 times
Reputation: 153
I think Tucson is very livable by bike or bus. You can load your bike onto the front of the bus (for instance, if it's dark when you leave work) and one transfer is free if you ask for it when boarding.

Tucson has several major bike paths - Rillito along the north edge of the city limits; the Santa Cruz along the west; and Mountain Avenue which runs north-south to the UA area. Plus there are bike lanes along Glenn, Treat, Third Street, etc., where there isn't as much traffic to deal with.

Try to find a rental near your job, a supermarket and drug store. That will be most of your trips, I'm guessing. I see a lot of people in my north-central neighborhood toting groceries in one of those basket carriers on wheels. I buy some of my weekly groceries while on my bike and stuff everything into a backpack. Just try not to buy orange juice, milk and heavy cans all in the same trip. Learned that the hard way ...
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Old 12-22-2011, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Hell
192 posts, read 293,935 times
Reputation: 129
Tucson IS a biking town, Greater Arizona Bicycling Association, Tucson, Arizona - Knowledge Base Library . I ride the Sun Tran bus fairly regularly going to work. I own a vehicle but the traffic in Tucson especially during rush hour is HORRIBLE so I ride the bus. Tucson doesn't have a crosstown freeway so the main roads are quite packed. Tucson isn't New York so don't expect a bus ride if you work graveyard shift at a corner edge in Tucson.

As for employment, it's not the best at the moment (unless it's a restaurant job). You'd be better off finding work at that giant neighbor called Phoenix . Yes, you can find $400-$500 apts in Tucson for 1 bdrm.

I would suggest live/work close to the center in Tucson ... you'd be better serve with a $400-$500 apt with no vehicle ... riding bus or biking during the day.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:37 PM
 
11 posts, read 11,000 times
Reputation: 12
if you work on or near one of the major bus lines tucson is very easy to get around on a bus. For example two of the main routes on broadway and speedway run evey 10 or 15 minutes. Shopping can be difficult without a vehicle but there are a lot of rent a car specials which you can find online especially for Enterprise or hertz where you can get a car for the entire weekend under $40. i do this all the time and even doing it twice a month makes shopping easy and still far cheaper than car costs and insurance.
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Old 01-13-2012, 06:36 PM
 
434 posts, read 127,828 times
Reputation: 153
Would it be worth my time to come to Tucson and try to find a job after I get there?
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Old 01-27-2012, 01:39 PM
 
1 posts, read 831 times
Reputation: 10
Anyone who claims Tucson is a bike-friendly town either hasn't been to a TRULY bike-friendly town or is working for the board of tourism. I feel like I'm taking my life (and my kids' lives, since they come along) at risk every time I ride outside of anything but the least busy streets. Here's an example: How am I supposed to navigate one of the major intersections? Hell, those are risky enough in a CAR, let alone a bike. I end of having to use the pedestrian crosswalk, and even then it's obvious drivers don't see me until very late.

And the bike trails?? I haven't found one yet that's not blocked due to construction. The worst part is they don't give you a heads-up until you're right on top of them. The only option then is to turn around or get creative (again, not a great situation with kids in tow.)

And then there are bike lanes that disappear, re-appear, then disappear again.

Here's how you can tell Tucson's not a biking town: My family went for a ride the other day with my wife hauling the twins in the trailer and me with my son's trail-a-bike hooked up. People looked at us like we were a sideshow attraction (and a couple even made comments about how great it was that we were all biking together.) In a true biking town, nobody would have batted an eye.

Now if you want to claim the surrounding area (National Parks, Mount Lemmon, etc) are bike-friendly, you have a good argument. But Tucson itself? Laughable.
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Old 01-27-2012, 03:10 PM
 
Location: outer space
484 posts, read 432,029 times
Reputation: 383
^wrong
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Old 01-27-2012, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Oro Valley AZ.
936 posts, read 1,217,926 times
Reputation: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasterday View Post
Anyone who claims Tucson is a bike-friendly town either hasn't been to a TRULY bike-friendly town or is working for the board of tourism. I feel like I'm taking my life (and my kids' lives, since they come along) at risk every time I ride outside of anything but the least busy streets. Here's an example: How am I supposed to navigate one of the major intersections? Hell, those are risky enough in a CAR, let alone a bike. I end of having to use the pedestrian crosswalk, and even then it's obvious drivers don't see me until very late.

And the bike trails?? I haven't found one yet that's not blocked due to construction. The worst part is they don't give you a heads-up until you're right on top of them. The only option then is to turn around or get creative (again, not a great situation with kids in tow.)

And then there are bike lanes that disappear, re-appear, then disappear again.

Here's how you can tell Tucson's not a biking town: My family went for a ride the other day with my wife hauling the twins in the trailer and me with my son's trail-a-bike hooked up. People looked at us like we were a sideshow attraction (and a couple even made comments about how great it was that we were all biking together.) In a true biking town, nobody would have batted an eye.

Now if you want to claim the surrounding area (National Parks, Mount Lemmon, etc) are bike-friendly, you have a good argument. But Tucson itself? Laughable.

America's 50 Best Cities for Cycling
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Old 01-27-2012, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Prescott, AZ
1,591 posts, read 1,992,087 times
Reputation: 770
I lived in Tucson in the 90s when I first retired. You can get around on a bike depending on your needs and where you live compared to where you work.
Tucson is a spread out town and it's around 10 miles or so from one end to another.
Do you want to bike in 100° WX? How about driving rain with hail during the summer monsoons as they like to call them here?
I did not like getting caught in the rain/hail there on my MC either! Hail hurts at speed!
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Old 01-27-2012, 05:46 PM
 
Location: outer space
484 posts, read 432,029 times
Reputation: 383
Sure, I wouldn't go riding east on Grant approaching Swan where the bike lane disappears, but then again, I wouldn't even ride on Grant. There are many safe routes to any part of town. They sometimes are not direct routes and you need to find these on your own or follow one of the many, many people on bikes around town.
Personally, if there is no hail, I love riding in the rain!
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Old 01-29-2012, 05:57 PM
 
6 posts, read 5,576 times
Reputation: 25
Default Well, you can . . .

Tom Danehy, in his popular weekly column for the Tucson Weekly (Jan 26-Feb 1, 2012 issue) : “I don’t know how or why anybody rides a bike on the streets of Tucson. It’s insane. The simple, ugly truth is that you could get dead in the blink of an eye, and it almost certainly wouldn’t be your fault. . . . The reason is simple: Tucson has an unusually high concentration of jackass drivers.”

There are other reasons, too, why riding a bike in Tucson is dangerous. If you are behind a truck carrying stones, you could easily get struck by one (the windshield replacement industry flourishes in Tucson). If you don’t get hit by one, you could easily ride over some – most streets here are littered with stones – causing your bike to slide sideways out of control. And drivers here are indeed dangerous and getting more so – a few blocks from my home in Continental Ranch (a part of Marana, just outside Tucson, and generally less crowded and safer), a woman was killed on her bicycle. I might note that it wasn’t widely reported, for the media here don’t like to report bicycle accidents (the Tucson Weekly is an alternative paper) because the city likes to advertise itself as bicycle friendly. Believe me, with such friends, you don’t need enemies.

So, can you ride your bike in Tucson? Well, you can, it’s not illegal, but as Danehy says, you will be taking your life in your hands – or, rather, putting it in the hands of some jackass driving an SUV with one hand on a Big Slurp and the other holding his cell phone.

Last edited by George666; 01-29-2012 at 06:04 PM.. Reason: formatting
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