U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Tucson
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-19-2013, 06:31 PM
 
68 posts, read 163,896 times
Reputation: 38

Advertisements

How is it during July and August when the rains come? It sounds like they come in quickly - how do you deal with that when driving home from work, etc. (I'm from CT - moving to Tucson. We get heavy rains but we had good drainage so it's not too bad in most areas here). Please describe what it's like. Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-19-2013, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Tucson
205 posts, read 616,950 times
Reputation: 376
Yes, they come in quickly but most people know which roads flood and which ones don't and adjust their routes accordingly. Because it's the desert, flooding happens and then goes away as quickly as it started. It doesn't make financial sense to build massive storm water management systems to handle two months worth of water. What surprises me is that there isn't more private capturing of runoff via cisterns and such. Even though July/August are the big rain months, it does rain infrequently the rest of the year and every bit of fresh water helps. When you see the arroyos fill literally within minutes, it's very impressive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Marana, AZ
66 posts, read 127,210 times
Reputation: 107
I moved here from CT .... and I can tell you it's nothing like New England storms. They are just magnificent to watch. They come and go quickly and can be pretty dramatic. You can see them coming (or building) and just don't plan on driving when they are happening. They usually don't last long - so you are better off just hanging out where you are until they pass. The flash floods disappear as quickly as they came (unlike NE flooding).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2013, 10:27 PM
 
67 posts, read 192,404 times
Reputation: 59
To me, people really try to make a big deal out of monsoons. I've lived here for four years now and never have been *caught* in one to the point where I feel in danger.

We live on the North side of town and I'd swear that they're in different places each year. One area might got hit harder one year, then the next it is somewhere else.

I've seen much worse storms in Houston (where I'm from)-- we actually had to pull off the highway there a few times due to no visibility.

As for floods-- rule of thumb-- don't cross running water on a road. Up here, they leave the "do not enter" signs out on the side of the road in low areas and move them out if needed.

I could be wrong-- but most of the monsoons are June and July. August is just hot, hot, hot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2013, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Tucson
12 posts, read 18,985 times
Reputation: 14
The monsoon typically starts in the first week of July (could start earlier) and lasts through August and sometimes September. Technically, the rains don't "come in" the way that you would expect with an eastern cold front. In the SW, thunderclouds will build over the mountain peaks, aided by rising air. These storms can grow to cover the entire Tucson valley or, depending on the circumstances, remain over the mountains.

The moisture comes in from the south, with winds around 10,000 feet bringing in water from the atmosphere above the Sea of Cortez and the eastern Pacific. I forecasted weather for this region for a while. There are also lots of statistics you can look up on the National Weather Service website (e.g. Last year we received 4.13 inches of rain in July.)

I have personally been caught in zero-visibility rainfall while driving and survived, but year-to-year there are reports of individuals being trapped in flash floods. When I moved here I was shown a series of videos of cars being dragged away by less than 6 inches of flowing water. The big thing to beware would be getting caught in a sandstorm going north on I-10 toward PHX. That would be bad...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2013, 01:59 AM
 
Location: 38N 105W
4,723 posts, read 7,030,380 times
Reputation: 7297
We had the monsoon rains in Colorado, too, but not as beautifully dramatic as here in Tucson. The "official" monsoon season is June 15 - September 15, but typically the monsoons are mid-July to late August, sometimes into September. They are huge thunderstorms with lots of lightning and torrential rainfall. Because the ground is so hard and dry, the water just runs over the ground without soaking in, causing massive runoffs and flooding. But, as quickly as the storms appear, they just as quickly disappear. We can have a monsoon storm at 1:00 p.m. and by 4:00 p.m., the streets and river beds are dry again. They are beautiful, but dangerous storms, so if you don't have to go anywhere during them, don't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Arizona
3,595 posts, read 941,874 times
Reputation: 804
If I recall, Summer 2006 was the last time we had really super intense monsoon storms. Also, when I first moved here in the mid-90s, it seemed like they were more intense then they are now. And some years the monsoon seems like a real bust.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2013, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Colorado - Oh, yeah!
833 posts, read 1,435,273 times
Reputation: 1032
Quote:
Originally Posted by tumamoc View Post
If I recall, Summer 2006 was the last time we had really super intense monsoon storms. Also, when I first moved here in the mid-90s, it seemed like they were more intense then they are now. And some years the monsoon seems like a real bust.
I'd have to agree with you. I came here in 94 and the first couple of years the monsoon was incredible. The last few (10+) years have had some decent storms, but the monsoon as a whole has been lacking.

The clouds build up later and seem to have a different flow to them. I am not saying the total rainfall hasn't been good in some of those years, but the storms themselves are not the same.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,515,355 times
Reputation: 29030
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsBreeder View Post
... We live on the North side of town and I'd swear that they're in different places each year. One area might got hit harder one year, then the next it is somewhere else ...
It doesn't even have to be one section of town or another. I live 1.75 miles slightly uphill from the Foothills Mall and often it is pouring rain there while we have not a drop. Two summers ago I drove to the Walmart on La Cholla Blvd. in the middle of the afternoon to find it closed. Walmart! A guy in the parking lot told me they had evacuated because the rain was so bad the parking lot was flooding. I was in the parking lot (only 15 minutes later according to him) and it was barely wet and I had not seen a drop of rain on my short trip there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tumamoc View Post
If I recall, Summer 2006 was the last time we had really super intense monsoon storms. Also, when I first moved here in the mid-90s, it seemed like they were more intense then they are now. And some years the monsoon seems like a real bust.
In the eight years I've lived here, I've only seen a significant amount of water in the Canada del Oro wash one time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2013, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Arizona
3,595 posts, read 941,874 times
Reputation: 804
This video nicely illustrates the sheer power of all that rainwater. The Rillito, normally a bone dry river bed:


Tucson Rillito River Flooding 7-31-06 - YouTube
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Tucson
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:19 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top