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Old 01-22-2019, 03:08 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,796 posts, read 43,960,468 times
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Ok, I’ll play. As a person who has been there only twice I had strong impressions. The first time doesn’t really count, but the second time was total immersion. We went for my son’s wedding to a Puerto Rican girl. Her huge, multi cousined, welcoming family gave us a beach house to stay in, right smack in a regular neighborhood, and next to a public beach in Vega Baja. We could walk to a few neighborhood cafes or the beach. Evenings and weekends the beach was crowded, and almost every family had music playing. That is what made the biggest impression, music everywhere. Also, how colorful everything was. Her mother’s side is from Spain and they are all blond and fair. Her father’s side is more the dark Latin looking type.

If there was anything negative about the visit, it seems like everyone is afraid of getting robbed. The house where we stayed was gated, the casa where the wedding was held was gated, and the reception came complete with guards at the entrances. We asked our DIL s father about the guards, and he said, “there are a lot of rich people here.” Not only was this an interesting glimse of the culture, but an interesting glimse at my sons new family.

We have learned that nobody with any other resources sends their children to the public schools because they are not good. My DIL and her siblings were able to go to the international school while her father worked for the Army Corps of Engineers. Her brothers attended college in PR. Now her parents pay for their grandson to attend parochial school but it’s very expensive compared to here.
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Old 01-23-2019, 07:06 PM
 
947 posts, read 391,673 times
Reputation: 977
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Originally Posted by unPescador View Post
Pure BS, same as your Psy.D.

Obviously, you are a HUNTER. You can take it whichever way you want. My Psy.D., has me living in a house over a million dollars, in a top area, and a top state. How well are you doing? Are you still FISHING.....????
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Old 01-24-2019, 09:49 PM
 
352 posts, read 578,451 times
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Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
Obviously, you are a HUNTER. You can take it whichever way you want. My Psy.D., has me living in a house over a million dollars, in a top area, and a top state. How well are you doing? Are you still FISHING.....????
Quite an unusual response. Shall we unzip and compare the size of out wallets, hopefully not.
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:25 PM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
632 posts, read 236,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
Trucker 7: I am a PSY.D, with eight years of college, and every book I have read about my profession, points out to what Johnny Come Lately states about hunters....
When living in Puerto Rico, I loved getting out with friends or solo into nature. My favorite place to do this was El Yunque National Forest. I took the público from San Juan to the park, hiked the trails, and camped out. I love that place. I also hiked the cliffs in Barranquitas. A group of us went to Isla de Mono as well as Culebra and Vieques. I never saw anything big enough to hunt, not even bush meat (a.k.a. "monkey meat").

If you are interested in debating hunting, you might find this other City-Data thread interesting:
Two deer with one shot: She's a 101-year-old hunter and she's still going strong. Some of the comments make hunting out to be barbaric, but growing up in Maine among working-class, blue-collar, "low-class", whatever you want to call "salt-of-the-earth" people, this is a foreign concept. I had neighbors and peers who did annual deer hunts. If you had a rifle and could get permission to hunt on someone's land, you did it. It helped put food on the table (gut the beast, cut it up, and put the cuts in the deep freeze for the year to come). I went on these hunts, too. People even picked up road-kill and prepared the meat.

In Canada, my grand-dad used to farm in the summer and trap in the winter. He sold the pelts (fur). He would dispatch critters caught in steel-jaw traps with a shot to the head. Barbaric, maybe, but it enabled him and my grand-mom to live independently until his passing. On occasion, I helped him carry the critters out of the woods and into his jeep. I did my best to keep the blood and brain juice leaking from the bullet hole from getting on me, but 25 to 40 pounds of *dead* weight can be heavy... walking the miles to get out of the woods.
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:26 PM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
632 posts, read 236,367 times
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Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
If there was anything negative about the visit, it seems like everyone is afraid of getting robbed. The house where we stayed was gated, the casa where the wedding was held was gated, and the reception came complete with guards at the entrances.
Even the most modest homes have bars over the windows and iron security doors. People can't rely on the police. In the U.S.A., I've also seen this in parts of Miami and on some homes in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (Brownsville) and in Nogales, Arizona. I think it is a cultural trait in much of Latin America that Latin Americans bring with them when they move to the States. I've read that Miami now has problems with home invasions.
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Old 01-31-2019, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
164 posts, read 391,673 times
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Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
Even the most modest homes have bars over the windows and iron security doors. People can't rely on the police. In the U.S.A., I've also seen this in parts of Miami and on some homes in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (Brownsville) and in Nogales, Arizona. I think it is a cultural trait in much of Latin America that Latin Americans bring with them when they move to the States. I've read that Miami now has problems with home invasions.
It's not so much cultural as a safety issue. PR has a very high crime rate (but not was bad now as it was in the 1990's). Mostly due to drug trade and gang violence, but also just random crimes (burglary/assaults).

My aunt and uncle were once held at gunpoint after a home invasion; my cousin was kidnapped and forced to empty out his account at an ATM (these happened in the mid 1990's)

It's true police are pretty much useless. If you call to file a report for something stolen, they come right away. Shootings and/or murders - not so much.

