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Old 09-23-2017, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,408 posts, read 1,960,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
It's a question to ask oneself - what is the point of "owning" physical copies of things such as films, music, books, magazines, etc., if these are available in digital streaming formats now? Not saying there is a right or wrong answer, just what would be the point of keeping a physical object at home if it is also digitally available.
Good question. In my case, I have about 300 favorite movies on DVD. I often take them to my boat if I'm going to spend the evening there because the WIFI internet there is not fast enough to stream Netflix. It's also great if you're RVing because RV park WIFI is notoriously slow. As far as music, all my music was purchased on CDs and then uploaded to my computer, Ipad, Ipod, etc. I have 2 cars plus the aforementioned boat. Each of them has a CD changer which allows me to switch around the music available in each. I've tried using the Ipod in the car, but it's a PITA.
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Old 09-23-2017, 05:53 PM
 
7,970 posts, read 3,869,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
If it has the copy protection features, one's machine might not know if they do or not. It only knows not to allow a VHS to DVD operation to take place.

NOW, I suppose there may be methods around to bypass such.

Personally, the way I see it is that if my machines can't do it, I stop there. If it isn't in the consumer marketplace as a "common procedure", then it was not meant to be.

That's just me, though.
Copy protection is only an issue when copying VHS to VHS. When burning to DVD with simple RCA to USB cables, the VHS just thinks it's outputting to a display like a TV. The computer can then easily burn the movie.
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Old 09-24-2017, 01:54 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
8,857 posts, read 4,826,319 times
Reputation: 7680
Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
Copy protection is only an issue when copying VHS to VHS. When burning to DVD with simple RCA to USB cables, the VHS just thinks it's outputting to a display like a TV. The computer can then easily burn the movie.
Well, perhaps, but then there is that other problem of dropped pages and limited file sizes.
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Old 09-24-2017, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Iowa
2,587 posts, read 2,888,113 times
Reputation: 3062
Quote:
Originally Posted by hertfordshire View Post
Copy protection is only an issue when copying VHS to VHS. When burning to DVD with simple RCA to USB cables, the VHS just thinks it's outputting to a display like a TV. The computer can then easily burn the movie.
Most factory VHS tapes had a copyguard signal installed after 1984. Many DVR's will pick up that signal thru the cable or RCA inputs, and when you attempt to record, it will give you an error message and not record. They make an in line filter to block that out but I never got around to buying one. If you capture the VHS signal and record with ripping software on your computer, it will work because the software does not have macro detection. The graphics card on my computer is not capable of video capture, kinda wish I had one with TV tuner, HDMI, and RCA jacks but I'm too cheap to buy one, lol.

MTV was a showcase example of why VHS sucked. They showed so many commercials, what you wanted to do was record hours and hours of video, so you could fast forward to the one video per hour that you really liked. Often you would do this at slow 6hr speed because blank tapes were somewhat expensive if you bought a quality brand. So if you wanted to save just that one video, you had to get another VCR and record tape to tape, and the video quality degraded badly doing it that way, and sound quality was also p-poor on most 80's VCR's, most were 2 head mono machines, and they sucked. 90's machines were a little better, but you also had the pause problem, when you pause a VHS tape, the head keeps spinning on the same spot of the tape, this was hard on the machine, and hard on the tape. It was also difficult to stop the tape at the exact spot you wanted to begin the recording on the other machine.

I remember renting VCR's at the video store in the mid 80s before I bought my first machine, but then sometimes I would still rent a machine so I could copy stuff from a non factory tape to another, as I could not afford 2 VCR's. Sometimes the copyguard signal on factory tapes did not prevent you from getting a fairly watchable copy, it was hit and miss. HBO was never more valuable than back in the 80's VHS days, they had the best movies and showed them often, and never showed a rated R movie before 7PM, and the really dirty ones like "Looking for Mr Goodbar" they would show those after 2 AM in the morning. They were the pipeline of great movies back in the day.
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Old 09-24-2017, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Houston
6,846 posts, read 12,394,479 times
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I don't miss VHS. I stream most shows and movies and what I can't find to stream I rent DVD/Blurays from Netflix or buy DVDs on Amazon. I'll be very sad when DVD completely goes away because I have a big collection of DVDs. Most of the DVDs I own are lesser known independent or foreign films and I love watching them when I can't find anything interesting to stream.
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Old 09-24-2017, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,288,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kab0906 View Post

Sorry but you are clinging to a technology that is inferior in every way.
Availability and convenience often trump inferiority.
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Old 09-24-2017, 06:08 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,421 posts, read 16,681,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
GWTW is available on Amazon for $9.99 in BluRay format.BluRay players are not that expensive if you don't already have one. Most of them will play any DVD format before BluRay.
The thing about the release for the 50th was that all the edits taken out since its premier were put back. The film was run through some sort of restoration system which restored the colors and the audio was replaced with a full one. It was as close to seeing the film the night of the premier (which my Grandfather did, as he worked on it, and was responsible for all that small detail that was supposed to match in period).

