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Old Yesterday, 10:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
I have long believed we should do just that when the Palau, Micronesia, and Marshall Islands compacts expire in the 2020s using the Northern Mariana Islands as an enticement (a "You can be like them! Look at those nice checks they get every month!" deal).

As an added benefit it would create a 3rd line of defense against China.
With Guam and the Northern Marianas already US territories, I'm not sure there would be any additional advantage to the US in having the independent countries in Micronesia other than getting to a population threshold where a state could be formed.

When you look at the Per Capita PPP (basically GDP controlled for cost of living) you see how most of Micronesia has such underdeveloped economies that it would basically be a black hole for federal money. Palau ($16K/yr) and Nauru ($12K/yr) are the only countries in Micronesia that have even similar living standards to the US Territory of the Northern Marianas($13K/yr). Guam ($30K/yr) us by far the wealthiest territory or country in Micronesia, but it is still a little poorer than the poorest state, Mississippi ($35K/yr). For FSM and the Marshalls, the PPP per capita income in both are about $3K/year, or about 10K less than the Northern Mariana Islands. Kiribati is at $6K/yr, or a little less than half of the Northern Marianas. There is just not a way this area could function economically as part of the US without dumping massive amounts of money into it.
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Old Yesterday, 11:02 PM
 
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Just for reference, here is the PPP per capita for all inhabited US Territories:
District of Columbia: $185K/yr
Puerto Rico: $40K/yr
US Virgin Islands: $36K/yr
Guam: $30K/yr
Northern Mariana Islands: $13K/yr
American Samoa: $13K/yr

US Average: $55K/yr
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Old Today, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Earth
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just turn them into forward operating bases or use them for the missle shield against china and north korea


CHina will pour money into these islands and then take them over like africa
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Old Today, 01:57 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
With Guam and the Northern Marianas already US territories, I'm not sure there would be any additional advantage to the US in having the independent countries in Micronesia other than getting to a population threshold where a state could be formed.

When you look at the Per Capita PPP (basically GDP controlled for cost of living) you see how most of Micronesia has such underdeveloped economies that it would basically be a black hole for federal money. Palau ($16K/yr) and Nauru ($12K/yr) are the only countries in Micronesia that have even similar living standards to the US Territory of the Northern Marianas($13K/yr). Guam ($30K/yr) us by far the wealthiest territory or country in Micronesia, but it is still a little poorer than the poorest state, Mississippi ($35K/yr). For FSM and the Marshalls, the PPP per capita income in both are about $3K/year, or about 10K less than the Northern Mariana Islands. Kiribati is at $6K/yr, or a little less than half of the Northern Marianas. There is just not a way this area could function economically as part of the US without dumping massive amounts of money into it.
That is true however the populations of Palau, the Marshall Islands, and Micronesia are relatively small and a good number of the islanders would likely take off for Guam, Hawaii, or the mainland the second they are granted US citizenship. The cost of transfer payments would be relatively small ... compared even to American Samoa the current least populated territory.

Secondly, annexing these islands would create yet another barrier against the Chinese. It's more about geopolitics than dollars and cents. Do you think the Chinese sit around and argue about the cost of Tibet, Hong Kong, Macau, or Xinjiang?
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Old Today, 02:07 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Californiaguy2007 View Post
I just think it's rather strange for any former U.S possessions to choose Independence and then later down the road want to return back to become part of the U.S.
The US never formally annexed any of the trust territories as they were exactly that, trust territories ... they were 'owned' by the UN but administered by the United States.

The grass isn't always greener on the other side. Several years ago a poll by the Jamaica Gleaner found that on the 50th anniversary of independence the majority of Jamaicans (60%) felt that Jamaica was better off as a British colony.
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...er-colony.html
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Old Today, 02:45 PM
 
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This is one of the reasons why Guam and The CNMI continuously chose to remain with the U.S,because they know Independence would be the downfall for their islands.

Interestingly every place where the British established themselves in the past ended up becoming prosperous countries today.

1)The United States
2)Canada
3)Australia

Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
The grass isn't always greener on the other side. Several years ago a poll by the Jamaica Gleaner found that on the 50th anniversary of independence the majority of Jamaicans (60%) felt that Jamaica was better off as a British colony.
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...er-colony.html
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