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Old 11-28-2019, 09:57 AM
 
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Did these actually exist?

Wild Photos That Show The True Scale Of Things
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Old 11-28-2019, 10:25 PM
 
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They were from the Jurassic period.
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Old 12-01-2019, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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A reptile or bird of that scale would be flightless. The largest WINGspans of flighted birds are about 24 feet. It all has to do with how much weight can be lofted. Once you drop the flight requirement, animals with wings can get big - and mean.
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Old Yesterday, 01:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
A reptile or bird of that scale would be flightless. The largest WINGspans of flighted birds are about 24 feet. It all has to do with how much weight can be lofted. Once you drop the flight requirement, animals with wings can get big - and mean.
I dont think size would matter, as long as their bones had air sacs and were light enough, the larger the wing span, the more lift generated.


The dinosaur bird in that picture above probably has close to a 40-60ft wingspan, and the wings have ALOT of surface area, meaning they can lift a heavier body
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Old Yesterday, 02:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
Yes, they actually existed. Quetzalcoatlus was a species of pterosaur. Whether it could fly or not is controversial since no one knows how much it actually weighed.

Quetzalcoatlus: largest flying animal…or not? | Bio-Aerial Locomotion

https://www.livescience.com/3190-hug...-airborne.html
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Old Yesterday, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Image showing size of quetzalcoatlus compared to a human being:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...tlus_scale.jpg

The third photo BTW shows the talons of the Harpy Eagle - the largest known eagle, feeds on monkeys:

The harpy eagle is so big, It looks like a human in a costume. And it’s becoming extinct | Upsocl
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Old Yesterday, 06:43 PM
 
10,769 posts, read 10,602,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
A reptile or bird of that scale would be flightless. The largest WINGspans of flighted birds are about 24 feet. It all has to do with how much weight can be lofted. Once you drop the flight requirement, animals with wings can get big - and mean.
It sounds like HAIRY CHICKPEA would a dangerous name around a bird like that.
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Old Yesterday, 06:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
Image showing size of quetzalcoatlus compared to a human being:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...tlus_scale.jpg

The third photo BTW shows the talons of the Harpy Eagle
- the largest known eagle, feeds on monkeys:

The harpy eagle is so big, It looks like a human in a costume. And it’s becoming extinct | Upsocl
That photo looks like it was taken by a fisherman.
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Old Today, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
I dont think size would matter, as long as their bones had air sacs and were light enough, the larger the wing span, the more lift generated.


The dinosaur bird in that picture above probably has close to a 40-60ft wingspan, and the wings have ALOT of surface area, meaning they can lift a heavier body
The images later in the thread show atrophied wings. It probably flew alongside pigs.

Think of how a bird develops. To get from fledgling to huge takes time. Until they can fly they are easy prey. Ever notice how the only big birds that fly are from warm climates and depend on gliding and remaining aloft for extended periods? Ever seen the footage of these things trying to take off in less than optimal conditions? Too much weight and they can't get airborne. Not a good thing if a predator is on your tail or you are weak from hunger and can't get to your feeding grounds. With extended wingspan, the physical strain of increased wind loading on bones can break those light bones, effectively killing the animal. Nature explores the extremes. It never got more than a span of about 24 feet.
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