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Old 01-09-2011, 04:44 PM
 
1,071 posts, read 723,278 times
Reputation: 722

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My deepest gratitude and thanks to Pescador for such a moving and beautiful song.

To Trucker 7: Everything you have written about is soooooo true. I came to this country very young, and although I speak and write in Spanish, I am more fluent in English. My mother always tried to keep the culture alive, we lived in a Caucasian area, so I married a "gringo," and we have always lived in Caucasian areas. It is confusing because my experiences living in such an area, is that I am not consider "American," because I still retain a slightly-accented speech that categorizes me as "Hispanic," yet, the last time we visited Puerto Rico, in 1980, I was not considered "Puerto Rican enough." Our ancestors were from Spain, so most of our family is very-light skinned, with light/blonde/brown hair. And our features are "European."

So in reality, I have always felt that I do not belong in the US mainland or PR.

My nieces all born in the US, love the food, not so much the music, and could not care less what happens to PR. And do not even try to learn the language.

But, I am extremely grateful for the fact that I always read the Spanish Newspapers, and listen to the music, because as a Professional Psychologist licensed, registered, and certified in two very-important states, it opened doors wide open, simply because I speak and write the Spanish language, therefore, I am considered bi-cultural. I am not perfect in either language, but who is.

I also have experienced some bias in work settings, because many other "Americans," prefer to see the Hispanics cleaning the floors, and in low-level positions, and I made sure that will never happen to me........ And if I were to die tomorrow knowing that many other Puerto Ricans have followed in my footsteps.....not necessarily in my profession, but any other profession with good training and skills, I will be the most happiest woman down under!

!Que pasen un buen dia y un prospero ano, lleno de salud, dinero, y amor!

 
Old 01-10-2011, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,383 posts, read 5,557,946 times
Reputation: 5382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trucker7 View Post
I've been several times. It's only a two hour drive from where I live. Also, many NYricans have moved to NE PA in recent years. From my observations:
1. The first generation (those who moved from the island as grown-ups) keep their Puerto Rican traditions and culture alive.
2. The second generation knows verbal Spanish, but are more fluent in English. They know a little bit from PR from visiting with their parents.
3. The third generation knows barely any Spanish and the only thing that they know about PR is that the flag has 3 red stripes, 2 white ones, a blue triangle with a white star in it. And don't get me started on how many times I've seen it inadvertently flown upside down. They might enjoy some PRican cuisine, but they are also more likely to listen to hip-hop and R&B than salsa and bomba y plena.

The exception that I have seen is when families move back and forth between PR and NYC, exposing their kids first hand to both cultures. People that are raised in a different environment are bound to develop different attitudes. You get some from your parents, some from school, and some from your neighborhood. It is not necesarilly a bad thing, it's just the way it is.

I'm experiencing this myself with my kids, who are being raised in the mainland US. A few months back, I was eating at a Mexican restaurant, and they had live mariachis. They swung by my table and I asked them to play "En mi viejo San Juan". Listening to it brought tears to my eyes. As for my kids, they couldn't care less.
Have you been to the Bronx? May Puerto Ricans here knows spanish, and some don't. What I am trying to say is that you will find many Puerto Ricans that knows spanish. I understand that some may listen to Hip Hop more than Hispanic music... So does that means that they are not Puerto Rican? No. It does not means that Puerto Ricans do not follow their culture. Actually many people do not know this, but Hip Hop was created by Puerto Ricans and African Americans in the South Bronx.

Read below:

From Bomba to Hip-Hop: Bomba al Estilo Hip Hop | Puerto Rican Chicago

Videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS4yY...eature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5euW...eature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnPXc...eature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMwwy...eature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzQpR...eature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_sXc...eature=related

If you do not see all the videos please watch video 4 video 5


Also many of the famous salsa singers were from New York. Do you know Hector Lavoe, Ray Barretto, Tito Puente, They all embraced the Puerto Rican culture, and they all speaked Spanish.
 
Old 01-10-2011, 07:09 PM
 
232 posts, read 286,780 times
Reputation: 337
Don't know about everyone else but I thought Marc Anthony's re-make of Hector Lavoe's "El Cantante" was great, except for the last track where J Lo snuck a song onto the album.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0KXQ9UknPQ
 
Old 01-10-2011, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Scranton
1,273 posts, read 1,452,915 times
Reputation: 1396
Quote:
Originally Posted by nycricanpapi View Post
Have you been to the Bronx? May Puerto Ricans here knows spanish, and some don't. What I am trying to say is that you will find many Puerto Ricans that knows spanish. I understand that some may listen to Hip Hop more than Hispanic music... So does that means that they are not Puerto Rican? No. It does not means that Puerto Ricans do not follow their culture. Actually many people do not know this, but Hip Hop was created by Puerto Ricans and African Americans in the South Bronx.
I'll say that Nuyorican culture is a fork of Puerto Rican culture, but no, it's not the same. My great grandparents came from Spain, and many of the customs and traditions that we have in PR come from Spain. Yet, I don't see anyone on the island identify themselves as Spaniards. The Spanish settlers on the island adopted some of the African and Taíno cultures and created a unique culture found only in PR.