There's small scenes which vanished that were back too.

My grandfather would not have claimed the movie as it was chopped up before the restoration. He watched movies to see how many mistakes he could spot.

I don't know where my copy of it is, sadly. If my sil has the dvr I'll have to see if I can get it back if she isn't using it. I can find video tape movies really cheap.
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Old 09-25-2017, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
8,857 posts, read 4,826,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
It's also available for "free" streaming if you belong to Amazon Prime; Netflix has a plan that includes DVD rentals in addition to streaming & you could get the dvd from there.

It's a question to ask oneself - what is the point of "owning" physical copies of things such as films, music, books, magazines, etc., if these are available in digital streaming formats now? Not saying there is a right or wrong answer, just what would be the point of keeping a physical object at home if it is also digitally available.
Another item to this question is how much is one willing to keep paying for something, over and over, either in cash or wasted energy in desire?

Back in the days of Hastings, my general rule was if I rented it more than twice, it was time to get my own copy of it. That's how I ended up with "Gun Shy" and probably "Two Weeks Notice".

So how much does one's service cost them, how much are they paying over and over again?

In my case with Prime, probably not too much. I don't notice how much I pay per year on that but my main use of Prime is not for the streaming (which is absolutely useless to me due to remoteness) but for the S&H I save on video, audio, and books.

As I was told about one thing or another, "You are paying for it, you might as well be using it.".

The thing about paying for it, however, could be like TV cable. How much are you paying for that you never watch but still must pay for it, anyhow. If you only paid for what you watched, on a unit by unit basis (ie, the cable bill/# of channels=unit), it would be so much cheaper, right? Who, however, charges like that?

The other item of paying again and again is that of desire. Such as, "Tonight, I wish to watch "Innocent Bystanders" but wait, it isn't instantly available to me for they have to get the DVD to me (or some other inconvenience)"....so my desire goes unfulfilled. Further, by the time they do get it to me, I am no longer interested or at least, not as interested as I once was. So that energy is wasted.

There are two other small items in this area of "Why?". What if I only want to watch the Lotus chase scene from "The Spy Who Loved Me" (or, even shorter, "Rules? In a Knife Fight?")? If my service charges me on a unit by unit basis, will they charge me for the complete movie despite that I am only watching a small part of one?

The other small, perhaps very small, consideration is when one is using this or that movie in media research. In a management class once, we got to use various movies to demonstrate leadership styles. Of the various movies I pulled on, there was "The Eiger Sanction", "The Man Who Would be King", and "The Cheyenne Social Club". When it came down to referencing them, I was slightly desperate because my copies, then, were bootlegged and I had to find a service to source them to.

So here we have A, B, and C.....and then, maybe D. A: If one's service has it, that's great! B: If one's service does not have it, however, then it is something of a pain if one wants to use in their research. C: Since I do have consumer copies in the library now, when it comes down to where this or that is available, after listing the studio credits, I just put down in personal collection.

Then, there is that D item. What if one does not want to write about something but actually show it? I recall about in 2004-2006 presenting my media research either off tape or off DVD pulled from tape. Having the item in one's hot little hand, one way or another (such as developing a method to have it in possession), probably has a better chance of being successful in presentation than having to depend on a service to deliver at that moment.
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Old 09-25-2017, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
3,656 posts, read 1,195,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moneymkt View Post
I still have my VCR but I think this is the last year because I am unable to buy blanks VHS tapes now so after December I will be trashing the VCR.
You can still buy them on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...lank+VHS+tapes
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Old 09-25-2017, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
3,656 posts, read 1,195,393 times
Reputation: 6563
Quote:
Originally Posted by astrohip View Post

We can get nostalgic all we want, but there is nothing of any value that a VCR brings to this era.



Yet here I was this past Saturday, perusing some old skating competitions from 1996. I have quite a stack of tapes of old gymnastics and skating competitions, including stuff from every Olympics back to 1994, and every US National and World Championship from 1995. I also have around 30 tapes of old movies taped off of AMC (when they were a classic movie channel) and TCM that would cost a fortune for me to replace in commercial DVD/Bluray format.

Nah.... I don't get any usage from my VCRs!!
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