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Old 07-20-2013, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Oakland CA
7,012 posts, read 9,294,724 times
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Seems to me this service found a catchy twist in doing house genealogy. A lot of people are interested in who lived in my old house before me, and it's a bit of an undertaking.

But as far as stigmatized properties -- the thing is it's a disclosure. If it didn't happen while you were there, and you don't know about it, doesn't mean it didn't happen, but it won't be disclosed and most states that would satisfy disclosure laws...
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Old 07-20-2013, 02:04 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,290 posts, read 4,445,608 times
Reputation: 8956
How does the service determine deaths in an old house?
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Old 07-20-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Texas South High Plains
7,024 posts, read 6,351,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
There has been a lot of discussion about stigmatized properties and with belief in ghosts at an all time high, it's not surprising that someone has decided to capitalize on it.
In regard to your question, no, I do not know who or why the bullet hole is in my front door. I have since patched it with plaster and painted it on the inside but I left the hole on the outside just to show friends and visitors.

Prior to buying this farm a few years ago, I visited another rural home with a realtor where the owner had been shot dead in the living room by a fellow whose wife had been fooling around with the home owner. The shooter also shot dead his surprised wife in the hallway and another person trying to escape out the front door. Afterward, the house had been listed by other family members and that's when I discovered it in the MLS. When I first drove up in front with the realtor, I was astonished that the property was listed so low in price. It was a large custom-built brick home on acreage with a redwood (or cedar) lined indoor swimming area and a new barn with living quarters in it. The realtor saw my amazement as we got out of the cars, then quickly commenced to tell me the story of the shooting that had been in so many of the State's newspapers. I was aware of the story but I just didn't know that it was the same house. However, had I been ready to buy right then, I would be writing this reply from that house. I am a biologist as well as a Christian. It is my belief that, once your heart stops beating, you've a lot larger concerns than haunting some place on Earth. The living areas of the murder house had been remodeled since the shooting.

BTW, I just sold a house in a small west Texas town where a young man had gone into one of the garages a few years prior and had hung himself. Prior to selling the property, I had rented it though. I always told my potential renters about the incident and even showed them the spot in the garage where the guy was found hanging by a rafter. It never seemed to bother the renters. In fact, I would guess that most of the people who rented that house after the incident knew the young man personally. I also disclosed the incident to the buyer. He didn't care. I just hope he doesn't die in the house. He is making monthly notes to me.
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Old 07-20-2013, 04:16 PM
 
Location: somewhere flat
616 posts, read 219,284 times
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Murder would do it for me. There are plenty of houses on the market, why buy one that has had a tragic event take place inside.

It's also not a good investment.

I've noticed that many of these houses become rental properties. Not all landlords "do the right thing" like High_Plains_Retired, and tell the prospective renters.
On so many ghost documentaries, it seems it's a rental property that's effected.

Anyone else notice that?
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Old 07-20-2013, 04:36 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,290 posts, read 4,445,608 times
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People who don't think homes tarnished by violent incidents affect future inhabitants are not paying attention.

Rituals and reconstruction can help . . . but I believe some kind of physical and spiritual acknowledgement and restoration is in order.

If you know someone was tormented, why would you not think that would have any effect on future inhabitants. Energy never dies, it only transforms . . . and violent energy can be sticky and must be cleansed. This is just basic common sense.
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Old 07-20-2013, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Oakland CA
7,012 posts, read 9,294,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imcurious View Post
How does the service determine deaths in an old house?
Just like doing genealogy, you do research into who owns the house. You know you, you know who you bought it from, and the parcel number of the home. You go to the county records office and go through the books of deed transfers to find out who sold the home to the previous own and work backwards, until the house is built... and even more of the house replaced what was on the land previously.

Armed with those names, it's time to hit the library or local LDS church where you can access census records if it's on or before 1940 (1950 census will be out in a mere 9 years!), to get some information, and then you can look up obits, death certs and news articles.

You *might* be able to get some of this stuff online, but the sad fact is that there is veritable mountains of info that are not online. And will never be. In places like where I live the sheer amount of records that would need to be scanned and inputted and translated so every one could read them would be -- well -- simply not worth it. If you are truly interested, you will seek out the information. If you are little interested you can hire someone to do the work for you.

I do genealogy and find that my siblings and their offspring are very happy to receive the information, there is interest in it.... but only as long as it is handed to them and explained for them. If they had to do it themselves, it wouldn't get done.

Which is the very definition of a hobby. It's not hard, but it is time consuming and yeah -- you can get caught up in the history.

Heck, I found out my 3rd great grandfather died a Union POW in a Confederate camp in Millen GA... and it broke my heart. It felt like it happened yesterday. I had a few genealogy friends who let me cry on their shoulders.