The Puerto Rican settlers in NYC adopted some of the African-American and general New York culture and created a unique culture found only in the NYC metro area. You have to remember that most PRicans emigrated to NYC in the 1940's and 1950's. It's been 60 years since the great migration. I was born and raised in PR, and have lived in Orlando and New Jersey. You'll find a more authentic PRican culture amongst the Orlando Puerto Ricans, mainly because the PRican emigration to Orlando has happened in recent years and most of them were born and raised on the island. I'm pretty sure that 50 years from now, the grandchildren of those PRicans that now live in Orlando will have developed a distinct "OrlandoRican" culture, different from that of the island.

Nuyorican - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quote:
Nuyorican is a blending of the terms "New York" and "Puerto Rican" and refers to the members or culture of the Puerto Rican diaspora located in or around New York State especially the New York City metropolitan area, or of their descendants (especially those raised or still living in the New York area). Nuyoricans are not considered Puerto Ricans by island Puerto Ricans due to cultural differences; this is a very controversial topic amongst both groups of Puerto Ricans.
While the term has negative connotations to some, it is proudly used by some members of this community to identify their history and cultural affiliation to a common ancestry while being separated from the island, both physically and through language and cultural shifts. This distance created a dual identity that, while still somewhat identifying with the island, recognizes the influences both geography and cultural assimilation have had.
The Nuyorican's Dilemma: Categorization of Returning Migrants in Puerto Rico.
Quote:
Abstract:A brief narrative description of the journal article, document, or resource.Investigated self and social categorization of Puerto Rican returning migrants (Nuyoricans). Surveys indicated that migrant and non-migrant high school students evaluated Nuyorican adolescents as significantly different from adolescents raised in Puerto Rico. Student evaluations of adolescents differing in salience of Nuyorican attributes (presented via photos and audiotapes) indicated that language characteristics and physical appearance could categorize people as Nuyorican. (SM)
 
Old 01-11-2011, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,383 posts, read 5,557,946 times
Reputation: 5382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trucker7 View Post
I'll say that Nuyorican culture is a fork of Puerto Rican culture, but no, it's not the same. My great grandparents came from Spain, and many of the customs and traditions that we have in PR come from Spain. Yet, I don't see anyone on the island identify themselves as Spaniards. The Spanish settlers on the island adopted some of the African and Taíno cultures and created a unique culture found only in PR.

The Puerto Rican settlers in NYC adopted some of the African-American and general New York culture and created a unique culture found only in the NYC metro area. You have to remember that most PRicans emigrated to NYC in the 1940's and 1950's. It's been 60 years since the great migration. I was born and raised in PR, and have lived in Orlando and New Jersey. You'll find a more authentic PRican culture amongst the Orlando Puerto Ricans, mainly because the PRican emigration to Orlando has happened in recent years and most of them were born and raised on the island. I'm pretty sure that 50 years from now, the grandchildren of those PRicans that now live in Orlando will have developed a distinct "OrlandoRican" culture, different from that of the island.

Nuyorican - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Nuyorican's Dilemma: Categorization of Returning Migrants in Puerto Rico.
See now I can agree with you on that lol. Before you were saying that NYRicans don't embrace the PRican culture
 
Old 01-13-2011, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
80 posts, read 156,834 times
Reputation: 69
as a gringo that lives in Aguadilla, i can say that it does not matter if you where born here or not the locals always treat me like i have been here my whole life.
 
Old 02-05-2011, 06:51 PM
 
4 posts, read 6,258 times
Reputation: 18
I agree. As a gringo from Rincon, I really never got into the "Rincon gringo bubble" scene, as I have a Boricua girlfriend from outside of the town -- an area that's certainly devoid of gringos. I've developed close friendships with her friends and family, and everyone has treated me like gold. Of course, I'm extremely down to earth and friendly with everyone, so that helps. Gringos got the "reputation" because people feel that a lot of us come to Puerto Rico and start dictating what they want. It goes a long, long way if you keep an open mind, attempt to learn some Spanish, and accept customs.
 
Old 02-06-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
635 posts, read 1,067,543 times
Reputation: 524
While we may think that gringo means "foreigner" or "American" or something like that, my neighbor was telling me that people call her gringa simply because she's bilingual. She's 100% PRican and all that but the association is still made..interesting, no?
 
Old 02-07-2011, 12:25 PM
 
91 posts, read 184,748 times
Reputation: 78
I say if you're natural language is English, then, yes, you will be considered a "gringo," or simply an "americano." If you make it a point to speak Spanish, and absorb the culture, then you may eventually just be considered a "boricua criado en Estados Unidos" or something of that sort. The only other distinction made in the island towards mainlanders is in reference to NY Ricans; which can be referred to as either "gringo," "americano" or "nuyorrican."

Disclaimer: this has been my experience along my upbringing spanning the 70's, 80's and 90's. Perhaps this has changed as more and more PRicans have moved to the mainland, not anymore necessarily as poor barrio settlers; I get the feeling that as this exchange happens more, and as the island gets more sophisticated, there will be less alienation towards the slightly different and, thus, less use of such labels or divisive terms.
 
Old 02-08-2011, 01:05 AM
 
Location: PA
18,837 posts, read 9,091,383 times
Reputation: 7883
Quote:
Originally Posted by nycricanpapi View Post
It seems that you have never been to NYC. You cannot go by what you see. If you would come to NYC, you will see we do more than just waving the flag. Many of us speaks Spanish, and knows how to "parrandear" like in PR.
No offense but pretty much all of you are gringo. Some of my family live in south Bronx and it's as un Puerto Rican as any other place in the U.S. It's its own special community nowadays. Accent is diverging, and word use is different in a small extent
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