They will try to take advantage of gringos at every turn. But once you've gained their trust, they will literally give you the shirt off their backs. They are very hospitable and family oriented. My family is from PR but I was born/raised in NYC and finished my last 2 yrs of high school there and did one year at UPI. They could never understand why I didn't just come back to PR to live, lol.
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
785 posts, read 1,858,345 times
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Originally Posted by d2snow View Post

They will try to take advantage of gringos at every turn. But once you've gained their trust, they will literally give you the shirt off their backs. They are very hospitable and family oriented. My family is from PR but I was born/raised in NYC and finished my last 2 yrs of high school there and did one year at UPI. They could never understand why I didn't just come back to PR to live, lol.

Who will? I never had any issues with overcharging, dishonesty, hustling, etc. and I lived there for 2 years. Try saying that about the rest of Latin America. Honestly on my last trip to the island I couldn´t get over how in many ways everything is carried out exactly like the United States...it only feels foreign to people who don´t speak a lick of Spanish.
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Old 02-03-2019, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
164 posts, read 391,673 times
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Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Who will? I never had any issues with overcharging, dishonesty, hustling, etc. and I lived there for 2 years. Try saying that about the rest of Latin America. Honestly on my last trip to the island I couldn´t get over how in many ways everything is carried out exactly like the United States...it only feels foreign to people who don´t speak a lick of Spanish.
Oh, I speak fluent Spanish and (as I mentioned) went to Univ of Puerto Rico for 1 yr.

Once they find out you're from "afuera" (mainland) they will take their sweet time to get things done unless you are local and on top of them. Contractors, cops, doctors (most services) won't take anything but cash.

Went to a lawyer last week since I'm trying to sell my mom's old house - at least they accepted a personal check but the receipt for payment was just a fotocopy of the check with his initials scribbled on it. They claimed they couldn't give me a price sheet/quote for the services I needed because their secretary wasn't in that day.

The realtor who was renting the house for me was scamming me also. He had told me the roof needed re-sealing and gave me an outrageous price quote. I had no choice to accept it because tenants were complaining it was leaking and I live "afuera". Turns out he gave the job to a friend of his and pocketed the difference.

Trying to get water/electric turned on requires trip to the main offices with certifications from plumbers and electricians since house has been vacant before Hurricane Maria.

I can go on with more examples, but I think you get the picture.

Last edited by d2snow; 02-03-2019 at 03:48 PM.. Reason: dupe
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:00 PM
 
7 posts, read 578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d2snow View Post
Oh, I speak fluent Spanish and (as I mentioned) went to Univ of Puerto Rico for 1 yr.

Once they find out you're from "afuera" (mainland) they will take their sweet time to get things done unless you are local and on top of them. Contractors, cops, doctors (most services) won't take anything but cash.

"Cops...won't take anything but cash?"


Does that mean in PR they take bribes, such as to get out of a speeding ticket?
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Old 02-04-2019, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
785 posts, read 1,858,345 times
Reputation: 773
Quote:
Originally Posted by d2snow View Post
Oh, I speak fluent Spanish and (as I mentioned) went to Univ of Puerto Rico for 1 yr.

Once they find out you're from "afuera" (mainland) they will take their sweet time to get things done unless you are local and on top of them. Contractors, cops, doctors (most services) won't take anything but cash.

Went to a lawyer last week since I'm trying to sell my mom's old house - at least they accepted a personal check but the receipt for payment was just a fotocopy of the check with his initials scribbled on it. They claimed they couldn't give me a price sheet/quote for the services I needed because their secretary wasn't in that day.

The realtor who was renting the house for me was scamming me also. He had told me the roof needed re-sealing and gave me an outrageous price quote. I had no choice to accept it because tenants were complaining it was leaking and I live "afuera". Turns out he gave the job to a friend of his and pocketed the difference.

Trying to get water/electric turned on requires trip to the main offices with certifications from plumbers and electricians since house has been vacant before Hurricane Maria.

I can go on with more examples, but I think you get the picture.
Wow, that sounds like a whole lot of hassle. The biggest thing I had to deal with down there was shipping and later on selling my car, and no games there. Also dealing with my university (Inter San Germán) was a breeze, but they don´t call it Interamericana for nothing; they know that serving students from all over are crucial to maintaining their reputation.

I did feel a rift at times between Puerto Ricans on the Mainland and ones on the island, maybe that has something to do with it...I´m also not a fan of the Metro Area, I don´t find people there to be nearly as friendly as say the West Coast. Sure, Old San Juan is amazing and the Metro Area was fun for quick trips...but that was it...never would I live there.

A girl I dated from Yauco used to gripe about how Puerto Ricans are so quick to help gringos and give them opportunities (such as jobs teaching in universities and K-12 schools), but don´t necessarily do the same for their own. I´m not sure where she got this from, since I certainly felt like I´d hit a dead end there when I finished school. There are so many bilingual Puerto Ricans, it´s not like a gringo showing up there to look for work is really anything special....

What you said about them taking their sweet time did take me back to one thing that happened on my 2nd visit to the island before I moved. I was staying in a now-closed hotel in Isla Verde, and when I came up to the desk the woman continued to flip through a phone book for a good...say..4-5 minutes. I wanted to be patient and wait until she acknowledged me, so I just stood there until she finally looked up and proceeded to greet me in a friendly way like I had just walked in 5 seconds ago. Maybe she thought it was rude that I didn´t say good afternoon first, but I never could quite psychoanalyze that one...maybe you´re on to something with what you said.
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