I got very angry when I found out that he was in an unmarked grave, and as I funneled through the story, I got angrier at the injustice of his burial spot being taken away and then I found out they started an archeological excavation of the area.... then I got the rest of the story -- he's buried with honors in a military cemetery in Beaufort South Carolina.

But I did learn a lesson. Very often -- in fact, almost always -- you get only part of the history. The part that's important to the person who's telling it. I ended up going to multiple sites to find out the whole truth. None of those sites were linked together, none of them were first in the search engines -- they all took some digging. But I did find out he's got a real burial site, and was buried with honors. Would have been nicer if it had been on the right side of the Mason Dixon Line, as he was from a PA infantry.... but I can't have everything.
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Old 07-20-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Texas South High Plains
7,024 posts, read 6,351,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourn View Post
Not all landlords "do the right thing" like High_Plains_Retired, and tell the prospective renters.
Not to give me too much credit. This place did have a really good rental market. Houses on large lots (1/2 city block) were impossible to find even in the small town where the house was. For the ten years we owned the property, we normally had people wanting it before the old tenants moved out. I think pretty much everyone in town knew about the boy who died in the garage.

We sold the property simply because this particular Texas county is haunted by some of the State's highest property tax rates. The County also is one of the two or three last remaining Texas counties (there are 254 counties in Texas) that still has the old 1950s-style county property taxes on POVs. But that's a story for the Real Estate forums...
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Old 07-20-2013, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Texas South High Plains
7,024 posts, read 6,351,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imcurious View Post
People who don't think homes tarnished by violent incidents affect future inhabitants are not paying attention.
To who? Hollywood?
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Old 07-20-2013, 07:33 PM
 
2,476 posts, read 4,538,468 times
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When we were house hunting the first question my Mother would ask was "Who died in here"? I have to laugh - she is since passed but my husband would get so embarrassed but I thought it was a legitimate question. I don't want to live in a house where anyone died - even if it was natural or peaceful - just my personal preference. Nor would I like to live in a house where a baby died - crib death - maybe the baby does not even know it is dead? Spooky.

I do think houses retain "energy" years ago we bought a home from a divorced couple and I felt bad energy in there - even thought it affected my marriage. We then moved into a house where the woman did not come outside much - it felt a little oppressive in the home - we are now in a rental where I feel all positive energy and I really like it and am happy.

Even if you don't believe in residual energy - many do - and it might affect your resale down the line - so it is good to know who died where.
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Old 07-20-2013, 09:41 PM
 
10,489 posts, read 8,148,974 times
Reputation: 14193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairfax Mom View Post
When we were house hunting the first question my Mother would ask was "Who died in here"? I have to laugh - she is since passed but my husband would get so embarrassed but I thought it was a legitimate question. I don't want to live in a house where anyone died - even if it was natural or peaceful - just my personal preference. Nor would I like to live in a house where a baby died - crib death - maybe the baby does not even know it is dead? Spooky.

I do think houses retain "energy" years ago we bought a home from a divorced couple and I felt bad energy in there - even thought it affected my marriage. We then moved into a house where the woman did not come outside much - it felt a little oppressive in the home - we are now in a rental where I feel all positive energy and I really like it and am happy.

Even if you don't believe in residual energy - many do - and it might affect your resale down the line - so it is good to know who died where.
I also think homes retain energy. I've walked away from some prospective homes because I thought that I picked up "bad vibes" there. Sometimes the air was heavy or almost vibrates or buzzes. No jokes please.

Also, when I was about ten, my father heard about a house that was for sale for a low price in a rather exclusive location. Normally, this would have interested my socially conscious mother, but she said she had a bad feeling about it. After a few exchanges back and forth we piled into the station wagon and headed for the house with the water view and the low price.

We approached the house and the gates were closed. My dad had a security code. as the gates opened, I felt a sadness.

It was not a "typical haunted house". Nothing like "The Addams Family" or "The Munsters". Instead, it was a sprawling glass and brick modern ranch house with a view of Connecticut and the Long Island Sound.

Inside it was strangely dark. With all of those glass walls, one would think it would be a bright house. It was not. It was gloomy. I went into the bedroom that would have been mine and there was strange crayon scribbling on the walls.

My mother said flatly "there is something wrong with this house".

My parents argued a bit and ultimately, did not purchase the house.

A year or so later a doctor his wife and their four children did buy the house.

Two years later the wife was killed in a fire.

I don't remember the address and I'm sure my father doesn't even remember the incident. He's 82 and his memory isn't good.

If I did, I'd do a check on that property.
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