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Old 09-03-2012, 01:21 PM
 
3,310 posts, read 3,555,730 times
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You need to qualify your statement. It appears to be about a 50/50 split of the states that allow it, and those that restrict it to military spouses, and even the military issue can have restrictions. As in, don't be posting stuff like the below like it's universal. Even states that allow trailing spouses, many require that the spouse's new job has to be materially better than the one they left. There are enough wrinkles in the process that I'd hate to make a blanket statement only to have someone very dispointed in the outcome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amberdawn2344 View Post
You are actually wrong, if your spouse has to relocate to another state for work and there is no way to transfer or commute to your job you can collect unemployment. It's called quitting your job for a legitimate reason.
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:13 PM
 
Location: California
4,404 posts, read 4,500,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amberdawn2344 View Post
You are actually wrong, if your spouse has to relocate to another state for work and there is no way to transfer or commute to your job you can collect unemployment. It's called quitting your job for a legitimate reason.
No, it actually isn't.

As Chyvan said, please do not make blanket statements when you are unaware of the facts. I can think of one, CA, in which it is possible, and one TX in which it is almost impossible. And those are the 2 I can think of off the top of my head.

It is a disservice to come to the forum and make a blanket statement like this, when people rely on this advice.
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:49 AM
 
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What state were you able to get unemployment from? I tried recently from MA as my husband relocated to Puerto Rico but was refused. I am appealing and would appreciate any info you can give me.
Thanks,
Val
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:57 AM
 
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From here http://workforcesecurity.doleta.gov/...onmonetary.pdf on page 5-6 is a table that lists the states and the various reason for following a spouse. MA appears to have no trailing spouse provision of any kind.
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Old 03-29-2013, 02:20 PM
 
4 posts, read 7,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisjacek View Post
Actually, this reply is 100% wrong. If you work in California, and you have to relocate because of your spouse's job situation, you can collect UE benefits. I did the very exact thing when I moved with my wife (at the time) to Texas. She had to relocate, or lose her job.

Frankly, I think it is very callous to suggest that this is unfair. You have paid into the system, and you obviously should be able to claim the benefit in your time of need. To just suggest that the couple needs to "deal with it" in not only insensitive, but it is also moronic. Even if you take the splitting of the family aspect out of the equation, it is idiotic to suggest that trying to support 2 households in different states is a legitimate way to "make it work."

In my situation, the system worked exactly as it should. I moved with my spouse, and had a new job in my new state in about 3 months. At that time, I stopped collecting benefits.


Is this only in California or does it apply to all states. My husband was laid off in Oklahoma and we moved to Washington for a job opportunity for him. I was gainfully employed and "quit" only so we could keep our family together (we tried living in 2 different states when he moved to OK for a job). I wonder if I could qualify for unemployment benefits?!
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Old 03-29-2013, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
13,149 posts, read 16,069,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GramNegativeRod View Post
Is this only in California or does it apply to all states. My husband was laid off in Oklahoma and we moved to Washington for a job opportunity for him. I was gainfully employed and "quit" only so we could keep our family together (we tried living in 2 different states when he moved to OK for a job). I wonder if I could qualify for unemployment benefits?!
No, the trailing spouse benefit does not apply to all states. Some states allow trailing spouse only for military families. Others don't allow it at all.

If this link is still correct, you would qualify for trailing spouse unemployment benefits from Oklahoma:

Which States Allow Unemployment for a Trailing Spouse? | eHow.com

You should apply for benefits.

This link provides better info (if correct), than OK site - which is barren of any useful information.

Applying for Oklahoma Unemployment Benefits - Ten Things You Need to Know
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Old 04-11-2014, 01:58 PM
 
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Based on current information (April 2010), you may be eligible for UC benefits in the following States:

Arkansas (any job transfer including military)
California (any job transfer, including military)
Colorado (any job transfer, including military)
Connecticut (military transfer only)
Delaware (any job transfer, including military)
Florida (military transfer only)
Georgia (military transfer only)
Illinois (any job transfer, including military)
Indiana (any job transfer, including military)
Kansas (any job transfer, including military)
Kentucky (military transfer only)
Maine (any job transfer, including military);
Maryland (military transfer only)
Massachusetts (any job transfer, including military)
Michigan (military transfer only)
Minnesota (any job transfer, including military)
Montana (military transfer only)
Nebraska (any job transfer, including military)
Nevada (military transfer only)
New Hampshire (any job transfer, including military)
New Jersey (military transfer only)
New Mexico (military transfer only)
New York (any job transfer, including military)
North Carolina (any job transfer, including military)
Oklahoma (any job transfer, including military)
Rhode Island (any job transfer, including military)
South Carolina (military transfer only)
Texas (military transfer only)
Virginia (military transfer only)
Virgin Islands (any job transfer, including military)
Washington (any job transfer, including military)
Wisconsin (any job transfer, including military)
Wyoming (military transfer only)
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Old 06-18-2014, 01:41 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,276 times
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I recently moved from NYC to Whitehall PA. I work for the TSA and took a transfer from JFK to PHL. Unfortunately, the trip from where I live to work takes two hours. I didn't realize it would take so long to get to work. When I researched how long the trip would take (google maps) the average time was an hour and 15 minutes but with traffic, road work and transportation from the employee parking lot to the airport terminal I work in ( about half an hour) door to door is two hours. Furthermore the transfer cut my hours by ten hours per pay period. I am only a part time worker with the TSA (now only four hours a day) so those ten hours make a big difference in my pay.
I is not really worth it for me to travel four hours a day to work a job for four hours and spend almost half my salary just getting to work.
If i leave can I get unemployment from either nyc or pa?
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Old 06-18-2014, 02:15 AM
 
3,310 posts, read 3,555,730 times
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This is complex. The real meat is in WHY you took the transfer and WHAT was offerred to you, and WHETHER you got what you bargained for.

If you knew where the job was, that it was only 4 hours/shift, and that's what you got, then you don't have much to work with.

If on the other hand, you were told it would be fulltime and you only got part-time hours, that would help your case, but as a quitter, you'd have to be able to prove that it was a full-time offer, and you just saying it would probably not be enough. However, there is also the chance that your employer would admit to it, so that doesn't mean you shouldn't try just the same.

Truth is, if you don't try, then the answer is automatically no. Because TSA is probably Federal employment, the state issue gets a little fuzzy and is beyond my full understanding. With Federal employment, the state acts as an adminstrator applying it's laws. The part that gets fuzzy when you move is does the base period stay in the state where the work was performed or is it somewhat fluid and moves with you as you move around. I don't know that part.

Knowing it's not so clear, but someone here might know the ins and outs, I think you should start in PA because their max benefit is higher and they have a better partial benefit formula. Better yet, figure out things and use the benefit calulators so that you apply to take advantage of the most favorable rules available to you If you fail, you can always save your PA denial (if it's because of base period earnings) and use that to get NY to back date your claim so that you aren't penalized if you apply in the wrong state at the beginning.
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Old 07-15-2014, 02:03 PM
 
1 posts, read 216 times
Reputation: 10
I've been at my job for 28 years. My wife and I are moving to Florida because she got a really good job. We live in Massachusetts. Obviously we have to go and she needs to take this job, I do not have a job lined up. We are planning to leave the end of August 2014. Will I be eligible for a claim with unemployment? I should be, no? I've paid into the system all these years. It may take a while before I find something. The link to the "state chart description" is a bit confusing. Can you please help me? Thanks!
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