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Old 07-11-2018, 06:13 AM
 
Location: London, U.K.
88 posts, read 24,355 times
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There isn't much really known about the mystical beliefs of George Bernard Shaw, a heavyweight member of The Fabian Society as shown below:-


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Bernard_Shaw


But we might get a clue, as he had a roving eye for the ladies, two very important ladies in his life, one helped him be a playwright, but both of them were members of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn involved in ceremonial magic, links below:-


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annie_Horniman


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Farr
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Old 07-11-2018, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Maine
15,072 posts, read 19,713,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Smith View Post
There isn't much really known about the mystical beliefs of George Bernard Shaw, a heavyweight member of The Fabian Society as shown below:-
Shaw didn't have any mystical beliefs. He was a die-hard materialist and skeptic. He and Chesterton had many amiable arguments over this very subject.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:43 AM
 
Location: London, U.K.
88 posts, read 24,355 times
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Hi MarkS,


You are right, but many of his associates, girl friends, and Fabian Society peers did hold strange beliefs.


His house at 29 Fitzroy Square was a "Grim Old Place", while he worked on plays upstairs in squalor, his mother neglected all house work, communicating with the dead on her planchette and ouija board, according to Michael Holroyd in his biography.


It would be easy to think he associated with those that had strange beliefs by his actions!


Please scroll down to bottom of link to read about George Bernard Shaw's time at 29 Fitzroy Square on link below:
https://www.thewordtravels.com/virgi...oy-square.html
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Maine
15,072 posts, read 19,713,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Smith View Post
You are right, but many of his associates, girl friends, and Fabian Society peers did hold strange beliefs.
Yup. Shaw was a horn dog and not particularly discerning in his horn dogginess.
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Old 07-11-2018, 09:02 AM
 
Location: London, U.K.
88 posts, read 24,355 times
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Hi MarkS,


A very important puzzle of the Harry Potter books is the Location of Grimmauld Place, which Rowling says was a 20 minute walk from Kings Cross Station, which was the H.Q. of the Order of the Phoenix, i have a few ideas about this that i will write out in my next thread section, but not today, please read links:-


https://www.hp-lexicon.org/wizworld/...grimmauld.html


https://www.pottermore.com/features/...rimmauld-place
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Old 07-11-2018, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Maine
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More power to you, Derek. But honestly I think you're reading a lot more into this than Rowling ever intended. She wrote a fun story inspired by a lot of myth and folklore. But "burying hidden meanings" in the books? Nope. I just don't see it.
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Old 07-11-2018, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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The linked article below makes this claim:

Quote:
... In the 1890s, Shaw renounced Atheism and repackaged himself as a mystic. He also tinkered with his past. Now, his Atheism had not really been Atheism. He had called himself an Atheist only "because belief in God meant belief in the old tribal idol called Jehovah; and I would not pretend I did not know whether it existed or not." While Atheists still cleaned the Augean stables of superstition, they were now deemed "superficial and light-minded." They over-rated reason: "I exhausted rationalism at the age of twenty-four," Shaw told his friend Dame Laurentia McLachlan, an abbess, "and should have come to a dead stop if I had not proceeded to purely mystical assumptions." ...
The religion of George Bernard Shaw, playwright
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Old 07-12-2018, 08:00 AM
 
Location: London, U.K.
88 posts, read 24,355 times
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Hi MarkS,


I don't expect all to agree with me, that is the great joy about debate, but i like your searching questions that keep me on my toes!


Hi Vasily,


Thank you for the valued link!


Firstly we know George Bernard Shaw lived in Fitzroy Square in the 1890's


Fitzroy street is only 2 minutes walk away.


Please read 3rd paragraph on link below where it says "On 1st March 1888 the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn was established with the opening of the Isis-Urania Temple at 17 Fitzroy Street."


Byzant Scriptorium - The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn


Please note that both Fitzroy Square and Fitzroy Street were very run down during Victorian times, thus George Bernard Shaw called his residence "This most repulsive house!".



No doubt after a night of ceremonial magic at the temple, members would visit George for a nightcap ha ha!
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Old 07-12-2018, 09:30 AM
 
Location: London, U.K.
88 posts, read 24,355 times
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Rowling explains that Grimmauld Place was within a mile or 20 minutes walk from Kings Cross Station, this would apply to both George Bernard Shaw's residence in Fitzroy Square and the Order of the Golden Dawn's Temple in Fitzroy Street, perhaps Potter's Order of the Phoenix?


Both area's were shabby in Victorian times for "Grim Old Place" or Grimmauld Place, perhaps Rowling was inspired by Shaw's residence, i know he thought it very shabby, you choose Ha Ha!


https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Muggle...rimmauld_Place
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Old 07-18-2018, 06:45 AM
 
18,107 posts, read 16,444,002 times
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From what I gathered the books were sort of simplistic and written for older children. Imaginative and colorful but formulaic.
I missed the Chronicles of Narnia which I would have eaten up in grade school. I tried reading them as an adult and didn't enjoy them due to a lack of depth.
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