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Old 04-28-2011, 11:14 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
3,814 posts, read 10,235,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graywms View Post
Can you apply for the "EB" payments. That usually comes after you complete the tiers???
If you don't have sufficient weeks of regular unemployment benefits to qualify for the EUC Tiers, in New Jersey you will also be ineligible for the EB extension. One criterion for eligibility for both EUC and EB is the number of weeks of regular benefits for which you qualified.
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Old 04-28-2011, 01:10 PM
 
163 posts, read 464,953 times
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The issue of "timing" is so confusing to me. I've never collected unemployment so I'm really not sure how it works.

So let's say you are self-employed on the west coast until Jan. 2011. Then you start working full-time plus part-time as well in NJ. Then after 2 months, your job sends you to MA to work. So from March until maybe end of May, 2011 you work in MA. You know a lay-off is coming.

So when would be the "best" time to file for unemployment? And which state is best?

It seems like they all figure out the base year is a strange way.
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Old 04-28-2011, 01:11 PM
 
163 posts, read 464,953 times
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To the OP, I thought that in NJ as long as you make over a certain amount, you can get full benefits even if it's not a large number of work weeks?
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Old 04-28-2011, 02:01 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
3,814 posts, read 10,235,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scal2010 View Post
To the OP, I thought that in NJ as long as you make over a certain amount, you can get full benefits even if it's not a large number of work weeks?
Not true -- the fact that you are eligible for unemployment benefits does not guarantee you the maximum benefit. For example, the maximum number of weeks of regular unemployment benefits is 26 -- but based on your earnings over a set period of time, you may be eligible for benefits but still not qualify for the max.
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Old 04-28-2011, 02:38 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
3,814 posts, read 10,235,100 times
Reputation: 937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scal2010 View Post
The issue of "timing" is so confusing to me. I've never collected unemployment so I'm really not sure how it works.

So let's say you are self-employed on the west coast until Jan. 2011. Then you start working full-time plus part-time as well in NJ. Then after 2 months, your job sends you to MA to work. So from March until maybe end of May, 2011 you work in MA. You know a lay-off is coming.

So when would be the "best" time to file for unemployment? And which state is best?

It seems like they all figure out the base year is a strange way.
A few things:
(1) You do not earn any credit toward unemployment benefits while you are self-employed. So your employment on the west coast would not be considered in the determination of eligibility for unemployment benefits moving forward. A handful of states do offer self-employment assistance programs for new entrepreneurs that provide weekly self-employment allowances in lieu of unemployment insurance benefits, but you would have to check with the state in which you were self-employed to see if you would be eligible.

(2) To be eligible for unemployment benefits, you must have worked in a qualifying job for a set number of weeks in a time period set by your state -- or your qualifying earnings over that period must be a certain level. For example, in NJ you must have worked at least 20 weeks or earned at least $7,300 over a 52-week base year. The 52 weeks of the base year used to calculate your eligibility are the first four of the most recent five calendar quarters -- so earnings in the most recent quarter are not included.

(3) Because of the base year calculation, people sometimes delay filing for unemployment until they have moved into the next calendar quarter after they become unemployed -- to ensure that as much as possible of their eligible earnings are considered in the benefit calculation.

(4) Technically, you have no choice about the state in which you file for unemployment. You must first file in the last state where you were employed and received qualified earnings. If you are denied benefits there, you can then file in the next to last state when you were unemployed. Some states will combine your eligible earnings over a shorter period to determine your benefits -- but this varies from state to state. If the case of employment in multiple states, if you file in the wrong state, that state will refer to you the state in which you should be filing.

The best way to start this process is for you to read up on the requirements for unemployment benefits in the states where you have had qualifying employment. Each state has a website describing the requirements for unemployment benefits.

Then you need to actually file a claim, and see how your last state of employment determines your eligibility -- and proceed from there.
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Old 04-29-2011, 08:29 AM
 
163 posts, read 464,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diorgirl View Post
A few things:
(1) You do not earn any credit toward unemployment benefits while you are self-employed. So your employment on the west coast would not be considered in the determination of eligibility for unemployment benefits moving forward. A handful of states do offer self-employment assistance programs for new entrepreneurs that provide weekly self-employment allowances in lieu of unemployment insurance benefits, but you would have to check with the state in which you were self-employed to see if you would be eligible.

(2) To be eligible for unemployment benefits, you must have worked in a qualifying job for a set number of weeks in a time period set by your state -- or your qualifying earnings over that period must be a certain level. For example, in NJ you must have worked at least 20 weeks or earned at least $7,300 over a 52-week base year. The 52 weeks of the base year used to calculate your eligibility are the first four of the most recent five calendar quarters -- so earnings in the most recent quarter are not included.

(3) Because of the base year calculation, people sometimes delay filing for unemployment until they have moved into the next calendar quarter after they become unemployed -- to ensure that as much as possible of their eligible earnings are considered in the benefit calculation.

(4) Technically, you have no choice about the state in which you file for unemployment. You must first file in the last state where you were employed and received qualified earnings. If you are denied benefits there, you can then file in the next to last state when you were unemployed. Some states will combine your eligible earnings over a shorter period to determine your benefits -- but this varies from state to state. If the case of employment in multiple states, if you file in the wrong state, that state will refer to you the state in which you should be filing.

The best way to start this process is for you to read up on the requirements for unemployment benefits in the states where you have had qualifying employment. Each state has a website describing the requirements for unemployment benefits.

Then you need to actually file a claim, and see how your last state of employment determines your eligibility -- and proceed from there.

Thanks for the info. I will be moving back to NJ and it seems like some people I've read here said they filed in one state but then canceled it when they realized they would make more in another state. So it made it sound like they have a choice in which state they file (when they have combined income.)

Since I'm moving back to NJ after this job in MA ends, I was thinking it would be easier logistically to file my "combined income" form there. I'm not expecting to get unemployment for a very long time since I was self-employed for most of the year. I'm praying I get another job fast so it might not even be an issue. If not though, the job I have pays about $1K a week so I would qualify based on earnings in either NJ or MA.

It's unclear to me how MA decides their quarter system though. They seem to allow for someone who only has 1 or 2 quarters by cutting in half the benefit time to 13 weeks.

When I calculated everything though, there was a drastic difference in the amount. NJ was much higher and for much longer. So of course I would rather file there but even if I do, then MA would be my "paying" state so I'm assuming I would have to go by their numbers, right?
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