U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > TV
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-11-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
19,070 posts, read 8,978,667 times
Reputation: 18475

Advertisements

I remember when the new fall season started shortly after Labor Day. Now I notice that many of the new and returning shows are beginning in October...a month later.

This -- and many other actions -- by networks is exactly why network television viewing continues to decline. They're their own worst enemies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-11-2017, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Maine
15,158 posts, read 19,801,513 times
Reputation: 17370
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I remember when the new fall season started shortly after Labor Day. Now I notice that many of the new and returning shows are beginning in October...a month later.

This -- and many other actions -- by networks is exactly why network television viewing continues to decline. They're their own worst enemies.
Yup. The world has moved on, and they have not moved with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2017, 11:58 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, Tx
7,179 posts, read 7,631,187 times
Reputation: 8554
This is really a lose/lose for the networks. People already complain about the breaks during a normal network tv series. Starting 3 weeks early means even more/longer breaks since the tv season runs through may.

Network television has been declining for 30 years this isnt anything new. Anymore over the air networks are a loss leader for the companies. All of them have their hands in the more profitable cable companies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
494 posts, read 337,278 times
Reputation: 981
Honestly I would be fine with less, if they were giving us things worth watching. The new fall shows look pretty pathetic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2017, 03:46 PM
 
886 posts, read 359,497 times
Reputation: 1316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooks1976 View Post
Honestly I would be fine with less, if they were giving us things worth watching. The new fall shows look pretty pathetic.
I remember as a child and teen, I'd look forward to the new tv seasons starting in the fall with returning old favorites & brand-new shows.

Nowadays, tv has very little to hold my interest.

So, I almost always just stick to YouTube where I can watch my favorite shows from decades ago anytime I want.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2017, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
21,532 posts, read 22,812,541 times
Reputation: 45373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post
Yup. The world has moved on, and they have not moved with it.
It does seem like there's a line--people will gladly wait a week between episodes for something like Game of Thrones or Outlander, but not if there's also commercials
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2017, 07:34 AM
 
7,843 posts, read 11,185,042 times
Reputation: 10085
Its so inbred they can't come up with new ideas. Outsiders with new ideas have a tough time breaking in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Canada
1,253 posts, read 734,317 times
Reputation: 3832
Not only is mainstream tv giving less in terms of episodes, but for quite some time now it's been mostly what I call "cookie-cutter" shows...they all tend to constantly mimic one another, one bad joke after another for comedies, one bad storyline after another for dramas.

To top it off, mainstream tv has to compete with sites like Netflix, where you can watch shows uninterrupted on your own time. Yet the last time I sat down and decided to watch a show that was airing on mainstream tv, not only were the ads longer than the actual show (when minutes were totalled) but when the show would come back after a loooong commercial break, the network would slap ad banners across the bottom of the tv screen, blocking some of the show as it was playing.

I think we're witnessing the beginning of the end of an era with old-style television...and no wonder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2017, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
18,203 posts, read 3,692,979 times
Reputation: 23253
Agreed...in fact, I am going to drop cable and use Netflix and Amazon Prime sites alone. Last time I watched PREACHER, seems more than half of time were commercials.


[/b]
Quote:
Originally Posted by bassetluv View Post
Not only is mainstream tv giving less in terms of episodes, but for quite some time now it's been mostly what I call "cookie-cutter" shows...they all tend to constantly mimic one another, one bad joke after another for comedies, one bad storyline after another for dramas.

To top it off, mainstream tv has to compete with sites like Netflix, where you can watch shows uninterrupted on your own time. Yet the last time I sat down and decided to watch a show that was airing on mainstream tv, not only were the ads longer than the actual show (when minutes were totalled) but when the show would come back after a loooong commercial break, the network would slap ad banners across the bottom of the tv screen, blocking some of the show as it was playing.

I think we're witnessing the beginning of the end of an era with old-style television...and no wonder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2017, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Sunny South Florida
5,721 posts, read 2,811,626 times
Reputation: 6100
Starting the new fall seasons in mid-September was problematic for decades, since the momentum of new shows would get interrupted by the baseball playoffs, then the World Series, combined with the beginning of football season for NFL and colleges. Once every four years there would also be election coverage cutting into the new premieres. I recall some shows (especially new ones trying to "make a splash") being pre-empted to the point that viewers didn't see the show regularly to form a habit of tuning in.

I am in that generation that looked forward to that extra-thick "Fall Preview" edition of TV Guide in mid-September, where the magazine would publish a full-page photo and article giving the premise/stars of every new show. They took pains not to sound pessimistic about any of the shows they profiled, no matter how ridiculous the shows sounded. That edition of the magazine was often the first I'd heard of these new shows in the pre-internet era, so it was highly anticipated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > TV
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top