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Old 06-17-2015, 09:17 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,050,967 times
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I have lived in eastern TX the past 9-odd years, I grew up in eastern NC which looks a lot like here but there are differences. One I wish to ask about--city limits extending so far into the boonies.

In eastern NC, with any given town, even small ones, you won't be officially in the city limits until you start seeing the spread-out houses disappearing with businesses and crowded-together suburban-looking houses replacing them, and (in the case of smaller towns) you're almost at the city hall. If you are any distance from this at all, you will be outside the city limits and you will simply be living in the county or country in general.

By contrast, in eastern TX I noticed that you can be way in the boonies seemingly and yet STILL be in the city limits of a small town of 500-1000. It will extend easily 4-5 miles from the city hall and include homes with 50 acres of farm or ranch land, and you will occasionally even see city police patrolling the area. You will be subject to city ordinances about what grade of home you may have, how much the grass has to be cut, taxes (presumably), having to get a permit to have a garage sale, etc. You won't see a gas station or grocery store for miles, there's tons of woods and homes are all spread-out, yet technically you're in the city limits. In NC that would totally be laughable.

It totally clashes with what seems normal. You totally expect to be in the city if you're right across from the grocery store and the homes are all close together, but you DO NOT expect this when you see homes with 50 acres of farm or ranch land and no businesses in sight for eons. It just makes no sense.

Why do they do it that way here? Is it for the purpose of being able to collect more city taxes, to regulate people's behavior more vs just doing the "live and let live" thing Texans are SUPPOSED to be all about? You may recall Overton TX being in the news for harassing 2 young 7/8 year olds for wanting to sell lemonade--well their home is well in town, but Overton, which only has about 2,500 people and only a Dairy Queen as a "chain" eating place, has its city limits extend easily 3 miles from the city hall well into territory that looks like you're totally living in the country, and presumably you'd have to get a permit to have a yard sale even in an area like that. It simply makes no sense to me. It's like you have the worst of both worlds--the long drive from places to eat/shop etc from living in the country yet with the petty regulations of living in the city.

Thoughts? Is this more the norm in other places and NC the exception? Or is Texas the ones doing it backwards--and if so, again, why?
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:46 AM
 
3,029 posts, read 7,162,635 times
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1. To control the type of development that travelers see as they enter their city.
2. Revenue from speeding tickets
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:25 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,050,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ETex2 View Post
1. To control the type of development that travelers see as they enter their city.
2. Revenue from speeding tickets
Thanks for someone FINALLY answering.

Here's the thing, though, when I lived in eastern NC, it was nothing like that at all. With smaller places, you weren't in the city limits until you were practically downtown, with larger cities it was about the time you started seeing your first "on the edge of town" shopping centers, schools, houses closer together etc. Why would it be different here?

If it is for the reason you say, then between that and the Overton TX lemonade stand fiasco, it basically betrays Texas as being anything BUT a "leave me alone" Republican kind of state in any sense whatsoever. As much as Texans like to blame things on Obama and poke fun at California, things like this make it sound like they have a lot more in common with the state of California (with respect to its liberal leanings) than they'd care to admit.
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Old 06-23-2015, 11:12 AM
 
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I wouldn't condemn the entire state because of the foolish acts of a couple of idiots in Overton. Actually it's a pretty nice little town.
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Old 06-25-2015, 09:47 AM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,050,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ETex2 View Post
I wouldn't condemn the entire state because of the foolish acts of a couple of idiots in Overton. Actually it's a pretty nice little town.
Well it would be if that police chief would get his head out of his anus and stop harassing little girls selling lemonade in their own yard.
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Old 06-25-2015, 10:21 AM
 
112 posts, read 116,067 times
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Here's my two cents.

Money. Cities and towns get more than just revenue from speeding tickets. They expand their tax base.

And they do so by adding sparsely populated but taxable acreage that already has infrastructure (like wells and septic). So the cities/towns are able to collect the revenue without having to have the expense of rolling out a lot of services. Sure, police, fire and ambulance will have to drive a little farther if there's an emergency. But it's not like that is an every day ongoing expense.
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Old 06-27-2015, 07:38 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,535 posts, read 1,329,261 times
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It's all about money. Land grabs by towns surrounded by unincorporated areas give the towns tax revenue, maybe small at first, but when the land gets developed they cash in big time.
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Old 06-27-2015, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte
3,926 posts, read 4,741,386 times
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If you check the map, you will see they run out the highways. It creates what is called an ETJ, which while not part of the city, the city has some jurisdiction. Prevents undesirable development, prevents another city from annexing into the ETJ.
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:01 PM
 
200 posts, read 373,120 times
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I can't speak for Texas, but at the town where I do most of my errands the "city limits" are enormous and were drawn up about 20 years ago to accommodate the projected path of growth and development. It's gone pretty much according to plan until the housing bubble popped badly here in AZ and people stopped moving to that area in droves that were expected. It's still growing, just not as fast as they expected it to; and the city is focusing more on building up inside the "new town" around the shopping center, and less about building new suburb developments.
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