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Old 09-14-2017, 05:37 AM
 
7,843 posts, read 11,143,137 times
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Its only going to get worse as the whole problem is Big Hollywood is migrating to Netflix and Amazon. All the original content there will start to look just like whats on network tv only with more swear words. Shonda Rimes is just the beginning.
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Old 09-14-2017, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
21,029 posts, read 15,237,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielAvery View Post
Starting the new fall seasons in mid-September was problematic for decades, since the momentum of new shows would get interrupted by the baseball playoffs, then the World Series, combined with the beginning of football season for NFL and colleges. Once every four years there would also be election coverage cutting into the new premieres. I recall some shows (especially new ones trying to "make a splash") being pre-empted to the point that viewers didn't see the show regularly to form a habit of tuning in.

I am in that generation that looked forward to that extra-thick "Fall Preview" edition of TV Guide in mid-September, where the magazine would publish a full-page photo and article giving the premise/stars of every new show. They took pains not to sound pessimistic about any of the shows they profiled, no matter how ridiculous the shows sounded. That edition of the magazine was often the first I'd heard of these new shows in the pre-internet era, so it was highly anticipated.
Exactly the situation I was thinking about.
With so much competition from other avenues, it makes little sense to start anything that is going to be repeatedly preempted for other (live) programming.
Of course, that doesn't help with network retention since people likely just start watching on netflix, etc., and don't come back to the "regular" channels.

That being said, it looks like there are some shows returning before the beginning of October (just barely), at least according to TVLine.com:

"Yes, it is time for our famously handy calendar (and it is an actual calendar) of season and series launches, taking flight with Fox’s The Orville and the return of Outlander before going absolutely bonkers the week of Sept. 25, where nearly 60 (!) premieres await you."

Fall TV Premiere Dates 2017
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Old 11-24-2017, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,895 posts, read 8,873,507 times
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As if to further prove my original point, the television season this year mostly started in late September or early October. Now, just 2 months later, we're getting (mostly) crappy holiday programs and reruns (already), and new episodes of series won't be back until January.

So, I signed up for Netflix, and I'm really enjoying it.

Network television is just cutting its own throat.
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Old 11-25-2017, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,455 posts, read 633,009 times
Reputation: 1998
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I remember when the new fall season started shortly after Labor Day. Now I notice that many of the new and returning shows are beginning in October...a month later.

This -- and many other actions -- by networks is exactly why network television viewing continues to decline. They're their own worst enemies.
Shorter seasons might have something to do with production costs per episode has skyrocketed due to high prices for the actors, producers, directors and writers, plus permits and licenses for sets, etc......

I myself will find me losing interest in a show due to poor quality writing, or something in the script that ticked me off. Last show on broadcast TV I have watched from beginning to end, fully invested in, would have been NBC's Third Watch. Heck, the last good show I loved was 24, and I just could not get into the new version of it because Keifer made that show what it was.
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Old 11-25-2017, 09:00 AM
 
878 posts, read 245,596 times
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Forget about prime time TV, have you seen the programming at all other times? Yes daytime televisions has always been mindless trash marketed towards degenerates and the unmotivated. But now local tv news is rebroadcast on six different stations throughout the day. Infomercials. Half the channels almost are Spanish- and all trash, informercials, and recycled news as well. Then there are a handful of independent stations showing six straight hours of "Murder She Wrote" and shows such as "Empty Nest", that were only moderately successful to begin with and more than 20 years ago. Quit wishing primetime network TV would be better- it isn't going to and it is a microcosm of a bigger problem; the end is nearing.
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Old 11-25-2017, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,420 posts, read 3,547,315 times
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Ads and the time ads last on tv, are more frequent now. Pro football now showing ads split screen with playing field between plays...





[/b]
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I remember when the new fall season started shortly after Labor Day. Now I notice that many of the new and returning shows are beginning in October...a month later.

This -- and many other actions -- by networks is exactly why network television viewing continues to decline. They're their own worst enemies.
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Old 11-25-2017, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Phoenix-Valley of the Sun
2,461 posts, read 1,203,437 times
Reputation: 3047
Let's see:

Actors getting paid more, way more, for less content

more and more commercials. IIRC, commercials were a lot less in the 90's then they were today

netflix has taken over with NO commercials and you can stream when you want. However, if you're trying to stream network tv online, you have to pay for it or already be a cable subscriber.....

For example, I use to watch the Big Bang religously. However, ever since I got rid of cable/satelite, I haven't watched that show in two years. It doesn't stream on netflix/hulu, and if you want to watch it online, you have to pay money.....to watch something FREE on television...
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Old 11-25-2017, 09:46 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
6,521 posts, read 3,792,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Ads and the time ads last on tv, are more frequent now. Pro football now showing ads split screen with playing field between plays...





[/b]
Way more ads is right.

Seems like sometimes 10 ads in a row.

As for shortened seasons, less episodes...started back in the mid 60s.

Shows would typically do over 30 episodes per season and the season would start
right after labor day. By the late 60s it went to 26 episodes per season on average,
in the 70s 24 or 25 episodes was standard.
22 episodes per season then was the holy grail for years.
Now who knows, is it still 22?
HBO and AMC shows ....Sopranos ....Madmen...etc....much less 7 to 10 episodes per season....
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Sunny South Florida
5,681 posts, read 2,790,609 times
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In some cases, the writers/show-runners of certain shows will only agree to do 'limited series' of 13 episodes, sometimes ten. They are typically shows with a plotline that begins and ends with that number of episodes, not the "open-ended premises" of typical shows. If they can tell a story in ten episodes and then end it, more power to them; I'd rather watch a tightly-written, limited series that knows when to call it quits than watch a long-running show that starts repeating itself because it's run out of ideas. British TV does this limited series thing much better than we do, mostly because we got accustomed to series that kept going and going. We've also gotten spoiled by producers who will keep trying to squeeze every drop of money out of a show rather than quit while they're ahead.
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Old 11-26-2017, 08:18 AM
 
169 posts, read 71,515 times
Reputation: 181
I used to love "promo" season...anyone remember this one?



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S0Bi1bEYDs
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